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Sliff 2018 – Once Upon A Time On The West Screens at The St. Louis Public Library November 10th

This year, the St. Louis International Film Festival will celebrate “Golden Anniversaries” of five movies made in 1968. They are: Bullitt, Medium Cool, Once Upon A Time In The West, Pretty Poison, and Rosemary’S Baby. Once Upon A Time In The West will screen Saturday November 10th at 2pm at The St. Louis Public Library. This is a Free event. This screening of Once Upon A Time In The West will have an intro and post-film discussion by We Are Movie Geeks editor/creative director Tom Stockman.

Sergio Leone’s “Once Upon a Time in the West” — a Western-to-end-all-Westerns — brings Sliff Golden Anniversaries: 1968 retrospective to an appropriately rousing conclusion. Rail baron Morton (Gabriele Ferzetti) angles to claim the single piece of land around Flagstone with water on it, knowing the new railroad will have to stop there. He sends his henchman Frank (Henry Fonda) to scare the land’s owner,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Elle / Blow Up

Elle

Blu-ray

Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

2017 / Color / 2.40:1 widescreen / Street Date March 14, 2017

Starring: Isabelle Huppert, Laurent Lafitte, Anne Consigny, Charles Berling.

Cinematography: Stéphane Fontaine

Film Editor: Job Ter Burg

Written by David Birke

Produced by Saïd Ben Saïd and Michel Merkt

Directed by Paul Verhoeven

Michèle Leblanc, glamorous entrepreneur of a successful video game company, is the calm at the center of many storms. Her son’s girlfriend has given birth to another man’s child, an employee is stalking her with anime porn and her botox-ridden mother is betrothed to a male prostitute.

In the face of all this outrageous fortune, Michèle remains cool, calm and collected, even in the aftermath of her own harrowing sexual assault.

Elle, the new film from the Dutch provocateur Paul Verhoeven, begins with that already infamous assault, our heroine struggling under the weight of her attacker while an unblinking cat perches nearby, watching.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Le amiche (The Girlfriends)

Michelangelo Antonioni's pre-international breakthrough drama is as good as anything he's done, a flawlessly acted and directed story of complex relationships -- that include his 'career' themes before the existential funk set in. It's one of the best-blocked dramatic films ever... the direction is masterful. Le amiche Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 817 1955 / B&W / 1:37 flat full frame / 106 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date June 7, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Eleonora Rossi Drago, Gabriele Ferzetti, Franco Fabrizi, Valentina Cortese, Madeleine Fischer, Yvonne Furneaux, Anna Maria Pancani, Luciano Volpato, Maria Gambarelli, Ettore Manni. Cinematography Gianni De Venanzo Film Editor Eraldo Da Roma Original Music Giovanni Fusco Written by Suso Cecchi D'Amico, Michelangelo Antonioni, Alba de Cespedes from a book by Cesare Pavese Produced by Giovanni Addessi Directed by Michelangelo Antonioni

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

It's time to stop being so intimidated by Michelangelo Antonioni. His epics of existential alienation La notte, L'eclisse and
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Gabriele Ferzetti obituary

Charismatic Italian actor who starred in Antonioni’s L’Avventura and played opposite George Lazenby in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service

The Italian actor Gabriele Ferzetti, who has died aged 90, was never in danger of being typecast. He played a multitude of different film roles in every known genre, over seven decades, and just about the only constant in his long career was that he was perennially handsome and charismatic without being showy.

To cinephiles, he was most memorable for his intense performance of quiet desperation as the unfulfilled wealthy playboy seeking his missing lover in Michelangelo Antonioni’s L’Avventura (1960). However, his most widely known roles, dubbed into English, were as the unscrupulous railroad baron on crutches in Once Upon a Time in the West (1968) and as James Bond’s father-in-law, a powerful crime boss, in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969), the one with George Lazenby as 007.

Continue reading.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘On Her Majesty’s Secret Service’ – a challenging, invigorating and romantic piece of action filmmaking

On Her Majesty’s Secret Service

Written by Richard Maibaum

Directed by Peter Hunt

UK, 1969

To call On Her Majesty’s Secret Service underappreciated is to call the sky blue. Only in the years since the release of Daniel Craig’s introduction to the series, Casino Royale, has Ohmss begun to be reappraised as a realistic, character-driven approach to the Bond series. Its failure at the box office compared to the Connery entries that preceded it led to the producers, Albert “Cubby” Broccoli and Harry Salzman, returning to the Goldfinger formula of larger than life villains, iconic henchmen, ludicrously elaborate take-over-the-world schemes, and a generally heightened sense to the proceedings, all of which are noticeably absent from Ohmss.

Sean Connery had a rough experience during filming of 1967’s You Only Live Twice. The media scrutiny, long filming periods, and promotional duties caused him to leave the role that had made his career.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Top Father's Day Films Ever Made? Here Are Five Dads - Ranging from the Intellectual to the Pathological

'Father of the Bride': Steve Martin and Kimberly Williams. Top Five Father's Day Movies? From giant Gregory Peck to tyrant John Gielgud What would be the Top Five Father's Day movies ever made? Well, there have been countless films about fathers and/or featuring fathers of various sizes, shapes, and inclinations. In terms of quality, these range from the amusing – e.g., the 1950 version of Cheaper by the Dozen; the Oscar-nominated The Grandfather – to the nauseating – e.g., the 1950 version of Father of the Bride; its atrocious sequel, Father's Little Dividend. Although I'm unable to come up with the absolute Top Five Father's Day Movies – or rather, just plain Father Movies – ever made, below are the first five (actually six, including a remake) "quality" patriarch-centered films that come to mind. Now, the fathers portrayed in these films aren't all heroic, loving, and/or saintly paternal figures. Several are
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Criterion announces its May Blu-ray line-up

Criterion has announced six new Blu-ray releases as part of its May line-up of the digitally remastered Criterion Collection. Two of the most notable releases are Charlie Chaplin’s Limelight and Bette Midler-starrer The Rose, which are scheduled for release on May 19th.

The full line-up, with technical specifications and artworks, are listed below:

The Rose

Bette Midler exploded onto the screen with her take-no-prisoners performance in this quintessential film about fame and addiction from director Mark Rydell. Midler is the rock-and-roll singer Mary Rose Foster (known as the Rose to her legions of fans), whose romantic relationships and mental health are continuously imperiled by the demands of life on the road. Incisively scripted by Bo Goldman and beautifully shot by Vilmos Zsigmond (with assistance on the dazzling concert scenes by a host of other world-class cinematographers, including Conrad L. Hall, László Kovács, Owen Roizman, and Haskell Wexler), this
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

New on Video: ‘L’Avventura’

L’Avventura

Written by Michelangelo Antonioni, Elio Bartolini, and Tonino Guerra

Directed by Michelangelo Antonioni

Italy, 1960

Michelangelo Antonioni’s enigmatic and brilliant L’Avventura is one of the benchmarks for international art cinema, a somewhat disputable designation that was, nevertheless, very much in vogue at the time of its release. Take the 1960 Cannes Film Festival for example, where L’Avventura debuted to one of the event’s most divisive responses, with initially more boos than cheers greeting this affront to conventional film narrative and form. Yet, this was also the year of Fellini’s La Dolce Vita (the Palme d’Or winner), Chukhray’s Ballad of a Soldier, Bergman’s The Virgin Spring, Kalatozov’s Letter Never Sent, and Buñuel’s The Young One, to name just a few of the other titles at the festival, where, ultimately, L’Avventura came away with the Jury Prize (shared with Ichikawa’s
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: L’avventura

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: Nov. 25, 2014

Price: DVD $29.95, Blu-ray $39.95

Studio: Criterion

Monica Vitti does the ennui thing in Antonioni's L'avventura.

Michelangelo Antonioni (La notte) unleashed a new kind of cinematic grammar–one that was more concerned with pace and space than it was with dialogue–with his 1960 masterwork L’avventura.

An iconic and undeniably challenging slice of 1960s cinema and a gripping narrative in its own right, the classic L’avventura concerns the enigmatic disappearance of a young woman during a yachting trip off the coast of Sicily, and the search taken up by her disaffected lover (Once Upon a Time in the West’s Gabriele Ferzetti) and best friend (L’eclisse’s Monica Vitti, in her breakout role).

Antonioni’s controversial international sensation—it was the cocktail party conversation piece of the year—is a gorgeously shot tale of modern ennui and spiritual isolation.

Criterion’s new DVD and Blu-ray
See full article at Disc Dish »

Re-Viewed: On Her Majesty's Secret Service, the forgotten Bond classic

Bond 24 confirmed for 2015 release with Sam Mendes returning

James Bond: A history from Ian Fleming to Daniel Craig

On Her Majesty's Secret Service might be the sixth instalment in Eon's James Bond series, but for a long time it had the feel of one of the franchise's rogue entries Casino Royale and Never Say Never Again. Two years after Sean Connery signed off his initial 007 run with You Only Live Twice, producers Cubby Broccoli and Harry Saltzman undertook an exhaustive casting search with director Peter Hunt to find a replacement. They believed, rightly, that the role of James Bond was bigger than anyone who played him, and in 1968 George Lazenby - an Australian model with no prior acting experience - was unveiled as the new James Bond at the Dorchester Hotel.

Lazenby, of course, would only play Bond once and Ohmss's failure to set the box office alight meant
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

50 Years of Bond: ‘On Her Majesty’s Secret Service’ – a challenging, invigorating and romantic piece of action filmmaking

On Her Majesty’s Secret Service

Written by Richard Maibaum

Directed by Peter Hunt

UK, 1969

To call On Her Majesty’s Secret Service underappreciated is to call the sky blue. Only in the years since the release of Daniel Craig’s introduction to the series, Casino Royale, has Ohmss begun to be reappraised as a realistic, character-driven approach to the Bond series. Its failure at the box office compared to the Connery entries that preceded it led to the producers, Albert “Cubby” Broccoli and Harry Salzman, returning to the Goldfinger formula of larger than life villains, iconic henchmen, ludicrously elaborate take-over-the-world schemes, and a generally heightened sense to the proceedings, all of which are noticeably absent from Ohmss.

Sean Connery had a rough experience during filming of 1967′s You Only Live Twice. The media scrutiny, long filming periods, and promotional duties caused him to leave the role that had made his career.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Michelangelo Antonioni: centenary of a forgotten giant

The Italian master's challenging and difficult L'Avventura was booed at its premiere in Cannes. But nowadays the director gets something far more hurtful: indifference

This is the centenary year of Michelangelo Antonioni. He was born on 29 September 1912 and died in 2007 at the age of 94, having worked until almost the very end. As well as everything else, he gave us one of the founding myths of postwar cinema: The Booing of L'Avventura. For film historians, it's as pretty much important as the audience riots at the 1913 premiere of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring.

At the Cannes film festival on 15 May 1960, Antonioni presented his L'Avventura, a challenging and difficult film and a decisive break from his earlier work, replete with languorous spaces and silences. This was movie-modernism's difficult birth. The film was jeered so ferociously, so deafeningly, that poor Antonioni and his beautiful star Monica Vitti burst into tears where they sat. There
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

James Bond Declassified: File #6 - 'On Her Majesty's Secret Service' changes everything

  • Hitfix
James Bond Declassified: File #6 - 'On Her Majesty's Secret Service' changes everything
James Bond 007 Declassified File #6: "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" This series will trace the cinema history of James Bond, while also examining Ian Fleming's original novels as source material and examining how faithful (or not) the films have been to his work. Directed by Peter Hunt Screenplay by Richard Maibaum Produced by Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli Characters / Cast James Bond / George Lazenby Countess Tracy di Vicenzo / Diana Rigg Ernst Stavro Blofeld / Telly Savalas Marc-Ange Draco / Gabriele Ferzetti Irma Bunt / Ilse Steppat Sir Hilary Bray / George Baker Grunther / Yuri Borienko Shaun...
See full article at Hitfix »

Rockefeller's Melancholy

  • MUBI
In conjunction with La Furia Umana, Notebook is very happy to present Ted Fendt's original English translation of Luc Moullet's "Rockefeller's Melancholy," on Michelangelo Antonioni. Moullet's original French version can be found at La Furia Umana. Our special thanks to Mr. Moullet, La Furia Umana and Ted Fendt for making this possible.

Above: "John D. Rockefeller" (1917) by John Singer Sargent.

Drifting is the fundamental subject of Antonioni’s films. They are about beings who don’t know where they are going, who constantly contradict themselves, and are guided by their momentary impulses. We don’t understand what they feel or why they act as they do.

Psychological cinema could be defined in this way: it is psychological when you don’t understand the motivation of emotions and behaviors. If you understand, it means it’s easy, immediately, at a very superficial level... The filmmaker must therefore let it be
See full article at MUBI »

Films To Watch Before You Die #69 - Once Upon a Time in the West (1968)

D.J. Haza presents the next entry in his series of films to watch before you die...

Once Upon a Time in the West (Italian: C'era una volta il West), 1968.

Directed by Sergio Leone.

Starring Henry Fonda, Jason Robards, Charles Bronson and Claudia Cardinale.

Sergio Leone’s epic Spaghetti Western is widely regarded as a masterpiece. The film follows the story of a battle for ownership of a piece of land in the Old West named Sweetwater. Being the only water source in the region, it is believed to be along the route planned for the new railroad and will bring people, work and money to the land and therefore be very profitable for the owner.

Brett McBain (Frank Wolff) bought the land after he foresaw the huge profits the railroad would bring, but railroad tycoon Morton (Gabriele Ferzetti) decides he wants the land and all the spoils it brings,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Blu-ray Review: Once Upon a Time in the West – An Artful, Intense and Thrilling Epic

Released two years after his iconic, Italian-made “Dollars trilogy” – which launched the career of TV actor Clint Eastwood and created the “Spaghetti Western” sub-genre – 1968′s Once Upon a Time in the West is arguably director Sergio Leone’s crowning achievement. The inspired casting of blue-eyed American great Henry Fonda as a cruel villain is matched by the spectacle of Charles Bronson as the mysterious “Harmonica” and Jason Robards as the likeable gun-slinging outlaw, whilst Ennio Morricone’s score – and an ingenious diegetic sound-scape - upstages everyone in a near three-hour epic with less than 15 pages of dialogue.

In many ways Leone was the original Quentin Tarantino: a dedicated cinephile who made films which consciously referenced those that inspired him. In Once Upon a Time in the West there are clear allusions to the work of John Ford, Howard Hawks and Nicholas Ray, among others. Yet far from being a derivative hack,
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Once Upon a Time in the West Blu-ray Review

  • HeyUGuys
From just the first few minutes into Once Upon a Time in the West its magnificence is immediately evident. What is perhaps Leone’s best western opens with a beautifully orchestrated sequence that sees three unnamed gunmen awaiting the arrival of train and one of its passengers, ‘Harmonica’ (Charles Bronson). Leone builds tension in this scene using every tool at his disposal, most obviously in the effective use of a soundscape that manipulates sound effects and the score so as to control the audience’s reactions down to the finest detail. His almost patented use of wide shots and close-ups also both establishes and develops whilst at the same time never losing any engagement with the viewer. The opening is a lesson in filmmaking from one of cinema’s greatest experts and the excellence on display here continues throughout.

The fact that the film begins with the arrival of a
See full article at HeyUGuys »

"Kiss Me Deadly" and More DVDs

Criterion releases Kiss Me Deadly on DVD and Blu-ray today and, for the occasion, they're running an essay by J Hoberman adapted from his book, An Army of Phantoms: American Movies and the Making of the Cold War: "Genres collide in the great Hollywood movies of the mid fifties cold-war thaw. With the truce in Korea and the red scare on the wane, ambitious directors seemed freer to mix and match and even ponder the new situation. The western goes south in The Searchers; the cartoon merges with the musical in The Girl Can't Help It. Science fiction becomes pop sociology in Invasion of the Body Snatchers. And noir veers into apocalyptic sci-fi in Robert Aldrich's 1955 masterpiece Kiss Me Deadly, which, briefly described, tracks one of the sleaziest, stupidest, most bru tal detectives in American movies through a nocturnal, inexplicably violent labyrinth to a white-hot vision of cosmic annihilation.
See full article at MUBI »

DVD Review: ‘I Am Love’ Captures Revolutionary Power of Romance

Chicago – Critics don’t have any business reviewing films if they aren’t able to admit when they are wrong. I am here to freely admit that I was wrong about “I Am Love.” While it blindsided me at the European Union Film Festival, I detected certain glaring flaws in its plot during the film’s limited theatrical run, which seem to have evaporated upon its magnificent DVD release.

Yes, the film is an unabashed melodramatic romance at heart, requiring the viewer to buy into its less-than-credible flights of fancy. But as an experiment in pure cinema, the film is an extraordinary hybrid of the classical and contemporary. Love is depicted as nothing less than a force of nature, inspiring its central character to evolve into the person she was always meant to be. The film is about revolution rather than repression, and that is its stroke of genius, reflecting
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Blu-Ray Review: John Cassavetes Dazzles in ‘Machine Gun McCain’

Chicago – It’s pretty hard for contemporary audiences to look at a title like “Machine Gun McCain,” and not immediately make a political joke out of it. The most obvious one would be, “What’s the sequel called, “‘Pistol-Packing Palin’?” Of course, this minor cult classic came out long before the 2008 election, and was playing in theaters at the same time John McCain was being held as a prisoner of war in North Vietnam.

The film stars legendary independent filmmaker John Cassavetes, five years after he memorably punched Ronald Reagan in “The Killers.” Cassavetes took acting roles primarily so he could fund his own projects, which were groundbreaking, audacious, uncompromising and fueled entirely by the passion and invention of their cast and crew. That same tireless passion is apparent in several of Cassavetes’s performances, even the ones he was supposedly phoning in. His work in “Machine Gun McCain” single-handedly
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »
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