Walter Coy (I) - News Poster

News

Warlock (1959)

As the first wave of ‘adult’ westerns began to fade, 1959 gave us a burst of genuinely adult stories about the famed lawless towns of the frontier. Henry Fonda is at his moody best in a replay of his earlier Wyatt Earp, de-mythologized as just one more self-oriented opportunist in a land where even lawmen have an angle to play. But Fonda’s gun skills are impressive, and his deadly Clay Blaisedell is halfway to becoming the soulless ‘Frank’ from Once Upon a Time in The West. Edward Dmytryk almost rights his capsized directing career, and Robert Alan Aurthur’s screenplay delivers both an intense drama, & great gunslinging action.

Warlock

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1959 / Colo / 2:35 widescreen / 122 min. / Street Date May 21, 2019 / Available from Twilight Time Movies / 29.95

Starring: Richard Widmark, Henry Fonda, Anthony Quinn, Dorothy Malone, Dolores Michaels, Wallace Ford, Tom Drake, Richard Arlen, DeForest Kelley, Frank Gorshin, Vaughn Taylor, Don Beddoe, Whit Bissell,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Today in Soap Opera History (December 28)

1984: The final episode of Edge of Night aired on ABC."History speaks to artists. It changes the artist's thinking and is constantly reshaping it into different and unexpected images."

Anselm Kiefer

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1964: Daytime soap opera A Flame in the Wind premiered on ABC. Producer Joseph Hardy, whose creative efforts helped turn Love of Life into one of the top-ranking daytime dramas, changed things up for the new series.

"With most new serials it takes months to build up audience awareness," Hardy explained at the time. "The story usually doesn’t begin unfolding until long after each of the characters has been introduced. I
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Today in Soap Opera History (December 28)

1984: The final episode of The Edge of Night aired on ABC."History is a vast early warning system."

Norman Cousins

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1964: Daytime soap opera A Flame in the Wind premiered on ABC. Producer Joseph Hardy, whose creative efforts helped turn Love of Life into one of the top-ranking daytime dramas, changed things up for the new series.

"With most new serials it takes months to build up audience awareness," Hardy explained at the time. "The story usually doesn’t begin unfolding until long after each of the characters has been introduced. I deliberately shortened this traditional build-up period with new serials by concentrating
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Mitchum Stars in TCM Movie Premiere Set Among Japanese Gangsters Directed by Future Oscar Winner

Robert Mitchum ca. late 1940s. Robert Mitchum movies 'The Yakuza,' 'Ryan's Daughter' on TCM Today, Aug. 12, '15, Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” series is highlighting the career of Robert Mitchum. Two of the films being shown this evening are The Yakuza and Ryan's Daughter. The former is one of the disappointingly few TCM premieres this month. (See TCM's Robert Mitchum movie schedule further below.) Despite his film noir background, Robert Mitchum was a somewhat unusual choice to star in The Yakuza (1975), a crime thriller set in the Japanese underworld. Ryan's Daughter or no, Mitchum hadn't been a box office draw in quite some time; in the mid-'70s, one would have expected a Warner Bros. release directed by Sydney Pollack – who had recently handled the likes of Jane Fonda, Barbra Streisand, and Robert Redford – to star someone like Jack Nicholson or Al Pacino or Dustin Hoffman.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

I Eat Your Skin

Here’s another installment featuring Joe Dante’s reviews from his stint as a critic for Film Bulletin circa 1969-1974. Our thanks to Video Watchdog and Tim Lucas for his editorial embellishments!

Zombies menace islanders in dull, inept black-and-white mini-budgeter. Properly duelled, it will get by in lower class ballyhoo markets and drive-ins. Rating: Gp.

It’s hard to tell the zombies without a scorecard in I Eat Your Skin, a black-and-white voodoo horror cheapie out of the bottom of the formula programmer barrel. Between endless bouts of tribal dancing, some crusty-looking native monsters stalk around the Florida locations looking believably dead, but the humans in the cast are so wooden there’s not much contrast. None of the gore promised in the title ever materializes, and no skin gets eaten, either. Where doubled with I Drink Your Blood, this vapid Cinemation Industries release should perform satisfactorily in lower class
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

See also

Credited With |  External Sites


Recently Viewed