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MTV VMAs: Missy Elliott to Be Honored With 2019 Video Vanguard Award

MTV VMAs: Missy Elliott to Be Honored With 2019 Video Vanguard Award
Missy Elliott will be honored at this year’s MTV Video Music Awards with the Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award. The show’s version of a Lifetime Achievement Award has been handed out since the inaugural VMAs in 1984, where David Bowie, the Beatles and Richard Lester were the first winners.

Over the course of her career, Elliott has been nominated for 41 VMAs, winning seven. This year will mark the rapper’s first performance at the VMAs since 2003, when she performed “Work It” after the “scandalous” kiss between Madonna and Britney Spears
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award Will Go to Missy Elliott at 2019 VMAs

Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award Will Go to Missy Elliott at 2019 VMAs
The MTV Video Music Awards’ “Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award” shall remain named the “Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award” — and the next recipient of the accolade has been announced.

Rapper Missy Elliott will be honored with the Video Vanguard Award at the 2019 VMAs, to be held Monday, Aug. 26 at the Prudential Center in Newark, N.J. and air live on MTV; comedian/actor Sebastian Maniscalco will serve as host.

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Elliott will
See full article at TVLine.com »

Should MTV Remove Michael Jackson's Name From Video Vanguard Award?

MTV is said to be thinking about removing the King of Pop’s name from the Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award given out at the the VMAs. Would that be the right call?

The equivalent to a lifetime achievement honor, the first Vanguard Awards were handed out in 1984 at the inaugural MTV Video Music Awards, to David Bowie, The Beatles and A Hard Day’s Night director Richard Lester. In 1991, three years after Jackson himself was bestowed with the award, it was renamed the Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award.

More from TVLineThe Hills Recap: Is Mischa Barton's Comeback Going According to Plan?
See full article at TVLine.com »

Letters: Freddie Jones obituary

While Freddie Jones gave a memorable television performance as Claudius in The Caesars in 1968, also significant in his emergence as an actor was his portrayal of the troubled Ludovic in Donald McWhinnie’s landmark production of Evelyn Waugh’s Sword of Honour trilogy on BBC2 the previous year. He was much admired by Clint Eastwood, who cast him in several films, providing Freddie with a host of anecdotes that he told with his customary brio.

Graham Benson

Freddie Jones gave an extraordinary performance as a most ordinary man in the underrated Juggernaut, Richard Lester’s disaster movie of 1974. It’s impossible to detail without spoilers, and the film should be seen: as Jones turns his timeworn retiree from public life into a master craftsman of the devious, the ensemble cast of unsuspecting leading characters fades into the background. It’s right to say that Jones could play sinister as well as humble,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Shanghai Film Review: ‘We Are Little Zombies’

  • Variety
Shanghai Film Review: ‘We Are Little Zombies’
No pulsating, psychedelic, pop-punk phantasmagoria ought to be as moving and smart as “We Are Little Zombies.” But Makoto Nagahisa’s explosively ingenious and energetic debut (imagine it as the spiritual offspring of Richard Lester and a Harajuku Girl) holds the high score for visual and narrative invention, as well as boasting a [insert gigantic-beating-heart Gif] and braaaains, too. The gonzo adventures of four poker-faced Japanese 13-year-olds who bond over their mutual lack of emotion following sudden orphanhood, it reimagines the old “stages of grief” thing as a progression through 13 erratic levels of a video game, complete with mini-games and side quests. And if its manic, 8-bit aesthetic seems hyperactively inappropriate for such a somber scenario — like it does grief wrong — that too, can be interpreted as a generous insight into the mourning process: Who among us, upon being bereaved, has ever believed they’re doing grief right?

Certainly, little Hikari (Keita Ninomiya) does not.
See full article at Variety »

Academy’s 11th Governors Awards Moved Up to October 27, as Elections Loom

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Board of Governors will meet early Saturday to select their choices for the 11th annual Governors Awards. The special meeting is three months earlier than the usual post-Telluride Labor Day weekend date because the Academy — along with the rest of its accelerated calendar — has moved up the date for the Governors Awards from November 16 to Sunday, October 27. The nearly three-week jump backward reflects a similar shift for the February 9, 2020 Oscars.

The Governors’ Ball is a non-televised awards program that always draws a sizable contingent of Oscar contenders to the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood and Highland to celebrate the honorary Oscar winners as well as the occasional Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award and Irving J. Thalberg Memorial Awards.

The changed date comes partly because outgoing AMPAS president John Bailey (the board will elect his successor in August) wanted a hand in the selection.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Academy’s 11th Governors Awards Moved Up to October 27, as Elections Loom

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Board of Governors will meet early Saturday to select their choices for the 11th annual Governors Awards. The special meeting is three months earlier than the usual post-Telluride Labor Day weekend date because the Academy — along with the rest of its accelerated calendar — has moved up the date for the Governors Awards from November 16 to Sunday, October 27. The nearly three-week jump backward reflects a similar shift for the February 9, 2020 Oscars.

The Governors’ Ball is a non-televised awards program that always draws a sizable contingent of Oscar contenders to the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood and Highland to celebrate the honorary Oscar winners as well as the occasional Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award and Irving J. Thalberg Memorial Awards.

The changed date comes partly because outgoing AMPAS president John Bailey (the board will elect his successor in August) wanted a hand in the selection.
See full article at Indiewire »

Tribeca Film Review: ‘I Want My MTV’

  • Variety
The first thing you want from a history of MTV is to get dunked in the hot-but-cool nostalgia of it, and the fast, fleet documentary “I Want My MTV” delivers those 1980s goods about as good as you can get. Here’s “Video Killed the Radio Star,” the novelty single by the Buggles that launched the channel on Aug. 1, 1981 — a tune that, in hindsight, sounds as sing-song catchy in its percolating bliss as a Divertimento by Mozart. Here are the five original VJs — shaggy Mark Goodman, earnest Alan Hunter, snarky Martha Quinn, jovial J.J. Jackson, and hipstery Nina Blackwood — fumbling around against a set that looks more like Wayne Campbell’s basement than a television studio, tossing off we’re-making-this-up-on-the-spot-and-we-know-it patter that became the casual formative version of “attitude.”

Here are those primitive early days when for every music video that was made with flair, like the S&M-flavored Old
See full article at Variety »

David V. Picker, Legendary Studio Chief, Dead At Age 87

  • CinemaRetro
David Picker and his wife Sandy at a book party for release of his memoirs in Beverly Hills, 2013.

By Lee Pfeiffer

David V. Picker, whose tenure at major film studios and as an independent producer, made him a legend in the film industry, has died from colon cancer in New York at age 87. The Picker family lived and breathed movies and in the 1950s they ran United Artists under the leadership of Arthur Krim. Under Krim and the Pickers, UA entered a "Golden Age" of achievements. David, who was named head of production at an early age, showed an uncanny ability to attract top talent and produce films that were popular and critical successes. He was ultimately named President and COO of the company. During his tenure, UA brought to the screen films that were diverse in content including "West Side Story", "The Magnificent Seven", "The Great Escape", "In the Heat of the Night
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Superman II - Wtf Happened To This Movie? (video)

  • JoBlo
In this recurring series, we'll be taking a look at a variety of films that had historically troubled productions or controversial problems in making it to the big screen. Some were massive hits despite their problems, while others died a slow box office death. Regardless of where they ended up, we have to ask the question: Wtf happened to this movie? This episode we dive into the tumultuous production of Superman II, which saw director Richard Donner fired and replaced by Richard Lester,…
See full article at JoBlo »

The Monkees' Peter Tork Dies at 77

Tony Sokol Feb 21, 2019

Multi-instrumentalist Peter Tork insisted The Monkees play their own music on the pre-fab four's records.

Peter Tork of the 1960s TV-band-turned-real-band The Monkees, died from complications of a rare form of cancer on Thursday at a family home in eastern Connecticut. He was 77.

"Our beloved Peter passed away peacefully today at the age of 77. His talent, charm and humor were undeniable and he had the rare honor of bringing joy and music to multiple generations. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family, friends and fans around the world.," an announcement on The Monkees' official Facebook page reads.

"Peter Tork died this Am. I am told he slipped away peacefully," Michael Nesmith said in a statement. "Yet, as I write this my tears are awash, and my heart is broken. Even though I am clinging to the idea that we all continue, the pain that attends these passings has no cure.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Kevin Smith Spills A Ton Of New Details On Zack Snyder’s Justice League Trilogy

When it comes to the Justice League movie that we ultimately received in theaters, I remain somewhat indifferent on the subject. Granted, I found it to be a very fun and entertaining viewing experience, though I felt it wasn’t quite the epic that DC’s A-list characters deserved. This, of course, was due to it being the product of two directors – Zack Snyder and Joss Whedon – not to mention a studio committee. The fact that something coherent came out in the end is nothing short of a miracle.

Admittedly, I’m nowhere near the likes of those who light up Twitter threads with demands of Warner Bros. releasing the Snyder cut, yet I’ll forever remain curious as to how Zack’s original vision would’ve turned out. Hey, if we received Superman II: The Richard Donner Cut 25 years after Richard Lester’s effort hit theaters, then I think
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Ten Great Movie Music Moments by Michel Legrand

  • Variety
Ten Great Movie Music Moments by Michel Legrand
Michel Legrand, who died in Paris Saturday at the age of 86, was among the most renowned film composers and songwriters of our time. He won three Oscars and five Grammys, and many of his songs have entered the pantheon as among the greatest of the 20th century. Here are 10 great film music moments from the career of this French genius:

1. “The Umbrellas of Cherbourg” (1964). The close collaboration of Legrand and filmmaker Jacques Demy produced this stunning, all-sung romantic drama about a star-crossed couple. It won the Palme d’Or at Cannes and ultimately earned five Oscar nominations (three of them for the score). “I Will Wait for You” was the biggest song hit that emerged and quickly became a standard:

2. “The Young Girls of Rochefort” (1967). Legrand and Demy reunited for this splashy, colorful musical that added Americans Gene Kelly and George Chakiris to the usual French cast. The tuneful score
See full article at Variety »

Kaye Ballard, Star of ‘The Mothers-in-Law,’ Dies at 93

  • Variety
Kaye Ballard, Star of ‘The Mothers-in-Law,’ Dies at 93
Singer-comedienne Kaye Ballard, who starred alongside Eve Arden in the 1960s sitcom “The Mothers-in-Law” and was among the stars of the 1976 feature based on Terrence McNally’s farce “The Ritz,” died Monday in Rancho Mirage, Calif. She was 93.

She had recently attended a screening of a documentary about her life, “Kaye Ballard: The Show Goes On,” at the Palm Springs Film Festival, according to the Desert Sun, and became ill soon after.

Ballard’s career spanned stage and screen, and she was a star on Broadway when she was paired with Arden as neighbors whose kids get married on “The Mothers-in-Law,” which ran on NBC from 1967-69 and later in syndication.

On the show Ballard played Katherine “Kaye” Josephina Buell, the overly emotional wife of Roger Buell (played by Roger C. Carmel) and overprotective mother of Jerry Buell (Jerry Fogel). She was an unenthusiastic housewife, frequently spoke in Italian, and
See full article at Variety »

Superman: The Movie Director Planned To Introduce Brainiac In Sequels

The behind the scenes upheaval that plagued Christopher Reeves Superman films is legendary to fans. Though Richard Donner helmed 1978’s classic Superman: The Movie and made it a barnstorming success, the producers fell out with him during production on Superman II, causing him to be replaced by Richard Lester and making the final cut of the sequel something of a blend between Donner’s style and Lester’s more light-hearted approach.

Lester was retained for Superman III as well, which everyone agrees is far inferior to the two movies that came before, probably due to the absence of Donner and his screenwriting partner Tom Mankiewicz. And now, in a recent interview, Donner’s revealed what he would have done in the third film and it definitely sounds a whole lot better than what we got. In short, he would’ve introduced one of the Man of Steel’s greatest enemies,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Review: “De Niro & De Palma: The Early Films”; Blu-ray Special Edition from Arrow

  • CinemaRetro
“Young Rebel With A Movie Camera”

By Raymond Benson

Arrow has released an interesting time capsule of a boxed set that features early work by director Brian De Palma and starring a very young Robert De Niro before either of them were significant names in the motion picture industry. The films are The Wedding Party, Greetings (1968), and Hi, Mom! (1970).

De Palma had embarked on a film career in the very early 1960s when he was a student at various institutions. While at Sarah Lawrence College in New York, he collaborated with then-theatre-professor Wilford Leach and Cynthia Munroe (who provided much of the script and funding) to make a feature entitled The Wedding Party. Most accounts (including IMDb) state that the movie was made in 1963; however, an essay by Brad Stevens in the accompanying Blu-ray booklet claims that the film was shot in 1964-65. It was eventually copyrighted in 1966, but wasn
See full article at CinemaRetro »

"Once I had it all. Now I just have everything": Nicolas Roeg Remembered

  • MUBI
It has become a cliché to quote the age-old maxim that you should never meet your heroes. I am also of the belief that you should never write about meeting them either. But I am going to make an exception for Nicolas Roeg, who passed away aged 90 on November 26, 2018. It’s commonly accepted, and certainly in the tributes that have flowed since his death, that Roeg was a genius of the cinema. In his lifetime he was not always held in such lofty regard, as his longtime friend and producing associate Jeremy Thomas was swift to point out when he chastised the U.K. film establishment for its neglect of one of its most visionary talents. “Roeg was one of the major figures but he wasn’t supported by the British Film Industry. There is something about our culture that we don’t revere our greatest filmmakers, especially if they
See full article at MUBI »

Rip Nicolas Roeg

  • SneakPeek
Director, cinematographer Nicolas Roeg, noted for the features "Don't Look Now", "The Man Who Fell To Earth" And "Performance" has died:

Roeg started out as an editing apprentice, then worked his way up to become a second unit Dp on director David Lean's "Lawrence of Arabia" (1962)...

...followed by Roger Corman's "The Masque of the Red Death" (1964)...

...François Truffaut's "Fahrenheit 451" (1966)...

...John Schlesinger's "Far from the Madding Crowd" (1967)...

...and Richard Lester's "Petulia" (1968).

Roeg made his co-directing debut with "Performance" (1970)...

...then went to Australia to solo direct and film the classic "Walkabout" (1971) starring Jenny Agutter.

Throughout the 1970's, Roeg produced an impressive amount of work, including "Don't Look Now" (1973) starring Donald Sutherland...

....and "The Man Who Fell to Earth" (1976) starring David Bowie.

Click the images to enlarge and Sneak Peek the films of Nicolas Roeg...
See full article at SneakPeek »

Nicolas Roeg Dies: Film Director For ‘The Man Who Fell To Earth’ Was 90

  • Deadline
Nicolas Roeg Dies: Film Director For ‘The Man Who Fell To Earth’ Was 90
Idiosyncratic film director Nicolas Roeg, whose odd but compelling films included Performance and The Man Who Fell To Earth, has died. He passed away on Friday night of undisclosed causes at age 90, according to his son.

Roeg’s work, which was often opaque and non-traditional, influenced a generation of filmmakers, but wasn’t widely accepted at first. Performance was almost not released, and later re-cut by Warner Bros., whose executives found it almost incomprehensible. It is now considered a classic, decades later.

Before directing, Roeg had built a solid reputation as a cinematographer, winning acclaim for his work on Far From The Madding Crowd and Fahrenheit 451, among others.

But it was his work on Performance that caused a stir. Co-directed with Donald Cammell, its non-linear narrative and dark tones recalled such auteurs as Jean-Luc Godard and Richard Lester. It became a signature piece, leading to such stylized and arty
See full article at Deadline »

Nicolas Roeg, Director of ‘The Man Who Fell to Earth,’ ‘The Witches,’ Dies at 90

  • Variety
Nicolas Roeg, Director of ‘The Man Who Fell to Earth,’ ‘The Witches,’ Dies at 90
Director and noted cinematographer Nicolas Roeg, whose offbeat films included “Performance,” “Don’t Look Now,” “The Witches” and “The Man Who Fell to Earth,” has died. He was 90.

His son Nicolas Roeg Jr. told the BBC his father died Friday night.

A daring and influential craftsman, Roeg’s idiosyncratic films influenced filmmakers including Danny Boyle and Steven Soderbergh.

He worked his way up from the bottom of the business and by the 1960s was much in demand as a cinematographer, responsible for the lensing of films including “Petulia,” “Far From the Madding Crowd” and “Fahrenheit 451.”

The controversial, oddly compelling Mick Jagger-starring “Performance,” which Roeg co-directed with Donald Cammell, was almost not released and then was recut by Warner Bros.; execs at the studio found it incomprehensible as a gangster thriller. It was eventually recut, released in 1970 to modest business and decades later received widespread acclaim as a classic of British cinema.
See full article at Variety »
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