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Film Review: Scoop! (2016) by Hitoshi One

The concept of journalism and its role in the modern, social media era has been an issue addressed quite frequently, in films like “The Journalist” , “The Exclusive: Beat the Devil’s Tattoo” and even this year’s “Reiwa Uprising“. Based on Masato Harada’s 1985 feature, “Out of Focus, Scoop!”, Hitoshi One’s film throws its two cents about the concept through a rather entertaining approach that benefits the film the most.

Shizuka Miyakonojo is a 40-something paparazzi photographer, who is very skilled with camera, but also an irreparable gambler that has amassed a huge debt, which actually forces him to continue hunting celebrities for the latest scoop to sell to Sadako Yokogawa, chief editor of a tabloid magazine. Yokogawa seems to be more than an associate however, and somewhere amidst the rather peculiar relationship she has with Shizuka, she “forces” him to take Nobi Namekawa, a rookie reporter,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Trailer for New Masato Harada Film Moeyo Ken

Japanese director Masato Harada most recent project “Moeyo Ken” is set for release on May 20th 2020. The film is based off of the real life historical figure Toshizo Hijikata. Actor Junichi Okada who previously worked with Harada on “Sekigahara” plays the role of Toshizo Hijikata. A trailer for the production has been made available and can be viewed below.

Synopsis

Set in the 19th century, “Moeyo Ken” follows the life of Toshizo Hijikata (Junichi Okada). He was the vice-commander of the Shinsengumi and fought against the Meiji Restoration. (AsianWiki)
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Toho Unveils Dual Media Romance ‘Love Me, Love Me Not’ at Tokyo Market

  • Variety
Japan’s biggest film company, which produces, distributes and exhibits its own product in partnership with leading media companies, Toho has brought a line-up to Tiffcom full of present and future hits.

The biggest is “Weathering with You,” the love story animation by Makoto Shinkai that surpassed the $100 million mark only a month after its July 2019 release. Its worldwide box office, with distribution in 135 countries, now totals $380 million.

Also high on the line-up is “Love Me, Love Me Not,” an ambitious dual-media project that includes an animation produced by A-1 Pictures, and a live-action film directed by romance genre veteran Takahiro Miki. Both are based Io Sakisaka’s hit comic about four high school students – two guys and two girls — who have complex family situations and tangled feelings about each other. The endings, however, are different, motivating fans to experience both anime and film. Release is set for 2020.

Targeting an
See full article at Variety »

The 38th Hawaii International Film Festival (Hiff 2018) has Loads of Asian Titles

Oahunov Nov 8-18, 2018

Kauainov Nov 15-18, 2018

Big Island & Maui Nov 29 -Dec 2, 2018

The 38th Hawaii International Film Festival is about to start and to continue the festival’s proud tradition of showcasing content and creatives from the Pacific, Asia and North America.

The festival this year features over 180 films, talks and events from 37 countries, with 47 Us, International and World Premieres across 32 sections. 2018 continues the tradition of programming a selection of critically-acclaimed and highly-anticipated films from Asia and around the world, while also giving a platform from emerging creative talents from across the Hawaii-Pacific region.

Outstanding films are accompanied by stars and filmmakers from around the world, connecting East and West through a dedication to discussion, diversity and creativity.

We have picked the Asian titles in the Programme and they are a lot!

Let’s have a look:

Shadow – Opening Night Film

China 2018 – Director: Zhang Yimou

50 First Kisses

Spotlight On Japan – Japan
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

‘We’re explorers trying to find films that would be criminal to ignore’ – Nyaff heads on how the festival stands out

New York Asian Film Festival heads on global trawl for content, festival blind spots, ‘fear of China’.

As the 17th New York Asian Film Festival (Nyaff) enters its final weekend, executive director Samuel Jamier and deputy director Stephen Cremin discuss why premieres aren’t always the be-all-and-end-all, the ‘fear of China’, Nyaff’s faithful audience, and international festival blind spots.

Presented by Film Society Of Lincoln Center and Subway Cinema and backed by a range of Asian bodies and New York-based private donors, the event runs from June 29-July 15 at Film Society Of Lincoln Center.

This year’s edition closes
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Film Review: Kamikaze Taxi (1995) by Masato Harada

“Kamikaze Taxi” isn’t the film you think it is. It starts out with documentary style footage and then it slides into feature narrative and stays there. This format shift is perhaps a clue as to what kind of movie you are really sitting down to, which isn’t a yakuza film, a road movie or a documentary. It’s a unique mashup of style and story that takes you on an odd yet unique journey for two hours and twenty minutes into the life of two Japanese men on the run.

Kamikaze Taxi is screening at the 17th New York Asian Film Festival

The story that “Kamikaze Taxi” tells is about a Japanese man recently returned to Japan, having lived most of his life in Peru. Working as a taxi driver, Kantake (Kôji Yakusho), is a man out of touch with his Japanese heritage. He meets a young punk,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Film Review: Kakekomi (2015) by Masato Harada

Jidaigeki (period dramas) films that focus on the lives of women during the Edo period are definitely an exception among the vast number of entries in the field. Masato Harada’s movie is one of these exceptions, in a wonderful production based on the novel “Tokeiji Hanadayori” by Hisashi Inoue.

Kakekomi is screening at the 17th New York Asian Film Festival

The story takes place near the ending of the Edo period (1841), during a time when the divorce rate was two times higher than the current one. The local government, in an explosion of conservatism, has issued an austerity law, actually criminalizing a number of forms of arts and entertainment, making the lives of common people even worse. At the same time, since divorce is a concept forbidden, a number of women find solace at a women’s Buddhist temple in Kamakura named Tokei-ji, where, after two years of servitude,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

The Arthouse Meets the Grindhouse at the New York Asian Film Festival

Little ForestThe New York Asian Film Festival, now in its 17th year, has become the premiere showcase for East and Southeast Asian cinema in North America. From a modest selection of a mere eleven films in its first year (2002), the festival has grown in both size and scope: this year’s selection includes 58 films from across the continent, an eclectic mix of arthouse and grindhouse, a bold survey of popular and independent cinema from one of the most vibrant and exciting corners of the world. While most of the films are new, including several North American premieres, the festival includes some archival films, including mini-retrospectives on the work of directors Masato Harada and Dante Lam. Thanks to the magic of the Internet and online screeners, I was able to sample a handful of titles from this year’s Nyaff from my home, thousands of miles away from Lincoln Center. I
See full article at MUBI »

Film Review: Sekigahara (2017) by Masato Harada

Probably one of the most anticipated Japanese films of the year, “Sekigahara” deals with the homonymous battle that took place in 1600, and ended the Warring States era, establishing the Tokugawa shogunate.

Sekigahara is screening at the Toronto Japanese Film Festival

The movie is split in two parts. The first one narrates the events that brought the Western and the Eastern Army facing each other, and established the two main opponents on a personal level, Mitsunari Ishida, who defended the rights of Hideyori, son of Hideyoshi Toyotomi, and Tokugawa Ieyasu, who wanted the shogunate for himself. Through a number of political movements, treacheries and cunningness, we watch the desperate efforts of the two men to secure as many allies as possible, since the inevitable civil war was looming over the country.

The second part deals with the battle itself, examining the various stages that occurred and the constant change of allies
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

The Emperor in August

This great recent Japanese epic is all but unknown here — and is the kind of adult historical show that we seem incapable of these days. The intense diplomatic storm at the end of WW2 with an Army command willing to sacrifice the nation in a national suicide pact, is given an exciting, thoughtful treatment

The Emperor in August

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

2015 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 136 min. / Street Date August 15, 2017 / Nihon no ichiban nagai hi ketteiban / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Koji Yakusho, Masahiro Motoki, Tsutomu Yamazaki, Shin’ichi Tsutsumi, Tori Matsuzaka, Kikuo Kaneuchi, Misuzu Kanno, Katsumi Kiba.

Cinematography: Takahide Shibanushi

Film Editor: Eugene Harada

Original Music: Harumi Fuki

Based on the novel by Kacutoshi Hando

Produced by Hirotaki Aragaki, Nozumi Enoki

Written and Directed by Masato Harada

How does Twilight Time do it? Every time they offer a foreign title I’ve never heard of, it comes up a winner.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Tokyo festival announces four 'Muses' for 30th anniversary edition

  • ScreenDaily
Tokyo festival announces four 'Muses' for 30th anniversary edition
Sakura Ando, Yu Aoi, Hikari Mitsushima and Aoi Miyazaki to be feted.

Tokyo International Film Festival is highlighting the work of four Japanese actresses – Sakura Ando, Yu Aoi, Hikari Mitsushima and Aoi Miyazaki – in this year’s Japan Now section.

The highlight, ‘Muses of Japanese Cinema’, is one of the special programmes that the festival is planning to celebrate its 30th anniversary. The four actresses have won acclaim in recent years for the high standard of their work, collaborations with renowned directors and increasing international status.

Ando won multiple awards for 2015 releases 0.5 mm and 100 Yen Love, while Aoi’s credits include Over the Fence (2016) and Japanese Girls Never Die (2016).

Mitsushima gained worldwide attention in Sion Sono’s Love Exposure (2009) and recently starred in Traces Of Sin (2017). Miyazaki’s recent credits include Sang-il Lee’s Rage (2016) and Yasuhiro Yoshida’s Birthday Card (2016).

In addition to screenings of films featuring the selected actresses, Tokyo will host
See full article at ScreenDaily »

58th Blue Ribbon Awards : Here Are The Winners

The Blue Ribbon Awards are film-specific prizes awarded solely by movie critics and writers in Tokyo, Japan.

The awards were established in 1950 by The Association of Tokyo Film Journalists which is composed of film correspondents from seven Tokyo-based sports newspapers. In 1961, the six major Japanese newspapers (Yomiuri Shinbun, Asahi Shinbun, Mainichi Shinbun, Sankei Shimbun, Tokyo Shimbun andNihon Keizai Shinbun) as well as the Japanese Associated Press withdrew their support for the Blue Ribbon Awards and established the Association of Japanese Film Journalists Awards, (which were held a mere six times). In 1967, the awards were cancelled as a result of the Black Mist Scandal, a baseball bribing case. In 1975, the awards were revived, and have continued until the present day. The annual award ceremony is held in a variety of places in Tokyo every February.

Although the award is not acclaimed highly on an international level, due to their long history and the rigorous screening process,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

The 70th Mainichi Film Awards : Here are the winners and a brief history of the awards

The awards were first introduced in 1946 by the Mainichi Shinbun (毎日新聞) newspaper, which is the oldest daily Japanese one, since it has been on circulation since 1872. Nowadays, it is one of the three largest in the country, and it is noteworthy that two of its general directors were elected Prime Ministers.

The first winners were:

Best Film: Aru yo no tonosama (Teinosuke Kinugasa)

Best Firector: Tadashi Imai (Minshu no teki)

Best Script: Osone ke no ashita (Eijiro Hisaita)

Best Actor: Eitaro Ozawa (Osone ke no ashita)

Best Soundtrack: Minshu no teki (Fumio Hayasaka)

Since 1962, a year after the death of Noburo Ofuji, one of the pioneers of Japanese anime, a new award was introduced in his name, for the best anime of the season. The first winner was Osamu Tezuka, with “Story of a Certain Street Corner.”With the rise of the anime industry during the 80’s, the major studios started dominating the award,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

28th Nikkan Sports Film Awards

The 28th ceremony took place at the New Otani Hotel, in Tokyo and the list of winners is:

Best Film: Solomon’s Perjury (Izuru Narashima)

Best Director: Masato Harada (The Emperor in August, Kakekomi)

Best Actor: Kengo Kora (TheMourner, Being Good)

Best Actress: Haruka Ayase (Our Little Sister)

Best Supporting Actor: Masahiro Motoki (The Emperor in August, The Big Bee)

Best Supporting Actress: Masami Nagasawa (Our Little Sister)

Best International Film: Whiplash (Damien Chazelle)

New Face Award: Suzu Hirose (Our Little Sister)

Fan Award: Joker Game (Yu Irie)

Yujiro Ishihara Award: The Emperor in August

Achievement Award: Yukichi Shinada (film critic)

Kengo Kora

Masami Nagasawa

the winners
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Androids, heritage in the frame at Tokyo fest

  • ScreenDaily
Androids, heritage in the frame at Tokyo fest
An android actress, giant anime robots and the legacy of Akira Kurosawa were among the offerings at this year’s Tokyo International Film Festival (Tiff), which as always presented an interesting mix of old and new.

Android Geminoid-f – created by robotics expert Hiroshi Ishiguro – is an eerily convincing lead actress in Koji Fukada’s Sayonara, which received its world premiere in Tiff’s competition section.

Both Geminoid-f and Japanese-speaking actress Bryerly Long are reprising their roles from the short stage-play from which the film is adapted.

Although set in a near-future Japan contaminated by radiation, the film is more of a riff on mortality and the fear of death than a comment on the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

More startling than the story was the range of emotions that Geminoid-f was able to convey. “Sometimes robots can express more than humans,” said Ishiguro at a post-screening event.

Gundam focus

The giant robots came courtesy of a focus on iconic
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Androids, heritage in the frame at Tokyo fest

  • ScreenDaily
Androids, heritage in the frame at Tokyo fest
An android actress, giant anime robots and the legacy of Akira Kurosawa were among the offerings at this year’s Tokyo International Film Festival (Tiff), which as always presented an interesting mix of old and new.

Android Geminoid-f – created by robotics expert Hiroshi Ishiguro – is an eerily convincing lead actress in Koji Fukada’s Sayonara, which received its world premiere in Tiff’s competition section. Both Geminoid-f and Japanese-speaking actress Bryerly Long are reprising their roles from the short stage-play that the film is adapted from.

Although set in a near-future Japan contaminated by radiation, the film is more of a riff on mortality and the fear of death than a comment on the Fukushima nuclear disaster. More startling than the story was the range of emotions that Geminoid-f was able to convey. “Sometimes robots can express more than humans,” said Ishiguro at a post-screening event.

The giant robots came courtesy of a focus on iconic Japanese
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Tokyo unveils Competition line-up

Competition section features six world premieres including titles from Koji Fukada and Yoshihiro Nakamura.

The 28th Tokyo International Film Festival (October 22-31) has unveiled its line-up with six world premieres in the Competition section, including Turkish director Mustafa Kara’s Cold Of Kalandar, Hao Jie’s My Original Dream and Thai film-maker Kongdej Jaturanrasmee’s Snap.

Also world-premiering in Competition are three Japanese titles: Kohei Oguri’s Foujita, Yoshihiro Nakamura’s The Inerasable and Koji Fukada’s Sayonara – the most local films in the main section since 2004.

The other selections are either Asian or international premieres. The topics of war or refugeeism are a common thread among some films, echoing current day headlines. “We were not conscious about choosing those types, it just happened that way and we noticed afterwards,” said Competition programming director Yoshi Yatabe.

“As much as possible we’d like to cover a wide range of geographical areas and genres,” he said of
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Tokyo International Film Festival unveils Competition line-up

Competition section features six world premieres including titles from Koji Fukada and Yoshihiro Nakamura.

The 28th Tokyo International Film Festival (October 22-31) has unveiled its line-up with six world premieres in the Competition section, including Turkish director Mustafa Kara’s Cold Of Kalandar, Hao Jie’s My Original Dream and Thai film-maker Kongdej Jaturanrasmee’s Snap.

Also world-premiering in Competition are three Japanese titles: Kohei Oguri’s Foujita, Yoshihiro Nakamura’s The Inerasable and Koji Fukada’s Sayonara – the most local films in the main section since 2004.

The other selections are either Asian or international premieres. The topics of war or refugeeism are a common thread among some films, echoing current day headlines. “We were not conscious about choosing those types, it just happened that way and we noticed afterwards,” said Competition programming director Yoshi Yatabe.

“As much as possible we’d like to cover a wide range of geographical areas and genres,” he said of
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Three Japanese titles in Tokyo fest competition

Selection represents highest number of Japanese films in more than a decade.

The 28th Tokyo International Film Festival (Oct. 22-31) has chosen three Japanese titles for its main competition, the highest number of local films it has selected for its top section for 11 years.

Veteran helmer Kohei Oguri’s Foujita portrays Japanese artist Tsuguhara Foujita’s life in Paris in the 1920s; Koji Fukada’s Sayonara centres on an ill woman and her android caretaker; and Yoshihiro Nakamura’s The Inerasable follows a novelist and her investigation of a series of eerie deaths.

“I feel that the quality seen in recent Japanese films is extremely rich and on par with those seen in international cinema,” said Yoshi Yatabe, Tiff’s competition programming director.

“By mixing three different types of directors, we wanted to showcase the strength and diversity we see in today’s Japanese cinema.”

This year, 1,409 titles from 86 territories were submitted for consideration. The rest of
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Toronto Japanese 2015: Grand Jury Prize And Kobayashi Audience Choice Award Announced

TwitchFilm is honored to have the distinction of announcing the award winners from this year's edition of the the Toronto Japanese Film Festival. By all accounts the festival continues to grow in popularity, it was their biggest festival so far. Kazuyoshi Kumakiri's My Man, starring perennial TwitchFilm favorite Tadanobu Asano, took home the Jury Prize. And it is no surprise that Shinobu Yaguchi, director of crowd pleasers like Waterboys, Swing Girls and Robo-g, enchanted the crowd in Toronto with his latest film Wood Job! and won the audience award. The full press release follows. Kazuyoshi Kumakiri's My Man and Shinobu Yaguchi's Wood Job! Take Major Awards at 2015 Toronto Japanese Film Festival. Masato Harada's Kakekomi also HonouredKazuyoshi Kumakiri's My Man was selected the winner of the Grand Jury Prize...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »
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