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Portugal’s Film Industry Gets a Funding Boost

  • Variety
Portugal’s Film Industry Gets a Funding Boost
Despite producing only around 15 feature films per year, Portuguese cinema has consistently won significant festival prizes.

In 2018, awards for Portuguese films included Cannes’ Critics’ Week winner, “Diamantino” by Gabriel Abrantes and Daniel Schmidt, and “The Dead and the Others” by João Salaviza and Renée Nader Messora, which took a Special Jury Prize at Cannes’ Un Certain Regard.

Portuguese filmmakers have survived through a mixture of dedication, creative ingenuity and co-productions. Amid economic crisis, in 2012, the situation seemed dire, with Portugal’s National Film and Audiovisual Institute (Ica) unable to open any funding lines.

However a 2012 film law, revised in 2014, provided new revenues for the Ica by introducing levies on subscription TV services. As a result, the Ica has been able to channel significant additional funding into the domestic industry, including new support programs for TV series and animation features.

Investment obligations for domestic broadcasters have also been upped including reinforced commitments for public broadcaster,
See full article at Variety »

‘Pope Francis: A Man of His Word’: Wim Wenders Grilled the Pontiff and Left Amazed

‘Pope Francis: A Man of His Word’: Wim Wenders Grilled the Pontiff and Left Amazed
Wim Wenders is a sophisticated man of cinema, a nine-time Cannes Palme d’Or contender who led the 1989 jury that gave Steven Soderbergh the Palme d’Or over Spike Lee. (He says he was not the architect of that collective decision.) The graduate of the ’70s German New Wave who has close ties to America has shown deep spirituality in such films as Cannes Best Director-winner “Wings of Desire,” “Faraway, So Close,” and “The Salt of the Earth.”

Still, choosing Wenders to direct a documentary about the Holy Father did not look obvious at first. It turns out that Wenders was raised in a Catholic family where “faith was important,” he told me at Cannes. He admired his father, a doctor who “lived life and his profession as a believer, he loved people and was always there for anybody who was sick.”

More recently, Wenders was struck by the joyful way his father embraced death,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Pope Francis: A Man of His Word’: Wim Wenders Grilled the Pontiff and Left Amazed

‘Pope Francis: A Man of His Word’: Wim Wenders Grilled the Pontiff and Left Amazed
Wim Wenders is a sophisticated man of cinema, a nine-time Cannes Palme d’Or contender who led the 1989 jury that gave Steven Soderbergh the Palme d’Or over Spike Lee. (He says he was not the architect of that collective decision.) The graduate of the ’70s German New Wave who has close ties to America has shown deep spirituality in such films as Cannes Best Director-winner “Wings of Desire,” “Faraway, So Close,” and “The Salt of the Earth.”

Still, choosing Wenders to direct a documentary about the Holy Father did not look obvious at first. It turns out that Wenders was raised in a Catholic family where “faith was important,” he told me at Cannes. He admired his father, a doctor who “lived life and his profession as a believer, he loved people and was always there for anybody who was sick.”

More recently, Wenders was struck by the joyful way his father embraced death,
See full article at Indiewire »

The storyteller's tale by Anne-Katrin Titze

Colin MacCabe on shooting Berger: "John absolutely refused to plan things." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Author, artist, self-declared storyteller John Berger is the focus of the intricately woven strands that make up The Seasons In Quincy: Four Portraits Of John Berger. Produced by The Derek Jarman Lab as a quartet of individual film essays, directed by Tilda Swinton, Christopher Roth, Bartek Dziadosz and Colin MacCabe, the combination allows for fascinating interplay of concerns.

On the opening day in New York, Colin MacCabe and I had a conversation that led from Berger's kitchen to Ken Loach's I, Daniel Blake, The Spectre Of Hope on Sebastião Salgado, Chris Marker, Neil Jordan collaborator Patrick McCabe, Isaac Julien, Roland Barthes, Jacques Derrida, Martin Heidegger, the editing by Christopher Roth and the cinematography of Bartek Dziadosz, apples, raspberries and cows, Brexit and Northern Ireland.

Tilda Swinton: "As soon as we finished the first one,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Berlinale 2016: 'Mapplethorpe: Look at the Pictures' is Wildly Inspiring

As an avid photographer myself, I truly love coming across a documentary that expands my mind about the artistic qualities and emotional power of excellent photography. Along with The Salt of the Earth (about legendary photographer Sebastião Salgado), the documentary Mapplethorpe: Look at the Pictures is the latest to leave me floored. This utterly inspiring and eye-opening doc examines the (entire) life of Robert Mapplethorpe, a controversial gay photographer whose work was banned from museums in the 90s because it was deemed too obscene. Boy were they wrong. Hearing him talk about his life and then seeing the photos he produced - I couldn't help repeating in my mind, "this guy is a true master of photography." Seriously. Robert Mapplethorpe never studied photography and had a fairly standard childhood. He eventually started exploring his sexuality while growing up and moved to New York City (spending time at the Hotel Chelsea), inspired primarily by Andy Warhol,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

The Salt Of The Earth to screen at New York IFC Center by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2015-09-16 13:54:45

Anne-Katrin Titze presents The Salt Of The Earth - IFC Center Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

On September 18, at 3:05pm, as part of the Wim Wenders: Portraits Along The Road in New York, film journalist Anne-Katrin Titze will present Wenders' and Juliano Ribeiro Salgado's The Salt Of The Earth on the life and work of master photographer Sebastião Salgado.

Sebastião Salgado could be John Ford looking out over the plains

In an upcoming conversation on Until The End Of The World, Wim and I discuss Sam Shepard's influence before he worked with Volker Schlöndorff on Max Frisch's Homo Faber. We also talk about Yasujiro Ozu actors Chishû Ryû and Kuniko Miyake, Alfred Hitchcock and San Francisco, Chen Kaige and China, Robby Müller and Vermeer, and look forward to Michael Almereyda's Experimenter.

Starring Solveig Dommartin, Max von Sydow, William Hurt, Jeanne Moreau, Rüdiger Vogler and Sam Neill,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

On the road, up on the roof by Anne-Katrin Titze

Wim Wenders with Anne-Katrin Titze Photo: Claire Brunel

The director of recent documentaries Pina on the late great choreographer poet Pina Bausch and the Oscar nominated The Salt Of The Earth with Juliano Ribeiro Salgado on master photographer Sebastião Salgado, is in New York for Wim Wenders: Portraits Along The Road, the first stop for a major retrospective of his films. Wenders has many long-term collaborations along the way including Peter Handke and Nick Cave who will appear with Reda Kateb (great in David Oelhoffen's Albert Camus adaptation, Far From Men, opposite Viggo Mortensen) and Sophie Semin in his latest film, The Beautiful Days Of Aranjuez (Les Beaux Jours D’Aranjuez).

We also talked about how in Nanni Moretti's Mia Madre the poster of Wings Of Desire made it into a dream sequence and Wim's Film4Climate involvement.

In the elevator on my way to meet Wim,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Honesty (No Lie!) About The Movies Of 2015… So Far!

So here we are, smack dab in the middle of the dog days of summer (and if you don’t get that little saying, try lying out on the sidewalk in 100-degree heat for 15 minutes or so, like Fido does, and see if a light bulb doesn’t go off). The dogs are often howling in movie theaters too—at times it seems as though August has replaced January in the hearts of moviegoers as the dumping ground for pictures not really worthy of our attention (or a serious investment in the marketing department). Movies like Pixels and Fantastic Four have their perverse fascination—just how bad can they possibly be? Both were greeted with reviews so scathing and unyielding in their acidity that studio heads can only pray nothing in October, November or December will be perceived as worse, and I have to admit a certain curiosity. But that
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Clash of the titans through a lens by Richard Mowe

Image conscious (from left): Juliano Ribeiro Salgado, Sebastião Salgado and Wim Wenders, collaborators on The Salt of the Earth. The atmosphere was not always so amicable ... Photo: Thierry Pouffary

The epic still photographs of Brazilian artist and environmentalist Sebastião Salgado take pride of place in a spectacular new documentary about his life and work. Directed by Wim Wenders (Buena Vista Social Club, Pina) in association with Salgado’s son, Juliano Ribeiro Salgado, The Salt Of The Earth was awarded Un Certain Regard Special Jury Award at the Cannes Film Festival and was Oscar nominated. The relationship between Salgado fils and Wenders was strained to breaking point at times...

Richard Mowe: Have you been bowled over by the way the film has been received so enthusiastically?

Juliano Ribeiro Salgado: Its success is a huge surprise – from that first moment in Cannes when we had such an amazing reception, to
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

The Salt of the Earth review – Wim Wenders’s thoughtful portrait of photographer Sebastião Salgado

Wim Wenders’s collaboration with Sebastião Salgado’s son speaks volumes about the photographer, his motivations and subject matter

Wim Wenders co-directed this documentary about Sebastião Salgado with the photographer’s son, Juliano Ribeiro Salgado, bringing “an outsider’s view” to a wealth of extant footage and photos. From stunning images of the gold mines of Serra Pelada (“I had travelled to the dawn of time”), to the horrors of famine in the Sahel and genocide in Rwanda (“We humans are a terrible animal… our history is a history of war”), and ultimately to the rebirth of the “Genesis” project, The Salt of the Earth finds Salgado revisiting and confronting his turbulent past.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Salt of the Earth documentary review: photographing the human condition

“Everyone should see these images to see how terrible our species is.” Yet there is hope in this portrait of social photographer Sebastião Salgado, too. I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

I think the first time I became aware of the work of Sebastião Salgado — although I didn’t learn his name until I saw this film — was when his stark black-and-white photographs of the hellish landscape of the burning oil fields in Kuwait in 1991 were all over magazines at the time. You may also have seen his harrowing yet powerfully humanistic images of people impacted by war, famine, displacement, and other 20th-century nightmares: he has documented such now infamous places-and-times as early-80s Ethiopia and Bosnia and Congo in the 1990s. Of his work in Bosnia, Salgado says here, sadly: “Everyone should see these
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Why Salt of the Earth is the film you should watch this week – video review

A documentary, directed by Wim Wenders and Juliano Ribeiro Salgado, about capturing humanity, The Salt of the Earth follows the career of photographer and ethnologist Sebastião Salgado, whose photos depict the vanishing lifestyles of the world's indigenous people. The Salt of the Earth, which was nominated for an Oscar this year, is released in the UK on Friday 17 July Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Salt of the Earth review – colourful portrait of visionary photographer Sebastião Salgado

This deeply considered documentary from Wim Wenders and the photographer’s son looks at the Brazilian artist behind monochrome images that transcend history itself

The amazing monochrome images created by 71-year-old Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado are the subject of this deeply considered documentary study, co-directed by Wim Wenders and the photographer’s son, Juliano Ribeiro Salgado. The cinema screen is a good platform for work so passionately idealistic and, perhaps, grandiose. The pictures are the result of Salgado’s remarkable 40-year career as a photojournalist – although that word does not do justice to a vocation closer to artist, ethnographer and self-described “witness to the human condition”.

Related: The Salt of the Earth: the Wim Wenders and Juliano Salgado double bill

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Wim Wenders' Academy Award-Nominated Doc 'The Salt of the Earth' is Now on Blu-Ray/DVD

Endlessly trekking the globe to capture breathtaking images of the natural and human realms, Sebastião Salgado is regarded as one of the most talented photographers alive. His work documents moments in time that sometimes are reminiscent of surreal realities and others harsh reminders of the evils of mankind.

Four over 40 years the Brazilian artist has visited isolated communities in remote corners of earth and witnessed striking events that have shaped his perception of our flawed world. Having to flee his homeland in the 60s as the military dictatorship became more oppressive, Salgado and his wife relocated to France where he bought his first camera with no real intentions beyond a hobby. But after taking his first photograph, of her of course, he was hooked and eventually dismissed his stable career as an economist to pursue this burning new passion.

Now, the explorer has been observed in the Academy Award-nominated "The Salt of the Earth," an elegantly achieved documentary by veteran filmmaker Wim Wenders and Salgado's own son, Juliano Ribeiro Salgado. Revisiting his most acclaimed work and following him into new photographic adventures, the film serves not only as a portrait of the creator but it also illuminates the reasoning for his devoted pursuit. There is a subtly political component to his work that demands social justice by exposing inequality and the dangers of voracious capitalism with haunting beauty This journey into the sensitivities and concerns of such exceptional visionary is a documentary that only Wenders could envision and that could only be as insightful as it is due to Juliano’s involvement as co-director.

The Salt of the Earth” is confrontational, spiritual, revelatory, compassionate, and deeply humanistic. It’s the story of one man who relates to pain and joy through his camera and how that connects with those who get to see it thanks to him.

After a successful theatrical run grossing over $1.3 million dollars, Sony Pictures Classics has released “The Salt of the Earth” on Blu-ray and DVD. This release includes great extra content such as numerous deleted scenes that add to the incredible visual experience the film already is and an intimate conversation between the two directors about the making of it. Unmissable.

Special Features

-Deleted Scenes: Over 35 minutes of beautifully-shot deleted scenes.

-Commentary with Wim Wenders and Juliano Ribeiro Salgado.

-Looking Back: Wim and Juliano reflect on the making of their film.
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Film Review: 'Salt of the Earth'

  • CineVue
★★★★☆ "Everyone should see these images to see how terrible out species is," says Brazilian photography Sebastião Salgado as he reviews the photographs that he has taken throughout his career. It has been a career that has been inspired by an intense social conscience, a fierce and bold curiosity, and an eye for beauty and the arresting image that can actually change the conditions he seeks to record. German film maker Wim Wenders came to The Salt of the Earth (2014) as a fan of Salgrado having purchased a print of his some years ago. Salgado’s son Juliano, who is Wenders' co-director, had already begun filming his father, and the seventy-year-old photographer proves as fascinating as his art.
See full article at CineVue »

The Conversation: 2015’s Top 10 Theatrical Releases So Far…

With the first half of 2015 officially coming to a close, it’s time for our mid-year list of best theatrical releases. As seems to be the trend, a bulk of these titles were selections premiering in the late fall circuit of 2014, a move sometimes granting offbeat art-house selections a bit more breathing room (though not always). Here’s a glance at what represents the best of the year thus far, including two directorial debuts, one posthumous work, and one studio feature:

10. The Salt of the Earth – Dir. Wim Wenders & Juliano Ribeiro Salgado

Premiering at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival, German auteur Wim Wenders explores the prolific career of Brazilian photographer Sebastiao Salgado, here with the help of his son, Juliano Ribeiro Salgado serving as co-director. Known for capturing catastrophic events in striking fashion, the documentary finds the artist in search of something positive after decades documenting human nature at its worst.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Wim Wenders: misfit, outsider and the man who helped America to see itself

After half a century of making films, the director is back on form with The Salt of the Earth and shows no signs slowing down

Wim Wenders is responsible for some of the most profound films made about America – quite a feat considering he doesn’t have a drop of starred-and-striped blood in his body. Paris, Texas is the obvious example: a western in mood and iconography, no matter that it is set in 1980s Los Angeles. It won the Palme d’Or at Cannes in 1984 and remains the director’s masterpiece. In that film, and many others, he showed the world what America looked like, and helped America to see itself through foreign eyes. Even those pictures not set in the Us – such as the great 1970s road movies Alice in the Cities and Kings of the Road, which made Wenders an arthouse darling – explore the influence, the voodoo romanticism,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Salt Of The Earth – The Review

Last year’s bumper crop of engrossing art documentary feature films included one set in the world of photography called Finding Vivian Maier which went on to earn an Oscar nomination. It showcased the Chicago-area pictures taken by a nanny/ caregiver in the 1950’s to the 70’s which were discovered recently by a modern-day photog. In a way, the film was a mystery movie, investigating the largely unknown life of this hidden artist, In the new film The Salt Of The Earth (also an Oscar nominee), there’s no such mystery, as its main subject has been known and celebrated for the past 40 years: Brazilian photojournalist Sebastião Salgado. Plus, he never limited himself to his native land as he spans the globe in search of the drama of life.

As the film begins, we’re bombarded by remarkable black and white images of a gold mining dig down in South America.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Few sparks from romantic melodrama

The once-winning Nicholas Sparks formula of a young couple.s quest for love being derailed by illness, death or other misfortune seems to be losing its allure at cinemas.

The Longest Ride, a romantic melodrama based on Sparks. 2013 novel, rang up $1.45 million on 220 screens, including previews, last weekend.

That.s better than the anaemic $758,000 debut last year of The Best of Me, which ended up with $2.2 million,. but it's debatable whether the film will have the legs to match previous Sparks adaptations such as The Notebook (which made $6.4 million back in 2004) and Nights in Rodanthe. ($4.55 million in 2008).

The Longest Ride follows the star-crossed love affair between Luke (Scott Eastwood, son of Clint), a former champion rodeo rider looking to make a comeback, and Sophie (Britt Robertson), a college student who's about to embark on her dream job in New York City's art world.

Alan Alda is along for the ride as Ira,
See full article at IF.com.au »

The Salt Of The Earth Review

There’s a perceptible reverence for Sebastião Salgado and his work as a social issues photographer in the Oscar-nominated documentary The Salt of the Earth, out this Friday in New York and Los Angeles. Considering the filmmakers’ relationship with their subject, it isn’t hard to figure out why. Three time Oscar nominee and The Salt of the Earth co-director, Wim Wenders (Buena Vista Social Club, Pina) bought one of Sebastião’s photos when he first discovered him, and immediately became enchanted with both the photography and the man. Wenders’ co-director is Juliano Salgado, Sebastião’s son who first began filming his father when Sebastião asked Juliano to accompany him on a trip to photograph the reclusive Amazonian Zo’é tribe.

Wenders and the younger Salgado spent several years assembling a documentary that combines intimate behind-the-scenes moments alongside Sebastião as he makes progress on his “Genesis” collection with reflective examinations
See full article at We Got This Covered »
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