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Good Neighbors Review: Never Get Between a Woman and Her Kitty

  • Pajiba
Writer and director, Jacob Tierney -- working from a Chrystine Brouillet short-story -- brings us Good Neighbors, a nifty dark comedy with an emphasis on the dark. The film, set in Montreal, centers on three neighbors in an apartment building: Victor (Jay Baruchel) is the new arrival, an earnest elementary school teacher with some neediness issues; Louise (Emily Hampshire) a quiet waitress with a quirky obsession with her cats; and Spencer (Scott Speedman), a wheelchair-bound asshole with a uncomfortably black sense of humor.

Early on, the three form an awkward friendship; Victor is clearly in love with Emily, Emily is in love with her cats, and Spencer is in love with himself. Meanwhile, there's a serial killer on the loose; the three neighbors all develop a quiet fascination with murderer/rapist. There is reason to believe that one among the three is the possible killer. Tierney expertly raises our suspicions and then confirms them,
See full article at Pajiba »

Good Neighbors (2010)

Directed by: Jacob Tierney

Written by: Jacob Tierney

Cast: Jay Baruchel, Emily Hampshire, Scott Speedman, Xavier Dolan

Neighbors are like family: you're stuck with the hand fate deals.

There's not much you can do to escape them, other than murder those individuals who really piss you off. Jacob Tierney's adaptation of Chrystine Brouillet's 1982 novel, Chère Voisine, explores the lives of three Montreal apartment dwellers with a hankering for homicide that will be familiar to anyone who has ever cursed thin interior walls.

Neurotic, twitching Victor (Jay Baruchel) is new to the building, and finds it no easy task to befriend his neighbors, cat lady Louise (Emily Hampshire), and wheelchair bound jock Spencer (Scott Speedman). Victor lacks the social skills to take 'No' for an answer and bulldozes Spencer into holding a dinner party. A fragile three-way connection builds from there. Confined to their Notre-Dame-de-Grâce building by the harsh Canadian winter,
See full article at Planet Fury »

Good Neighbors: Bringing Humor Back to Noir

Scott Speedman, Emily Hampshire, Jay Baruchel / courtesy Magnolia Pictures With so many action movies and shoot-em-ups and 3D extravaganzas on the cinematic landscape, it's nice to find some respite with a good old-fashioned noir, one focused on characters in one charismatic location. That's what you'll find in Jacob Tierney's latest, Good Neighbors. Based on Quebecoise author Chrystine Brouillet's first novel Chère Voisine, Good Neighbors centers on a character-filled apartment building in the Notre Dame de Grace neighborhood of Montreal, where a serial killer has been terrorizing local women. As the film opens, two of the building's residents - Spencer (Scott Speedman), a young widower in wheelchair, and Louise (Emily Hampshire), a waitress devoted to her cats - meet their new neighbor, Victor (Jay Baruchel), an eager to please schoolteacher. As their at-times-awkward friendship develops, tensions mount, secrets and jealousies rear their ugly heads, and Louise's cats become as
See full article at Tribeca Film »

Good Neighbors Movie Review

  • ShockYa
Good Neighbors Movie Review
Title: Good Neighbors Directed By: Jacob Tierney Written By: Jacob Tierney, from Chere voisine, a novel by Chrystine Brouillet Cast: Jay Baruchel, Scott Speedman, Emily Hampshire Opens: July 29, 2011 Some Americans seem to think that Canadians are a bland bunch-generally English-speaking, health problems taken care of, no major wars in memory, live-and-let-live. Perhaps an exception is made for Quebecois since to us here in the States a French-speaking people would be considered ethnic and thereby more passionate. The ironically named good neighbors in Jacob Tierney’s picture, based on a novel by Chrystine Brouillet, would be among the many exceptions that could prove the rule as the three flawed principals...
See full article at ShockYa »

‘Good Neighbours’: a Montreal-set thriller gone tragically wrong

Good Neighbours

Written by Jacob Tierney

Directed by Jacob Tierney

Canada, 2010

Essentially a misbegotten remake of Shallow Grave without an ounce of that film’s humor or thrills, Good Neighbours is a daring but nevertheless disappointing attempt at a psychological thriller, buoyed by the early promise of a novel setting and quirky characters, but ultimately done in by its tonal miscalculation and distinct lack of wit. It’s always admirable when a filmmaker refuses to coast, and here Tierney pivots from feather-light comedy (The Trotsky) into some very dark territory, but unfortunately very little of Good Neighbours works.

Tierney’s third feature as screenwriter, adapting from Chrystine Brouillet’s novel, opens solidly enough .Neighbours unspools over four months in second-referendum-era Montreal (October to February 1995/96), an ideal setting for an Anglo-Quebec production meant to be rife with tension. Its awkward Anglo protagonist Victor (Jay Baruchel) has just returned from teaching abroad,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

'Good Neighbours' In Canadian Theatres on June 3

Jacob Tierney's Good Neighbours will come out in select theatres in Canada on June 3.

Speaking about the story, the film is adapted from the novel Chère voisine, which was written by Chrystine Brouillet, and takes place in 1995, the year of the second referendum on the separation of Quebec. In the dead of winter, a serial killer is on the loose in the small Montreal neighbourhood of Notre Dame de Grace. The tenants of an old apartment house must figure out who they can trust and who they can't.

The film stars Jay Baruchel, Scott Speedman, Emily Hampshire, Xavier Dolan, Gary Farmer, Kaniehtiio Horn, Anne-Marie Cadieux, Pat Kiely, Nathalie Girard and Sean Lu.

The following is the trailer and it contains a few spoilers.
See full article at The Cultural Post »

First Trailer And Poster For Good Neighbours

The first trailer for upcoming horror/thriller film, Good Neighbours, has gone up over on the iTunes Movie Trailers website, and it looks pretty promising.

The film is written and directed by Jacob Tierney, and is based on the novel, Chère Voisine (which I think roughly translates the same), by Canadian novelist, Chrystine Brouillet.

Tierney, also Canadian, has set all his films to date in Montreal, which is where the story of Good Neighbours unravels, with a strong Canadian cast. A lot of Canadian actors (as well as many other nationalities) often stick to American-made movies once they’ve made a name for themselves, so it’s nice to see that Tierney’s found a group to work with who are happy to come back to their roots too. Heading up Good Neighbours will be Scott Speedman (Underworld), Jay Baruchel (How To Train Your Dragon), and Emily Hampshire (It’s
See full article at HeyUGuys »

First Clips of 'Good Neighbours'

The first three clips of Jacob Tierney's Good Neighbours surfaced online and the release date for the film hasn't been announced yet.

Speaking about the story, the film is adapted from the novel Chère voisine, which was written by Chrystine Brouillet, and takes place in 1995, the year of the second referendum on the separation of Quebec. In the dead of winter, a serial killer is on the loose in the small Montreal neighbourhood of Notre Dame de Grace. The tenants of an old apartment house must figure out who they can trust and who they can't.

The film stars Jay Baruchel, Scott Speedman, Emily Hampshire, Xavier Dolan, Gary Farmer, Kaniehtiio Horn, Anne-Marie Cadieux, Pat Kiely, Nathalie Girard and Sean Lu.
See full article at The Cultural Post »

Whistler Ff 2010: Review of Jacob Tierney's fantastic thriller Good Neighbours

Year: 2010

Director: Jacob Tierney

Writers: Jacob Tierney, Chrystine Brouillet (book)

IMDb: link

Trailer: link

Review by: Marina Antunes

Rating: 8.5 out of 10

I’m convinced that if Jacob Tierney was working in the Us, he’d an indie darling, a filmmaker everyone would be buzzing about as one to watch. Tierney has, rightfully, earned this title in Canada but a much smaller industry means smaller buzz but it’s alright because Tierney is quickly cracking the waters south of the border – I just hope that when he hits the big time, he sticks to the dark comedy that has made his films to date unforgettable.

While The Trotsky was an out and out comedy with some darker overtones, Good Neighbours is the reverse: a dark film and subject matter peppered with laughs. North American filmmakers tend to be less successful with this mix than film makers in Asia but sometimes a
See full article at QuietEarth »

[News] 'Notre Dame de Grace' Gets Renamed

A few months ago, during a conference on film writing in Montreal, Canadian director Jacob Tierney (The Trotsky) stated that he no longer had the right to use Notre Dame de Grace as the title of his next film. As you can see on his next film's new poster, the title was changed to Good Neighbours.

First of all, Tierney didn't expose the reasons why his next film's title had to be changed.

Speaking about the story, the film is adapted from the novel Chère voisine, which was written by Chrystine Brouillet, and takes place in 1995, the year of the second referendum on the separation of Quebec. In the dead of winter, a serial killer is on the loose in the small Montreal neighbourhood of Notre Dame de Grace. The tenants of an old apartment house must figure out who they can trust and who they can't.

Finally, Good Neighbours stars Jay Baruchel,
See full article at The Cultural Post »

Filming Begins For 'Notre Dame de Grace'

Remember that director Jacob Tierney declared on October that we should be expecting an upcoming film of his that takes place in Notre-Dame-de-Grâce, a district in Montreal. Well, Jay Baruchel, one of the film's stars, just confirmed this morning in an interview that production is underway for this dark film.

First of all, the film is adapted from the novel Chère voisine, which was written by Chrystine Brouillet. According to Myriad Pictures, the U.S. distributor, the story goes like this: In the dead of winter, a serial killer is on the loose in the small Montreal neighborhood of Notre Dame de Grace. The tenants of an old apartment house must figure out who they can trust and who they can't, in this thriller directed by Jacob Tierney.

The film stars Jay Baruchel, Scott Speedman, Emily Hampshire, Gary Farmer, Kaniehtiio Horn, Anne-Marie Cadieux, Pat Kiely and Sean Lu.

Moreover, Myriad
See full article at The Cultural Post »

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