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John Oliver: How Climbing Mount Everest Has Led to Death, Exploitation

John Oliver: How Climbing Mount Everest Has Led to Death, Exploitation
Climbing Mount Everest used to be a rare achievement guided by a love of nature. Today, it’s often just about the selfie. On Last Week Tonight, John Oliver explored how the popularity of scaling the world’s most iconic summit has spawned an entire commercial industry — leading to myriad physical dangers and devaluing a once-historic achievement through vanity.

Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay became the first known people to summit Mount Everest in 1953 — a seemingly impossible act. But since then, taking the climb has become a popular challenge
See full article at Rolling Stone »

John Oliver Uses Mount Everest Overcrowding to Again Rip Parent Company AT&T, Rickroll Us All (Video)

John Oliver Uses Mount Everest Overcrowding to Again Rip Parent Company AT&T, Rickroll Us All (Video)
John Oliver spent Sunday imploring everyone to shut it down with all this Mount Everest overcrowding. The HBO personality also used the opportunity to (again) rip parent company AT&T — he also Rickrolled the hell out of us.

To accomplish both the Everest thing and probably get himself fired, the “Last Week Tonight” host pulled up footage from Discovery Channel’s 2007 docuseries “Everest: Beyond the Limit,” where a climber named Rod Baber was determined to make the world’s highest cell phone call.

“Nice work, Rod. The highest ever cell phone call — that’s incredible,” Oliver said sarcastically. “Or it would’ve been, but unfortunately, Rod had AT&T, so the phone call never went through.”

Also Read: John Oliver Pushes the Case to Impeach Donald Trump (Video)

That’s gonna make the holiday party uncomfortable. Oliver then got more sincere — for like eight seconds.

“I know I give you a hard time,
See full article at The Wrap »

Paul Simon to Play Hawaii for First Time in 50 Years

Paul Simon to Play Hawaii for First Time in 50 Years
Paul Simon announced two back-to-back concerts in Maui, Hawaii on August 13th and 14th. The performances will take place two days after Simon headlines San Francisco’s Outside Lands Festival — his first concert since he poignantly ended his farewell tour in his hometown of Queens, New York last September.

In keeping with Simon’s commitment to perform sporadic benefit concerts after retirement, the Maui shows are in support of biodiversity conservation. Net proceeds will be donated to The Auwahi Forest Restoration Project and Kua‘āina Ulu ‘Auamo (Kua), while the
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Hunter Foster To Direct Workshop Of The Girl In The Red Dress At Redhouse Arts Center

Saugatuck Productions announces that Hunter Foster 2018 'Director of the Year' by Wall Street Journal will be Director of its new, original musical - The Girl in the Red Dress. Foster will lead the creative team Composers Maia Sharp, Buddy Mondlock, Art Garfunkel Playwright Frederick Stroppel as they conduct a two-week workshop at Redhouse Arts Center in Syracuse, NY. Foster was recently named Artistic Director at Redhouse. The workshop will run from July 15th through the 27th at Redhouse.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

I'm Just Going to Say It: Harry Styles and Stevie Nicks Are the Next Great Musical Duo

I'm Just Going to Say It: Harry Styles and Stevie Nicks Are the Next Great Musical Duo
There was John Lennon and Paul McCartney, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, and even Andre 3000 and Big Boi, but today's talented musical duo is the unexpected pair of Stevie Nicks and Harry Styles, and we really can't get enough of them. Following the Gucci Cruise 2020 Show in Rome, Styles and Nicks hopped on stage to perform her classic hits like "Landslide" and "Stop Draggin' My Heart Around" at the Capitoline Museums. As one of the faces of Gucci, it's no surprise that Styles graced the stage during the afterparty, but when joined by Nicks, they absolutely set the room on fire.

Just in case you haven't been keeping up with this dynamic musical duo, Styles is a longtime fan of Nicks's. During her induction ceremony to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in March, the 25-year-old singer gave a speech, calling her a "magical gypsy godmother" and praising her musical range.
See full article at BuzzSugar »

SXSW Film Review: ‘The Boy Band Con: The Lou Pearlman Story’

  • Variety
SXSW Film Review: ‘The Boy Band Con: The Lou Pearlman Story’
Filmmaker Aaron Kunkel fashions an absorbing true-crime narrative with a danceable beat from the testimonies of exploited pop celebrities, bilked investors, criminal investigators and not-so-quietly aghast onlookers in “The Boy Band Con: The Lou Pearlman Story.” Briskly efficient in its construction and execution, the documentary, which will be available to YouTube Premium subscribers starting April 3, focuses on the high times and low dealings of the Orlando-based music impresario and Ponzi scheme swindler who famously launched the groups *Nsync and Backstreet Boys — and infamously used their success to provide a patina of legitimacy for his complex web of bank and investor fraud.

Kunkel demonstrates his own instinct for showmanship by starting his story in the early 1990s, when Pearlman — a small-time, Queens-born wheeler-dealer who reinvented himself in Florida as head of an air-charter business — culled two groups of teenage hunks from the ranks of young entertainers at Disney World and other Orlando-area tourist attractions,
See full article at Variety »

Lance Bass Is Ready to Help Pull the Veil on Fraudster Lou Pearlman

  • Variety
Disgraced music manager and Ponzi scheme perpetrator Lou Pearlman created the Motown of pop music in the early aughts. He launched two iconic bands, Backstreet Boys and ’N Sync, pitted them against each other for profit and stole millions of dollars from them in the process. Now, former ’N Sync member Lance Bass is ready to talk about how Pearlman did it.

With the documentary “The Boy Band Con: The Lou Pearlman Story,” Bass shines a light on his delirious youth as a teen idol and tells a darker story of the man who made his dreams and the dreams of dozens of young performers come true, often at great cost.

“He was right there at the beginning of the new pop explosion in the late ’90s. He had the vision, and he could’ve had the next Motown if he wasn’t so greedy,” Bass told Variety. The pop
See full article at Variety »

Jules Feiffer Discusses Early Days and #MeToo Movement

  • Variety
Last year, a piece in the Washington Post raised the question, “Is Jules Feiffer Our Greatest Living Cartoonist?” To which Pulitzer Prize-winning “Maus” creator Art Spiegelman replied, “He’s certainly near the very pinnacle, wherever that is.” All of which sounds rather complimentary if it weren’t a somewhat inadequate description of the 89-year-old social satirist extraordinaire’s myriad cultural accomplishments.

As well as creating decades of celebrated work as cartoonist for the Village Voice and Playboy, Feiffer also penned novels and works for stage and film, including screenplays for noted auteurs such as Robert Altman, Mike Nichols and Alain Resnais. More recently, Feiffer penned the screenplay for director Dan Mirvish’s acclaimed 2017 film, “Bernard and Huey.”

Plays derived from his work or written by Feiffer have garnered multiple Tony nominations, including one over a half-century ago for a young actor who’s getting the SAG Life Achievement Award this month: Alan Alda.
See full article at Variety »

Penny Marshall Dead at 75

  • TMZ
Penny Marshall Dead at 75
Penny Marshall, the amazing actress, comedian and director, has died ... TMZ has learned. Marshall died Monday night at her Hollywood Hills home. We've learned the cause of death was complications from diabetes. Penny's first recurring role was playing Myrna Turner on "The Odd Couple," which was directed by her brother. She also appeared on "Happy Days" with Cindy Williams, and they became famous from their spin-off sitcom, "Laverne & Shirley." It became a monster hit in 1976 and ran for 8 seasons.
See full article at TMZ »

"Don't Look Now" 45Th Anniversary Screening, Beverly Hills, December 18

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Laemmle’s Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre in Los Angeles will be presenting a 45th anniversary screening of Nicholas Roeg’s masterful 1973 thriller Don’t Look Now. The 110-minute film stars Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie as recently bereaved parents struggling to cope with the loss of their daughter, based upon the short story of the same name by author Daphne du Maurier and published in the 1971 story collection “Not After Midnight.”

The film will be screened on Tuesday, December 18th, 2018 at 7:30 pm.

Please Note: At press time the film’s cinematographer, Anthony Richmond, is scheduled to participate in a Q&A following the screening. Please Check Back With The Ahrya’S Website For Updates.

From the press release:

Laemmle Theatres and the Anniversary Classics Series present a tribute to director Nicolas Roeg with a screening of his eerie, atmospheric thriller, 'Don’t Look Now.' Roeg,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

John Boyega, James McAvoy’s Bunnies Battle Dark Forces in ‘Watership Down’ First Trailer (Video)

  • The Wrap
The upcoming BBC adaption of the children’s classic “Watership Down” ain’t no fluffy tale.

Voiced by John Boyega, James McAvoy, Nicholas Hoult, Olivia Colman, Ben Kingsley, Gemma Arterton, Daniel Kaluuya, Rosamund Pike, Gemma Chan, Peter Capaldi and Taron Egerton, this daring band of bunnies must join together to battle dark forces in order to survive.

The four-part BBC series follows a group of rabbits who flee their warren to escape destruction. On their journey to find a new home, they face vicious predators predicted by terrifying visions from an all-seeing seer named Fiver (Hoult).

Also Read: Richard Adams, 'Watership Down' Author, Dies at 96

“All the world will be your enemy,” one rabbit warns in the first trailer released Tuesday. “And when they catch you, they will kill you — but first, they must catch you.”

“This isn’t about cute rabbits,” Boyega, who voices Bigwig, warned on Instagram last week.
See full article at The Wrap »

A Beginner’s Guide to Nicolas Roeg

Tom Jolliffe pays tribute to Nicolas Roeg

After the recent sad news about the passing of Nicolas Roeg, now seems like a good moment to focus our latest director beginner’s guide on the visionary filmmaker’s work.

By the time Roeg took the step to directing with his 1970 debut, Performance, he was a veteran camera man and cinematographer. That photo focus and visual eye would become very apparent in his work as a director. Performance was certainly an audacious debut, offering Mick Jagger of The Rolling Stones the lead role, at the height of his rock fame. Roeg would later do the same with David Bowie and Art Garfunkel. Performance is pure cult cinema. Jagger’s performance is a mixed bag, but the film looks amazing. It has an inherent sense of hedonist style as it combines gangster film aesthetics with those of rock music. If you’re going
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Five Best Uses of Paul Simon Songs in Movies or TV

Having had a chance earlier this year to watch Paul Simon live in concert it’s now possible for me to say that even in his older years he knows how to put on one heck of a good show. He met up with Art Garfunkel when was 11 and by the age of 13 they were singing together and already making themselves known to those in their neighborhood. They kind of parted ways as they grew older, going to different colleges but still joining up now and again to perform a few pieces of music that Paul would write. By

The Five Best Uses of Paul Simon Songs in Movies or TV
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Nicolas Roeg, Director of David Bowie's 'The Man Who Fell to Earth,' Dies at 90

Nicolas Roeg, Director of David Bowie's 'The Man Who Fell to Earth,' Dies at 90
Nicolas Roeg, the British cinematographer turned director who employed his visual flair on such films as David Bowie’s The Man Who Fell to Earth and the horror masterpiece Don’t Look Now, has died. He was 90.

Roeg, who also called the shots for two other rock stars, Mick Jagger in Performance (1970) and Art Garfunkel in Bad Timing/A Sensual Obsession (1980), passed away according to the BBC, citing the filmmaker's family.

Roeg, known for the lighting composition, color imagery, manipulation of time and erotic sensibility in his films, spent two decades as a camera operator and cinematographer before graduating ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Dancing About Architecture: Luca Guadagnino and "Suspiria"

  • MUBI
How much importance do we really put on stylishness? The Italian director Luca Guadagino’s semi-official “trilogy of desire”—I Am Love, A Bigger Splash (apt title), and Call Me By Your Name—sloshed with the stuff, deploying voracious camera moves to tell its stories of craving and beauty, connected by a nebulous theme and a mission of tackling the sublime through superficial means; with each film, his filmmaking and pictorial eye seemed to become more confident and subtle. These movies made it easy to categorize Guadagino as an evolving sensualist who used appetites as metaphors; his characters hankered for ukha soup and picked at salt-baked fish, but we got that they were really wanting for something more.The nature of that something could be wishy-washy, but Guadagnino’s growing talent for ekphrastic editing and camera movement was clear. What’s more, his characters were super-rich or at least privileged; compared to our own unfulfillments,
See full article at MUBI »

Beatles Engineer Geoff Emerick Dies at 72

Tony Sokol Oct 3, 2018

Geoff Emerick helped change the way sound is captured in the recording studio.

The Beatles were well known for flouting official rules in order to push the limits of what could be captured on tape, and Geoff Emerick was one of their greatest enablers. Recording engineer and producer Geoff Emerick, best known for his work with the Beatles, died of a heart attack at the age of 72, according to Variety.

“Today, at around 2’o’clock, I was making my way back from Arizona to Los Angeles to go pick up Geoff so we could transport some gold records and platinum plaques to our show in Tucson,” Emerick's manager William Zabaleta said in a statement.

“While on the phone with Geoff Emerick, he had complications, dropped the phone. At that point I called 911, but by the time they got there it was too late. So Geoff suffered from
See full article at Den of Geek »

Paul Simon Closes Out Farewell Tour With Euphoric Hometown Show

Paul Simon Closes Out Farewell Tour With Euphoric Hometown Show
Two songs into his set at Flushing Meadows Corona Park on the final stop of his Homeward Bound Farewell Tour, Paul Simon put down his guitar and put on a black baseball glove. “This is like two miles from where I played high school baseball,” he said. “It’s little dark out, but you know what? I’m going to play a quick game of catch.” He then lobbed the ball into the New York crowd and urged whoever caught it to throw it back. It took three attempts, but
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Flashback: Paul Simon and Chevy Chase’s Hilarious ‘You Can Call Me Al’ Video

Flashback: Paul Simon and Chevy Chase’s Hilarious ‘You Can Call Me Al’ Video
Paul Simon and Chevy Chase are both getting a lot of press attention this week, but for extremely different reasons. Simon is wrapping up his Homeward Bound farewell tour with a series of emotional shows in New York, culminating with a blowout at Flushing Meadows Corona Park near his childhood home in Kew Gardens Hills, Queens. His old friend Chevy, meanwhile, gave an interview to the Washington Post where he calls the current incarnation of Saturday Night Live “the worst fucking humor in the world” among many, many other things
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Jack Nicholson movies: 45 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Cuckoo’s Nest,’ ‘Chinatown,’ ‘The Shining’

Jack Nicholson movies: 45 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Cuckoo’s Nest,’ ‘Chinatown,’ ‘The Shining’
While an English-language version of Germany’s 2016 foreign-language contender “Toni Erdmann” doesn’t feel all that necessary, it would have been interesting to see how Jack Nicholson would have handled the prankish pop who stalks his workaholic daughter. But now it seems that Jack-o, who came up with the idea for the re-do, is no longer involved in the project. Rumors about memory loss and retirement are out there.

But, taking a cue from the title of the last movie he appeared in, 2010’s “How Do You Know,” how do we know? When I talked to Nicholson for this reunion with director James L. Brooks – an unfortunate flop – I asked him why he waited three years to do another movie after his hit, “The Bucket List.” His response: “I’ve been reading scripts. Yes, they are all very similar. You just keep getting these stories about retirement, or the wife
See full article at Gold Derby »

An Aretha Franklin Appreciation: Why the Queen of Soul Will Rule Forever

  • Variety
An Aretha Franklin Appreciation: Why the Queen of Soul Will Rule Forever
Twenty years ago at the 1998 Grammy Awards, the unsinkable Aretha Franklin did what, for many, may have been the unthinkable. She filled in for an ailing Luciano Pavarotti and performed the aria “Nessun Dorma” from the Giacomo Puccini opera “Turandot.”

This wasn’t just the equivalent of Celine Dion stepping in for Barbra Streisand at the 1997 Oscars or Faith Hill covering for Whitney Houston at the Academy’s request in 2000. This was the Queen of Soul tackling classical music.

It was one of those hold-your-breath-and-then-lose-it moments. The fear that she couldn’t possibly pull it off was followed by relief, then astonishment, then pride, because she did. Franklin brought the house down and the entire audience up to their feet for what would go down as one of the most memorable performances in Grammy history.

Sadly, there will be no more unforgettable performances from Franklin. The 76-year-old singer died on
See full article at Variety »
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