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Foreplays #7: Jean-Luc Godard & Anne-Marie Miéville’s "Liberté et Patrie"

  • MUBI
Foreplays is a column that explores under-known short films by renowned directors. Jean-Luc Godard & Anne-Marie Miéville's Liberté et Patrie (2002) is free to watch below. Mubi's retrospective For Ever Godard is showing from November 12, 2017 - January 16, 2018 in the United States.I. One of the most beautiful essay films ever made, Liberté et Patrie (2002) turns out to also be one of the most accessible collaborations of Jean-Luc Godard and Anne-Marie Miéville. The deeply moving lyricism of this short may astonish even those spectators who arrive to it casually, without any prior knowledge of the filmmakers’s oeuvre. Contrary to other works by the couple, Liberté et Patrie is built on a recognizable narrative strong enough to easily accommodate all the unconventionalities of the piece: a digressive structure full of bursts of undefined emotion; an unpredictable rhythm punctuated by sudden pauses, swift accelerations, intermittent blackouts and staccatos; a mélange of materials where
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Movie Poster of the Week: The Ukrainian Trilogy of Yuliya Solntseva

  • MUBI
Above: Soviet poster for The Enchanted Desna (Yuliya Solntseva, Ussr, 1964). Artist: Grebenshikov.Nine years ago I was asked to participate in a film blogger thread about personal cinematic Holy Grails, and as my number one choice I selected, without hesitation, Yuliya Solntseva’s The Enchanted Desna (1964), a film I thought I might never see in any format, let alone on 70mm. But this weekend, dreams will indeed come true as New York’s Museum of the Moving Image plays Solntseva’s Ukrainian Trilogy in 70mm and 35mm. Solntseva (1901-1989) was an actress of note (she starred in the title roles of Aelita: Queen of Mars and The Cigarette Girl from Mosselprom in 1924) who, upon the death of her husband, the great Aleksandr Dovzhenko, in 1956, turned to directing to realize his unfinished scripts. The result, by all accounts, are among the most poetic and magical of films.You can read
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Of Sun and Rivers: Yuliya Solntseva’s Ukrainian Trilogy

  • MUBI
Poem of an Inland Sea. Image courtesy of Gosfilmofond.Yuliya Solntseva, whose pseudonym is derived from Russian for ‘sun,’ has largely remained eclipsed by the fame of her husband and collaborator, Aleksandr Dovzhenko, one of the most original filmmakers that came from the Soviet silent cinema. She was also blessed by that union. Solntseva’s “Ukrainian Trilogy,” which New York’s Museum of the Moving Image will screen this weekend, was made from Dovzhenko’s scripts that he never produced, having died in 1956 right before principal shooting was scheduled to begin on Poem of a Sea. The project was picked up by Solntseva who completed the film in 1958—and went on to direct two more of her husband’s scripts, imbuing the films with a poetic sensibility that the two of them shared.MoMI added “Inland” to the sea of the name, which the original title lacks as an unnecessary specification.
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Means of Film Production: The Documentary Cinema of Manfred Kirchheimer

  • MUBI
The American Skyscraper and Louis Sullivan. Courtesy of the filmmaker.It’s rare to come across such a humble yet cogent body of work as that of Manfred Kirchheimer. His career stretches across six decades but it would be a mistake to reduce his films to mere historical records, for they can enclose enthralling stories of ordinary New Yorkers or celebrate the beauty of urban structures all while confronting head-on layered questions on class, race and identity. Throughout the years, his subjects have fluctuated from workers pushing carts through New York’s Garment District, the docking of a transatlantic ocean liner or a community of Jewish émigrés in the Manhattan neighborhood of Washington Heights. As modest as his filmography might seem, one shouldn’t oversee its substantial contribution to American documentary and independent cinema.During a recent conversation, Kirchheimer told me he had recently retired as a teacher at the
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Video Essay. Water and Stone: "The Lovers on the Bridge"

The fourteenth entry in an on-going series of audiovisual essays by Cristina Álvarez López and Adrian Martin. Mubi will be showing Leos Carax's The Lovers on the Bridge (1991) May 10 - June 9 in the United States.Leos Carax’s Les amants du Pont-Neuf (The Lovers on the Bridge) is a true monument of 1990s cinema. It covers a lot of ground, on every level: starting down in the gutter and looking a little like a documentary about Paris’s homeless, it soon reaches a point where an inner switch is flicked and surrealistic, romantic poetry literally lights up the screen. Alex (Denis Lavant)—an emblematic tramp in the tradition of silent cinema, only muckier—spies the equally lost soul, Michèle (Juliette Binoche, never better than here), an artist who, due to encroaching blindness, is on the run from her bourgeois background. Once the film explodes with the rapture of their
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Historic Kiev cinema eyes return after arson attack

  • ScreenDaily
Historic Kiev cinema eyes return after arson attack
Zhovten cinema was victim of arson attack during festival’s Lgbt sidebar; Baltic to Black Sea development network launched in Odessa.

Kiev’s historic Zhovten cinema could open its doors again at this year’s Molodist Film Festival (October 24 - November 1), a year after it was the victim of an arson attack during a screening of the French film Summer Nights by Mario Fanani during the festival’s Lgbt sidebar competition Sunny Bunny.

Speaking to Screen Daily at this week’s Odessa International Film Festival (Oiff), Molodist’s general director Andriy Khalpakhchi said: “We hope that we can have the cinema’s re-opened at our festival again because it is a very important venue for Molodist and for Kiev as the city’s oldest cinema.”

“At the time, I didn’t think that the Sunny Bunny was the reason for the attack. It was just a pretext for a lot of new businessmen who wanted the land
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Sentsov now a year in detention in Russia

  • ScreenDaily
Sentsov now a year in detention in Russia
Ukrainian filmmaker Oleg Sentsov’s detention by the Russian authorities has been extended by yet another two months to July 11.

This decision was made by Nikolai Tkachuk, a judge of the Moscow City Court, claiming that the charged offence poses a particular hazard to the public.

Initially, it had been expected that Sentsov’s trial would start yesterday (May 11), the first anniversary after his arrest on the Crimean peninsula in May 2014.

However, Sentsov’s case will be kept in the public eye by the Ukrainian Pavilion at the International Village in Cannes’ Marché du Film in the next two weeks.

Visitors to the Pavilion will be invited to add their names to a petition calling for the 38-year-old director’s release.

This comes after the European Parliament passed a resolution in its plenary session in Strasbourg calling for the ¨immediate release¨ of all Ukrainian citizens illegally detained in Russia, including Sentsov and the Ukrainian pilot and MP
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In the Evening of the Day: Thom Andersen’s "The Thoughts That Once We Had"

  • MUBI
“Yet if you should forget me for a whileAnd afterwards remember, do not grieveFor if the darkness and corruption leaveA vestige of the thoughts that once we hadBetter by far you should forget and smileThan that you should remember and be sad.”—Christina Rossetti, Remember (1862)An opening title card from director Thom Andesen’s new feature film, The Thoughts That Once We Had, directly identifies the cinematic writings of philosopher Gilles Deleuze as the project's primary subject and inspiration. Deleuze’s two volumes on film, Cinema 1: The Movement-Image (1983) and Cinema 2: The Time-Image (1985), are today synonymous with a certain modernist school of thought that, while integrated in academia to such a degree as to be all but understood, remains quite radical. Unquestionably dense and provocatively pedantic, the French empiricist’s filmic texts integrate an array of theories and conceptualizations into a fairly delineated taxonomy, and are therefore fairly conducive
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Daily | La Furia Umana, Brooklyn Rail

In the new La Furia Umana: a symposium on the future of cinema plus articles on Harun Farocki, Jerry Lewis and Paul Thomas Anderson's Inherent Vice. The new Brooklyn Rail features pieces on Tsai Ming-liang's Rebels of the Neon God and J.P. Sniadecki's The Iron Ministry, exhibitions of work by Michael Snow and cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa and an interview with John Giorno. Also today: With Mad Max: Fury Road opening next month, a Ballardian primer to the Mad Max Universe; Jonathan Rosenbaum on Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Aleksandr Dovzhenko and Leni Riefenstahl; Robert Greene on Steve James's Hoop Dreams and Michael Powell's Peeping Tom; and lots more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | La Furia Umana, Brooklyn Rail

In the new La Furia Umana: a symposium on the future of cinema plus articles on Harun Farocki, Jerry Lewis and Paul Thomas Anderson's Inherent Vice. The new Brooklyn Rail features pieces on Tsai Ming-liang's Rebels of the Neon God and J.P. Sniadecki's The Iron Ministry, exhibitions of work by Michael Snow and cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa and an interview with John Giorno. Also today: With Mad Max: Fury Road opening next month, a Ballardian primer to the Mad Max Universe; Jonathan Rosenbaum on Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Aleksandr Dovzhenko and Leni Riefenstahl; Robert Greene on Steve James's Hoop Dreams and Michael Powell's Peeping Tom; and lots more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Ida producer to pitch at Connecting Cottbus

  • ScreenDaily
Ida producer to pitch at Connecting Cottbus
New projects by the producers of Ida and Crulic are among 13 selected from Albania to Ukraine to be pitched at this year’s Connecting Cottbus East-West co-production market (November 6-7).

Poland’s Opus Film, which produced Pawel Pawlikowski’s multi-award winner Ida and co-produced Fatih Akin’s Venice competition title The Cut, and production partner Teamwork Production will be presenting leading Polish stage director Grzegorz Jarzyna’s Owl, The Baker’s Daughter, first pitched in public at the Polish Days in Wroclaw in July.

Romanian producer-director Anca Damian’s (Crulic) Aparte Film will be in Cottbus with In Perfect Health about the son of a judge looking for the reason for his father’s unexpected death and the rest of his life.

Other projects selected for the 16th edition include:

Alexander Kviria’s The Button, which is being produced by Ablabuda Film, the company set up last year by Tamara Tatishvili, the former
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Dovzhenko biopic secures co-producers

  • ScreenDaily
Dovzhenko biopic secures co-producers
Konstantin Konovalov’s Odessa-set biopic about the Soviet film director Oleksandr Dovzhenko, Oleksandr Dovzhenko.Odessa-Debut, has already found co-producers in Finland and Argentina.

After first being pitched by Konovalov and his producer Volodymyr Filippov at last month’s Moscow Business Square co-production forum, the project, which is set in the Odessa of the mid-1920s when Dovzhenko was preparing to shoot his first feature The Diplomatic Pouch, was also presented in the programme of Odessa’s Film Industry Office on Thursday.

Born in today’s Ukraine, Dovzhenko - whose films include Earth and Arsenal - is on a par with such legendary early Soviet film-makers as Eisenstein and Pudovkin. The Dovzhenko Film Studios in Kiev were given his name after his death in 1956.

Speaking exclusively to Screen Daily, Konovalov confirmed that Rodrigo Vidal of Argentina’s Cinema 7 Films and Tony Valla of Finland’s Post Control are set to be partners in this project.

Producer Filippov
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International partners for Dovzhenko biopic

  • ScreenDaily
International partners for Dovzhenko biopic
Konstantin Konovalov’s Odessa-set biopic about the Soviet film director Oleksandr Dovzhenko, Oleksandr Dovzhenko.Odessa-Debut, has already found co-producers in Finland and Argentina.

After first being pitched by Konovalov and his producer Volodymyr Filippov at last month’s Moscow Business Square co-production forum, the project, which is set in the Odessa of the mid-1920s when Dovzhenko was preparing to shoot his first feature The Diplomatic Pouch, was also presented in the programme of Odessa’s Film Industry Office on Thursday.

Born in today’s Ukraine, Dovzhenko - whose films include Earth and Arsenal - is on a par with such legendary early Soviet film-makers as Eisenstein and Pudovkin. The Dovzhenko Film Studios in Kiev were given his name after his death in 1956.

Speaking exclusively to Screen Daily, Konovalov confirmed that Rodrigo Vidal of Argentina’s Cinema 7 Films and Tony Valla of Finland’s Post Control are set to be partners in this project.

Producer Filippov
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Odessa unveils works in progress

  • ScreenDaily
Odessa unveils works in progress
Exclusive: The Battle of Sevastopol among ten projects being presented next week.

Sergei Mokritsky’s biopic-war drama The Battle of Sevastopol (working title) is among ten projects being presented as ‘works in progress’ at next week’s Film Industry Office programme (July 14-17), taking place during the fifth Odessa International Film Festival (July 11-19).

The €3.6m Ukrainian-Russian co-production between Kiev-based Kinorob and Russia’s New People had been pitched during last year’s Industry Office programme in Odessa, and has been shooting in Kiev and Odessa after an initial shoot on the Crimea at the end of the last year.

The historical drama centres on the life of Lyudmila Pavlichenko who killed over 300 Nazis during the Second World War as a highly decorated sniper.

Yulia Peresild has been cast as Pavlichenko, who enjoyed a 16-year friendship with Eleanor Roosevelt (played here by UK actress Joan Blackham) and inspired a song written by the legendary folk singer [link=nm
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Patrick Cassavetti boards Lenin?!

  • ScreenDaily
Patrick Cassavetti boards Lenin?!
Exclusive: Veteran UK producer Patrick Cassavetti has boarded Marat Alykulov’s black comedy Lenin?!.

Cassavetti, producer on Terry Gilliam’s Brazil and Fear And Loathing in Las Vegas - agreed to become executive producer on the Kyrgyzstani project following talks in Cannes last month.

Speaking exclusively to ScreenDaily at this year’s Moscow Business Square (Mbs), producer Joanna Bence of Curb Denizen Productions said that Cassavetti will also offer new ‘perks’ to the ‘Help Bury Lenin?!’ crowdfunding campaign by giving burgeoning filmmakers the chance to receive personal feedback on their past or upcoming productions.

Bence also revealed that German-born, London-based DoP Stephan Bookas - who has worked on Maleficent and the upcoming Guardians of the Galaxy - is confirmed as cinematographer for the project, which was pitched at the Mbs’s co-production forum last year after having been presented at Busan’s Asian Project Market and Connecting Cottbus in autumn 2012.

Together with Curb Denizen producer partner [link=nm
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Silent movies

Think silent films reached a high point with The Artist? The pre-sound era produced some of the most beautiful, arresting films ever made. From City Lights to Metropolis, Guardian and Observer critics pick the 10 best

• Top 10 teen movies

• Top 10 superhero movies

• Top 10 westerns

• Top 10 documentaries

• Top 10 movie adaptations

• Top 10 animated movies

• More Guardian and Observer critics' top 10s

10. City Lights

City Lights was arguably the biggest risk of Charlie Chaplin's career: The Jazz Singer, released at the end of 1927, had seen sound take cinema by storm, but Chaplin resisted the change-up, preferring to continue in the silent tradition. In retrospect, this isn't so much the precious behaviour of a purist but the smart reaction of an experienced comedian; Chaplin's films rarely used intertitles anyway, and though it is technically "silent", City Lights is very mindful of it own self-composed score and keenly judged sound effects.

At its heart,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

DVD Review: 'Dovzhenko: War Trilogy' (rerelease)

  • CineVue
★★★★★ Despite often being cited as one of the most important early Soviet filmmakers - primarily for his Soviet montage theory - the name Alexander Dovzhenko has failed to garner the same critical acclaim in the west as his contemporaries. However, thanks to Mr Bongo, his most revered and respected work is again available in the convenient Dovzhenko: War Trilogy box set. Despite being disregarded by Soviet critics on its initial release for its perceived 'counter-revolutionary' viewpoint, the three films included remain a testament to the pioneering work of this underrated director.

Read more »
See full article at CineVue »

The Noteworthy: Aurora, Man(oel) of Steel, Daney's Legacy

News.

The Aurora tragedy, in which a man took the lives of 14 people, and injured many others, in a horrific shooting at a midnight screening of The Dark Knight Rises, has devastated everyone. David Hudson rounds up some of the responses critics have offered in the wake of this unthinkable event. Issue 63 of Senses of Cinema is now available online for your perusal. Among the offerings are pieces on Herzog's Aguirre, the Wrath of God, Ferrara's Go Go Tales and an assortment of festival reports. Above: Jerry Lewis sure knows how to keep busy. The 86 year-old is hard at work on directing his first play, a stage adaptation of The Nutty Professor. Dave Itzkoff, who visited Lewis during rehearsals, has a piece on the subject in The New York Times. Claire Denis is set to begin shooting The Bastards, her next feature. We've yet to get any plot details, but
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Daily Briefing. Guy Maddin's "Spiritismes" + Gene Tierney and More

  • MUBI
"Over eighty percent of silent films are lost. I've always considered a lost film as a narrative with no known final resting place — doomed to wander the landscape of film history, sad, miserable and unable to project itself to the people who might love it." That's Guy Maddin, as quoted by Kim Morgan, introducing Maddin's Spiritismes, happening now at the Centre Pompidou in Paris ("During 'séances'... Maddin and his actors will allow themselves to be possessed by the wandering spirits of the dead, to bring their movies back to life") through March 12:

Filmmaking, dead made undead, is happening live at the Centre — lost or unrealized films by directors as diverse as Jean Vigo, Kenji Mizoguchi, Lois Weber, William Wellman, von Stroheim (I will appear in that particular Poto-Poto), Alexandre Dovjenko and more are coming — rising from the dead, in their own unique way. Maddin will be shooting one film a day.
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Nyaff, Film Quarterly and Lots More

"Ah, the pungent odor, the fermented esprit, the sulfurous insanity of the New York Asian Film Fest!" exclaims Michael Atkinson, introducing his overview of the lineup in the Voice. "It's a new year for the city's favorite attack of the imported-irrational, and as always, the jejune state of the late-spring/early-summer box office gets a shot in the ass. The pulp is especially ripe this year, particularly from Japan, where manga-ness seems to have gone from a national pastime to a mass psychosis."

For R Emmet Sweeney, writing for TCM, "most of the revelations in this year's slate came in the Nyaff sidebar, Sea of Revenge: New Korean Thrillers, so I'll focus there." Michael J Anderson splits the difference, concentrating on Takashi Miike's Ninja Kids!!! and Na Hong-jin's The Chaser (image above). Time Out New York's got a slide of "titles worth cutting class for." Cinespect's Ryan Wells picks
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