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‘Law & Order: SVU’ Renewed For Record-Breaking 21st Season By NBC As Dick Wolf & Mariska Hargitay Write TV History

  • Deadline
‘Law & Order: SVU’ Renewed For Record-Breaking 21st Season By NBC As Dick Wolf & Mariska Hargitay Write TV History
Law & Order: SVU and its star Mariska Hargitay have cemented their places in television history. NBC has renewed Dick Wolf’s series for a record-setting 21st season, making it TV’s longest-running primetime live-action series, surpassing the previous mark of 20 seasons set by mothership series Law & Order (1990-2010) and Gunsmoke (1955-75).

The renewal also marks a milestone for Hargitay’s Lt. Benson as the longest-running character in a primetime live-action series. Hargitay surpassed Gunsmoke‘s James Arness and Milburn Stone as well as Kelsey Grammer who have all portrayed the same character for 20 consecutive seasons..

“We tip our cap to Dick Wolf, Mariska Hargitay and the amazing cast and crew of SVU, who now all go into the record book,” said Paul Telegdy and George Cheeks,
See full article at Deadline »

Phantom Lady

Robert Siodmak’s first film noir is a visually expressive masterpiece in the lush romantic tradition that imposes a dreamlike mood on a nightmarish story. Ella Raines goes to extreme lengths to break the conspiracy that’s sending her boss to Death Row, aided by the Kafka-like indifference of modern Manhattanites. Franchot Tone is the man with the weird hands, but Woody Bredell’s chiaroscuro cinematography is what puts this proto-feminist tale in the top tier.

Phantom Lady

Blu-ray

Arrow Academy

1944 / B&W / 1:37 Academy / 87 min. / Street Date March 5, 2019 / Available from Arrow Video / 39.95

Starring: Franchot Tone, Ella Raines, Alan Curtis, Aurora Miranda, Thomas Gomez, Fay Helm, Elisha Cook Jr., Andrew Tombes, Regis Toomey, Joseph Crehan, Doris Lloyd, Virginia Brissac, Milburn Stone.

Cinematography: Woody Bredell

Film Editor: Arthur Hilton

Written by Bernard C. Schoenfeld, based on the novel by William Irish (Cornell Woolrich)

Produced by Joan Harrison

Directed by Robert Siodmak

1944’s
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Law & Order: Svu’ Guns For ‘Gunsmoke’s Record With Season 20 Renewal As Dick Wolf & Mariska Hargitay Write TV History

  • Deadline
‘Law & Order: Svu’ Guns For ‘Gunsmoke’s Record With Season 20 Renewal As Dick Wolf & Mariska Hargitay Write TV History
Law & Order: Svu star and executive producer Mariska Hargitay summed it up best on Twitter on Wednesday night. “Season 20. #History,” she wrote after NBC’s announcement that the long-running crime drama has been renewed for a 20th season. That ties the record for longest-running drama series currently shared by Law & Order and Gunsmoke.

Just an hour or so earlier, Hargitay had broken the pickup news to the cast and crew during Law & Order: Svu’s Season 19 wrap party.

Season 20. It’s happening. #TheMarathonContinues #History

— Mariska Hargitay (@Mariska) May 10, 2018

In May 2010, Wolf was denied a shot at breaking Gunsmoke‘s record when, in a surprising move, NBC’s previous regime canceled the mothership Law & Order series after 20 seasons. Setting a new all-time longevity mark had meant a lot to the uber-producer, who was very upset by the abrupt cancellation. He now has a second shot at history and likely won’t be denied again.
See full article at Deadline »

Young Mr. Lincoln

Viewers looking (desperately) for American leaders to admire can’t do better than to reflect on John Ford’s folksy, at least partly authentic honorarium to one of the greats. Henry Fonda is 100% dead-on as a vision of Abe Lincoln to bring tears to our eyes. Imagine . . . there’s such a thing as political integrity, or simply a person that puts the public good ahead of personal advantage. Criterion’s older extras are augmented with a fine new feature commentary by John Ford authority Joseph McBride.

Young Mr. Lincoln

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 320

1939 / B&W / 1:37 Academy / 100 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date January 9, 2018 / 39.95

Starring: Henry Fonda, Alice Brady, Marjorie Weaver, Arleen Whelan, Eddie Collins, Richard Cromwell, Eddie Quillan, Ward Bond, Milburn Stone, Francis Ford, Fred Kohler Jr..

Cinematography: Bert Glennon

Original Music: Alfred Newman

Written by Lamar Trotti

Produced by Kenneth Macgowan, Darryl F. Zanuck

Directed by John
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Fiery Red-Head Hayward Is TCM's Star of the Month

Susan Hayward. Susan Hayward movies: TCM Star of the Month Fiery redhead Susan Hayward it Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Month in Sept. 2015. The five-time Best Actress Oscar nominee – like Ida Lupino, a would-be Bette Davis that only sporadically landed roles to match the verve of her thespian prowess – was initially a minor Warner Bros. contract player who went on to become a Paramount second lead in the early '40s, a Universal leading lady in the late '40s, and a 20th Century Fox star in the early '50s. TCM will be presenting only three Susan Hayward premieres, all from her Fox era. Unfortunately, her Paramount and Universal work – e.g., Among the Living, Sis Hopkins, And Now Tomorrow, The Saxon Charm – which remains mostly unavailable (in quality prints), will remain unavailable this month. Highlights of the evening include: Adam Had Four Sons (1941), a sentimental but surprisingly
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Oscar-Nominated Film Series: First 'Pirates of the Caribbean' One of Most Enjoyable Summer Blockbusters of Early 21st Century

'Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl': Johnny Depp as Capt. Jack Sparrow. 'Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl' review: Mostly an enjoyable romp (Oscar Movie Series) Pirate movies were a Hollywood staple for about three decades, from the mid-'20s (The Sea Hawk, The Black Pirate) to the mid-to-late '50s (Moonfleet, The Buccaneer), when the genre, by then mostly relegated to B films, began to die down. Sporadic resurrections in the '80s and '90s turned out to be critical and commercial bombs (Pirates, Cutthroat Island), something that didn't bode well for the Walt Disney Company's $140 million-budgeted film "adaptation" of one of their theme-park rides. But Neptune's mood has apparently improved with the arrival of the new century. He smiled – grinned would be a more appropriate word – on the Gore Verbinski-directed Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

“For Mature Audiences Only”: treasured TV oldsters of yesteryear

Some may say that television hasn’t been too good to senior citizens in terms of their stereotypical depictions. Regardless of the unflattering portrayals there had been some memorable oldsters (in this case over 60) that have given us equal shares of both laughs and cries. In “For Mature Audiences Only”, let’s take a look at some of the more mature characterizations that had an impact on our daily doses of entertainment on the glorious boob tube.

Instead of doing a typical top ten or top twenty listing let’s go in between with a top fifteen selection, shall we? The “For Mature Audiences Only” choices are not necessarily a tasting that everyone will agree on. Perhaps you have your own preferences that were omitted or something that you feel should be added? Anyway, here are the candidates in alphabetical order…

Now for our pop cultural Pepto Bismol personalities:

1.) Doc Galen Adams,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Forget Hitchcock's Vertigo: Tonight the Greatest Movie About Obsessive Desire

Joan Fontaine movies: ‘This Above All,’ ‘Letter from an Unknown Woman’ (photo: Cary Grant, Joan Fontaine in ‘Suspicion’ publicity image) (See previous post: “Joan Fontaine Today.”) Also tonight on Turner Classic Movies, Joan Fontaine can be seen in today’s lone TCM premiere, the flag-waving 20th Century Fox release The Above All (1942), with Fontaine as an aristocratic (but socially conscious) English Rose named Prudence Cathaway (Fontaine was born to British parents in Japan) and Fox’s top male star, Tyrone Power, as her Awol romantic interest. This Above All was directed by Anatole Litvak, who would guide Olivia de Havilland in the major box-office hit The Snake Pit (1948), which earned her a Best Actress Oscar nod. In Max Ophüls’ darkly romantic Letter from an Unknown Woman (1948), Fontaine delivers not only what is probably the greatest performance of her career, but also one of the greatest movie performances ever. Letter from an Unknown Woman
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

CBS Gives You A Chance To Stop And Smell The "Gunsmoke"

CBS is slowly rolling out on DVD television's longest running show, Gunsmoke. Season 7 (Volume 1) of this 20-year series continues the saga of Dodge City, Kansas, where American western tropes are hashed out—and rehashed—each week. There are cowboys, prostitutes, and outlaws galore in this surprisingly heartwarming series.

Just like Perry Mason, Gunsmoke, too, has an episodic formula. Each episode features a small group of new characters who in some way get involved with Dodge City and the main characters of the show. Usually they cause trouble that requires the attention of Marshal Matt Dillon (James Arness) and almost always results in the death of one of the guest stars. Other main characters include saloon-owner Miss Kitty (Amanda Blake), Doc Adams (Milburn Stone), and Dillon's deputy sidekick Chester (Dennis Weaver). While there are no real recurring stories, there are solid relationships between the main characters that keep viewers engaged—especially
See full article at JustPressPlay »

James Arness, Amanda Blake, and John Wayne Hollywood heroes in Westerns?

Here's the latest celeb gossip excerpt from a post originally featured on Green Celebrity Network (http://greencelebrity.net), a green gossip website that shares unique lifestyle reviews about Hollywood star celebs featured in movies, on television, and whose names recently made front page headlines in entertainment news. The website says...

Go West! James Arness, Amanda Blake, and John Wayne Hollywood American heroes as star celebs in Westerns? [Jun. 5] Gunsmoke was a popular television series based on life in the Wild, Wild West that aired from 1955 to 1975. Recently deceased actor James Arness played the lead role Marshal Matt Dillon, while his love interest Miss Kitty was played by the lovely red headed actress Amanda Blake. The Marshal's assistant was named Chester, a character played by actor Dennis Weaver. He won an Emmy for playing that role; however, when he left the show, the beloved and quirky character of Festus Haggen took over as a TV show favorite,
See full article at Green Celebrity »

James Arness, Gunsmoke's Matt Dillion, Dies at 88

James Arness, who stood for law and order as TV sheriff Matt Dillion in “Gunsmoke,” TV’s longest running drama, died today (June 3) at 88 at his home in Brentwood, Calif. At the very end, he thanked his fans and assured them he led a “blessed life.” James Arness the man was every bit as solid and soft spoken as the television character he played. And he was right for the times. His TV family was made up of Amanda Blake, who played saloon keeper Miss Kitty; Milburn Stone who played Doc Adams and Dennis Weaver who played deputy Chester Goode.
See full article at TheImproper.com »

'Gunsmoke' Star James Arness Dies at 88

  • Aol TV.
'Gunsmoke' Star James Arness Dies at 88
Filed under: Reality-Free, TV News

Legendary 'Gunsmoke' star James Arness, a bigger-than-life actor who kept the peace as Marshal Matt Dillon during the show's remarkable 20-year run, died Friday of natural causes at his home in Brentwood, Calif., his family told the Los Angeles Times. He was 88.

'Gunsmoke' debuted on CBS in 1955 and ran until 1975, in the process making Arness one of the more enduring stars on television and the Matt Dillon character one of its most beloved and trusted.

The 6' 7" Arness towered over the cast, including Dillon's deputy, Chester, played by Dennis Weaver. Other supporting stars included Amanda Blake as Kitty and Milburn Stone as Doc Adams.

 

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See full article at Aol TV. »

CBS Films Takes Aim @ "Gunsmoke"

  • SneakPeek
CBS Films is currently casting for the part of 'Marshal Matt Dillon', in the upcoming big screen adaptation of "Gunsmoke", based on the 20-season run of the classic "Gunsmoke" TV series.

Screenplay for "Gunsmoke" is by Gregory Poirier, writer of "National Treasure: Book of Secrets".

The original television series starring actor James "The Thing From Another World" Arness, ran from September 10, 1955 to March 31, 1975 on CBS with 635 total episodes. John Wayne was first offered the lead part, but turned it down, not wanting to work in TV.

Wayne introduced the show before its first episode, following-up on his recommendation of Arness for the part.

Other main characters on the series included Dennis Weaver as 'Chester Goode', Milburn Stone as 'Dr. Galen "Doc" Adams' and Amanda Blake as 'Miss Kitty Russell', owner of the 'Long Branch Saloon'.

Initially on the fringes of Dodge society, 'Festus' was slowly phased in as
See full article at SneakPeek »

Brad Pitt contends for 'Gunsmoke' leading role. Ryan Reynolds also vying.

Brad Pitt is the top dog to snag the role of Marshal Matt Dillon, the lead lawman in the big screen adaptation of 'Gunsmoke' from CBS Films. Dillon is the lawman keeping a Kansas town filled with desperadoes and misfits in order. Also in the mix is the tavern owner Kitty Russell (played by Amanda Blake) and the town physician Dr. Galen 'Doc' Adams (Milburn Stone). Ryan Reynolds is also contending for the lead. Both would be well-fitted to the character. Pitts memorable performance in "The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford" sticks. Reynolds, who excelled in comedy in the past, showed his action talents with roles in "Blade: Trinity," and "X-Men Origins: Wolverine." He's also the title character in "The Green Lantern." According to the Los Angeles Times, several other actors are said to be in the mix for the Dillon part.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Brad Pitt contends for 'Gunsmoke' leading role. Ryan Reynolds also vying.

Brad Pitt is the top dog to snag the role of Marshal Matt Dillon, the lead lawman in the big screen adaptation of 'Gunsmoke' from CBS Films. Dillon is the lawman keeping a Kansas town filled with desperadoes and misfits in order. Also in the mix is the tavern owner Kitty Russell (played by Amanda Blake) and the town physician Dr. Galen 'Doc' Adams (Milburn Stone). Ryan Reynolds is also contending for the lead. Both would be well-fitted to the character. Pitts memorable performance in "The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford" sticks. Reynolds, who excelled in comedy in the past, showed his action talents with roles in "Blade: Trinity," and "X-Men Origins: Wolverine." He's also the title character in "The Green Lantern." According to the Los Angeles Times, several other actors are said to be in the mix for the Dillon part.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Poll: Did Leonard Nimoy win an Emmy for 'Star Trek'?

Monday, we trekked through a worm hole together to revisit the TV series "Star Trek" when it competed at the Emmys in 1967 for best drama series. Now let's beam ourselves into "Star Trek's" other big Emmy battle: best supporting actor. Those are the only two award categories in which it competed during its brief three years on NBC.   It's odd that Leonard Nimoy was the only cast member nominated for acting, a feat he repeated all three years. Mr. Spock not only was the least emotionally flashy role aboard the starship Enterprise, the character prided himself upon expressing no emotion at all! Hey, did Mr. Spock have a secret Vulcan death grip on TV academy voters? If so, did he ever win for "Star Trek"? After voting below, check out the answer here. Answer: In 1969, Leonard Nimoy lost to Werner Klemperer, who portrayed a silly, bungling Nazi commandant on "Hogan's Heroes.
See full article at Gold Derby »

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