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BFI Player launches Us offshoot for UK classic films on Roku platform

BFI Player launches Us offshoot for UK classic films on Roku platform
SVoD platform to offer titles from filmmakers including Alfred Hitchcock for $5.99 monthly subscription.

The British Film Institute (BFI) is launching a Us offshoot of its SVoD service BFI Player.

BFI Player Classics will charge a subscription of $5.99 per month for access to a collection of around 140 UK features (or UK co-productions) from filmmakers including Alfred Hitchcock, Ken Russell, Ridley Scott and Sally Potter.

The service will be hosted in the Us on the Roku Channel, a streaming player that hosts SVoD and TVoD services including Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Video and HBO Now and also offers access to a library of
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Crime and Punishment: Close-Up on "Brighton Rock"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. John Boulting's Brighton Rock (1947) is showing December 23, 2017 - January 22, 2018 on Mubi in the United States. There’s a shadow cast over the sun-kissed, seaside resort of Brighton. In 1935, a vulnerable time between two world wars, a noirish stain of violent gangsterdom has contaminated the fun and frivolity of the town’s tourist trade. But that’s largely behind the scenes. In Brighton Rock, a distinctive 1947 British feature, the slums that harbor such murderous criminality are kept under wraps, cloaked by the blinding, warm, soaking sun. Based on Graham Greene’s 1938 novel of the same name, and directed by John Boulting (producing duties went to Boulting brother Roy, though the two would often switch roles for other films), this superb picture discloses with penetrating clarity an emotional street life teeming beneath the veneer of amusement park gaiety.This concealed corruption is made semi-public,
See full article at MUBI »

Appointment with Crime

Most British crime films of the '40s and '50s have been slow crossing the pond, but Olive Films has a winner here, a gloss on Yank gangster pix from an earlier era. Just clear of prison, a tough criminal vows to punish the gang that abandoned him, and carries it out a ruthless revenge. But I think it was a mistake for him to involve that dance hall girl... Appointment with Crime Blu-ray Olive Films 1946 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 91 min. / Street Date June 21, 2016 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98 Starring William Hartnell, Herbert Lom, Joyce Howard, Robert Beatty, Raymond Lovell, Alan Wheatley. Cinematography Gerald Moss, James Wilson Film Editor Monica Kimick Original Music George Melachrino Produced by Louis H. Jackson Written and Directed by John Harlow

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Ask today's American film fan about old British crime films, and he'll probably not be able to
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

London Stage Star and Olivier Henry V Leading Lady Asherson Dead at Age 99

'Henry V' Movie Actress Renée Asherson dead at 99: Laurence Olivier leading lady in acclaimed 1944 film (image: Renée Asherson and Laurence Olivier in 'Henry V') Renée Asherson, a British stage actress featured in London productions of A Streetcar Named Desire and Three Sisters, but best known internationally as Laurence Olivier's leading lady in the 1944 film version of Henry V, died on October 30, 2014. Asherson was 99 years old. The exact cause of death hasn't been specified. She was born Dorothy Renée Ascherson (she would drop the "c" some time after becoming an actress) on May 19, 1915, in Kensington, London, to Jewish parents: businessman Charles Ascherson and his second wife, Dorothy Wiseman -- both of whom narrowly escaped spending their honeymoon aboard the Titanic. (Ascherson cancelled the voyage after suffering an attack of appendicitis.) According to Michael Coveney's The Guardian obit for the actress, Renée Asherson was "scantly
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Richard Attenborough, Oscar-Winning Director And Acclaimed Actor, Dies At 90

Director and actor Richard Attenborough has died at the age of 90. An acclaimed performer who seamlessly segued from working in front of the camera to behind it, Attenborough earned two Oscars for his illuminating biopic Gandhi, for Best Picture and Best Director at the 1983 ceremony.

That victory came after a long and fruitful career in cinema for Attenborough, which began with an uncredited role as a deserting sailor in 1942 pic In Which We Serve. The British actor’s breakthrough role came five years later, in John Boulting’s adaptation of the Graham Greene novel Brighton Rock. From there, Attenborough’s star continued to climb. He would go on to work prolifically in British cinema, appearing in many comedies including Private’s Progress and I’m All Right Jack. Attenborough also succeeded on the stage, leading the West End production of Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap for a time.

The actor
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Lord Richard Attenborough Passes Away at 90

We regret to inform you that Lord Richard Attenborough, whose career as an actor and then filmmaker spanned nearly seventy years, has passed away at 90, just five days short of his birthday on August 29th. Attenborough died earlier today in west London, according to his son. The two-time Oscar-winner Attenborough had continuously struggled with health problems since he suffered a stroke in 2008; last year, he moved into a nursing home, in order to be with his wife.

Born Richard Samuel Attenborough on August 29th, 1923 in Cambridge, England, Mr. Attenborough enlisted in the Royal Air Force during WWII; he ended up acting in such wartime propaganda films as Noël Coward’s In Which We Serve (1942) and John Boulting’s Journey Together (1943), where Attenborough appeared opposite ...

Click to continue reading Lord Richard Attenborough Passes Away at 90
See full article at Screen Rant »

Richard Attenborough, Oscar-winning director of 'Gandhi,' dies at 90

  • Hitfix
Richard Attenborough, Oscar-winning director of 'Gandhi,' dies at 90
Oscar-winning filmmaker and actor Richard Attenborough, who delighted cinema audiences across some six decades, has died, according to his son. He was 90 years old. According to the BBC, Attenborough had been in a nursing home with his wife for a number of years, and he had been bound to a wheelchair following a fall six years ago. Attenborough began his career in front of the camera, drawing raves for work in films like John Boulting's "Brighton Rock" in 1947, John Sturges' "The Great Escape" and Robert Wise's "The Sand Pebbles" opposite Steve McQueen, as well as Richard Fleischer's Oscar-nominated "Doctor Dolittle" opposite Rex Harrison. He transitioned to directing with ease with the Golden Globe-winning "Oh! What a Lovely War" in 1969 and developed a keen interest in history and biopics with his work. More accolades came for the Winston Churchill early years tale "Young Winston" in 1972, star-studded World
See full article at Hitfix »

The acting roles of Richard Attenborough

Feature Aliya Whiteley 3 Apr 2014 - 07:22

Tend to think of Richard Attenborough as a kindly old man? Aliya digs into his early career to find some far nastier roles...

British cinema has always liked its angry young men: Richard Burton, Albert Finney, Laurence Harvey and others all played the 1950s and 60s social animal, raging against the class system and the staid attitudes of post-war Britain.

But they weren’t the first angry young man on the screen. Maybe that crown could be claimed by an unlikely actor – Richard Attenborough. Attenborough is best known now as a director and producer, for films such as Gandhi, Chaplin and Shadowlands. When he gets thought of as an actor, it’s often as a kindly old man with a white beard. Misguided, sometimes, as when he played John Hammond, the owner of Jurassic Park, but not downright nasty. A lot of his earlier
See full article at Den of Geek »

Top 10 movie adaptations

Books and films have been joined at the hip ever since the earliest days of cinema, and adaptations of novels have regularly provided audiences with the classier end of the film spectrum. Here, the Guardian and Observer's critics pick the 10 best

• Top 10 family movies

• Top 10 war movies

• Top 10 teen movies

• Top 10 superhero movies

• Top 10 westerns

• Top 10 documentaries

• More Guardian and Observer critics' top 10s

10. Planet of the Apes

Although the source novel, La Planète des Singes, was written by Frenchman Pierre Boule and originally reached its futureshock climax in Paris, this enduring sci-fi fantasy is profoundly American, putting Charlton Heston's steel-jawed patriotism to incredible use. It also holds up surprisingly well as a jarring allegory for the population's fears over escalating cold war tensions.

Beginning with a spaceship crash-landing on an unknown planet after years of cryogenic sleep, Franklin J Schaffner's film soon gets into gear as Heston's upstanding
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Top 10 movie adaptations

Books and films have been joined at the hip ever since the earliest days of cinema, and adaptations of novels have regularly provided audiences with the classier end of the film spectrum. Here, the Guardian and Observer's critics pick the 10 best

• Top 10 family movies

• Top 10 war movies

• Top 10 teen movies

• Top 10 superhero movies

• Top 10 westerns

• Top 10 documentaries

• More Guardian and Observer critics' top 10s

10. Planet of the Apes

Although the source novel, La Planète des Singes, was written by Frenchman Pierre Boule and originally reached its futureshock climax in Paris, this enduring sci-fi fantasy is profoundly American, putting Charlton Heston's steel-jawed patriotism to incredible use. It also holds up surprisingly well as a jarring allegory for the population's fears over escalating cold war tensions.

Beginning with a spaceship crash-landing on an unknown planet after years of cryogenic sleep, Franklin J Schaffner's film soon gets into gear as Heston's upstanding
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

British cinema's holy fools

In the 1940s and 50s, the Boulting brothers won over filmgoers and critics with a series of classics – from Brighton Rock to Private's Progress. As the BFI begins a retrospective, Michael Newton explores their version of Britain

The history of the Boulting brothers is the history of British cinema in miniature. The brilliance, the comforts and the disappointments are all there. In the 1940s, they take off from documentary realism to reach the heights of noir extravagance, before falling back into a gently unexciting worthiness. At the start of the 1950s they produce two fascinating oddities, characteristic of the oddity of the times. Later that decade, they turn to cosily satirical farce, the products of an exasperated, grump. The 1960s see them trying to get with it and making a middle-aged effort to "swing", but also creating one work that finds a vulnerable, extraordinary beauty in ordinary lives. And after that comes a petering out,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Observer film critic steps down

His first column appeared in April 1963 and he would become the doyen of UK film critics. Having announced he will soon file his last column, he talks about meeting Chaplin, and Hollywood's greatest canine actors

Philip French's international reputation as a film critic is unrivalled. As recently as February, after a career with the Observer that began in 1963, an American film journal rated him as Britain's "greatest living movie analyst". But at the end of August he is to file his last column as this newspaper's film critic. After an illustrious half century, French, who was honoured with an OBE in January, has decided to step down following his 80th birthday the same month.

In his first column for the Observer, he bemoaned the lack of British films offering a believable picture of criminathe underworld. He noted "the tired vignettes of sub-Runyon characters" in The Small World of Sammy Lee starring Anthony Newley.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Clip joint: vinyl

LPs are arguably the music aficionado's format of choice – but what are the best movie moments featuring those hypnotic black discs?

This week's Clip joint is by James Arden, a writer and filmmaker who divides his time between London and York. Visit his website or follow him on twitter @jnarden. If you've got an idea for a future Clip joint, drop an email to adam.boult@guardian.co.uk.

The image of the needle on the spinning record, and the accompanying crackling sound, offers a unique visual and auditory opportunity for filmmakers to explore. It can build tension, create dreamy atmospheres, conjure memories or just look cool. Let's also not forget those unbeatable giant record sleeves. This week on Clip joint, we're looking for your best clips about vinyl.

Brighton Rock

In John Boulting's 1947 adaptation of Graham Greene's 1938 novel, Richard Attenborough stars as Pinkie, a psychopathic young gangster in Brighton.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Hugo – review

Martin Scorsese's family friendly fantasy is a cinephile's delight: a beautifully designed homage to the power of the first film-makers

"I would recognise the sound of a movie projector anywhere!" says one of cinema's greatest pioneers, hearing that mechanical, sprockety whirr. It's a climactic moment in Martin Scorsese's new film: a family fantasy adventure in 3D which turns out to be a hi-tech magic lantern presentation on the wonder of early cinema, and its origins in the world of clockwork craftsmanship: toys, games, illusions.

Hugo is pitched as much to cinephile adults as children, and insists, in a fervent if rather pedagogic way, on that magical quality of cinema which children and grownups generally feel without needing to be told. This is a spectacular and gorgeously created film, with allusions to Harold Lloyd and Fritz Lang, and it's an almost overwhelming assault on the senses from the very
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Brighton Rock’ – a less-than-stellar adaptation

Brighton Rock

Directed by Rowan Joffe

United Kingdom, 2010

No stranger to adaptations, Graham Greene has seen nearly 20 of his novels take their turn on the big-screen. Some (The End of the Affair in 1955, 1969, and 1999 and A Gun for Hire in 1961, 1972, and 1991) have turned up multiple times. The latest, Brighton Rock, directed by Rowan Joffe who is more famous for his screenplays (The American, 28 Weeks Later) than his behind-the-camera skills marks the second time that the gangster-tale of Pinkie Brown gets the cinematic treatment.

In 1947 Richard Attenborough played the lead role with particular menace in a production headed by John Boulting. The shadowy noir remained faithful to the plot of the Greene novel, but removed much of the deeper religious complexities, settling for above-average genre film rather than the psychological drama the book favors.

The 2011 production features Sam Riley, best known for his portrayal of Ian Curtis in the Joy Division-biopic Control,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Netflix Nuggets: Russians Filming G.I. Joe Dolls Fighting Hercules for the Serpent’s Egg

Netflix has revolutionized the home movie experience for fans of film with its instant streaming technology. Netflix Nuggets is my way of spreading the word about independent, classic and foreign films made available by Netflix for instant streaming.

This Week’s New Instant Releases…

Promised Lands (1974)

Streaming Available: 04/19/2011

Cast: Documentary

Director: Susan Sontag

Synopsis: Set in Israel during the final days of the 1973 Yom Kippur War, this powerful documentary — initially barred by Israel authorities — from writer-director Susan Sontag examines divergent perceptions of the enduring Arab-Israeli clash. Weighing in on matters related to socialism, anti-Semitism, nation sovereignty and American materialism are The Last Jew writer Yoram Kaniuk and military physicist Yuval Ne’eman.

Vision: From the Life of Hildegard von Bingen (2009)

Streaming Available: 04/19/2011

Cast: Barbara Sukowa, Heino Ferch, Hannah Herzsprung, Gerald Alexander Held, Lena Stolze, Sunnyi Melles

Synopsis: Directed by longtime star of independent German cinema Margarethe von Trotta, this reverent
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Blu-ray Review: Brighton Rock – Classic Film Suffers From Unsightly Grain

John Boulting’s seminal crime picture Brighton Rock is still regarded by many as one of the greatest British films of the post-war period, distinguished as a full-on, abrasive noir that lacks the stereotypical sheen and austerity of fare made on our shores. Rather, it is a hard-nosed meditation on life, love, and faith that has enjoyed a surprising endurance in the 60-plus years since its release. Recently brought back into the cultural consciousness with Rowan Joffe’s well-made if bloated remake, this is an incredibly opportune time to revisit the original, which finds its way to Blu-Ray this week.

Pinkie Brown (Richard Attenborough) is the violent leader of a gang, who murders a pestering newspaper reporter on a Brighton pier. However, tied to his crime and capable of proving his guilt is Plain Jane waitress Rose (Carol Marsh), and so Pinkie takes it upon himself to ensnare her in his charms,
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Brighton Rock – DVD Review

Frustratingly, I had seen the very recent remake of Brighton Rock before getting the chance to see the original. A quick look around at other reviews suggests I enjoyed the Rowan Joffe’s adaptation more than most.

Brighton Rock (1947) is a tighter film with a swifter pace (running almost 20 minutes shorter than its 2011 counterpart), the original adaptation of Graham Greene’s novel stands out for a few reasons and John Boulting’s use of Brighton as an actual location is one of the most interesting highlights.

As opposed to Rowan Joffe’s haunted, dilapidated 1960s Brighton (Eastbourne standing in as substitute), this ‘40s Brighton is indeed a living, breathing character within the film. Joffe wished to paint his version with drained colours and sense of decay, however, there is something more inherently sinister about director John Boulting’s use of the bustling seaside town. The knowledge that such devious schemes
See full article at FilmShaft.com »

Win – Brighton Rock on Blu-ray, 3 Copies To Give Away!

In the last line of our pan of the Brighton Rock remake, we advised that instead of paying to see it you should “save your money and buy the forthcoming Blu-ray transfer of the original instead”. And now that the exciting release of the John Boulting directed adaptation of Graham Greene’s murder thriller is but just 7 days away, we have teamed up with Optimum Releasing to give away 3 copies of the Blu-ray.

Brighton Rock stars Richard Attenborough (The Great Escape, Jurassic Park, Elizabeth) in perhaps his most iconic onscreen role as Pinkie: a small time hoodlum running a protection racket at a Brighton racecourse. Following the murder of a visiting journalist, Pinkie becomes involved with Rose (Carol Marsh) a café waitress and potentially dangerous witness. Marrying her seems to ensure her silence, but events escalate and eventually lead to Pinky’s undoing and a thrilling and memorable climax.

Also
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Brighton Rock (1947) DVD review

While a newspaper headline reveals the death of gang member William Kite, our attention is soon turned to the arrival in Brighton of one overtly nervous tabloid rep, Kolley Kibber, known to the local mob as Fred Hale (Alan Wheatley). Soon on the run from them, Hale allows the story to show us a fantastic view of 1940s Brighton as he hares through the Lanes and main streets to end up on Palace Pier.

So unwraps the story of Pinkie Brown (Richard Attenborough) and his hoodlum friends.

Attenborough’s performance from his first appearance is of an Ocd-driven, young Catholic gang leader, brooding, demanding and anxious – an odd portrayal for a figure in Pinkie’s position of power. Nevertheless, it’s this devious anxiety that shows him as cold and calculating. But it’s when he meets wide-eyed café waitress Rose (Carol Marsh) that he opens up a little, albeit
See full article at Shadowlocked »
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