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Watch: Official Us Trailer for Swedish Crime Musical 'Sound of Noise'

The first musical cop movie! Or "Bonnie and Clyde on drums", which sounds pretty damn cool. Magnolia Pictures has debuted the official trailer via Apple for Sound of Noise, a film written and directed by Ola Simonsson and Johannes Stjärne Nilsson. This Swedish crime musical features percussion set pieces throughout and it looks like a cinematic spectacle, I'm honestly a bit sad I missed this at Fantastic Fest (in late 2010), where it won Best Picture. But thankfully it'll be in theaters very soon! The cast includes: Bengt Nilsson, Sanna Persson Halapi, Magnus Borjeson and Johannes Bjork. Check out the fun full trailer below. Watch the official Us trailer for Ola Simonsson & Johannes Stjarne Nilsson's Sound of Noise: You can also download the Sound of Noise official trailer in High Definition over on Apple Follows police officer Amadeus Warnebring, tone-deaf scion of a musical family, as he attempts to track
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

This Week In Trailers: Sound of Noise, Paths of Hate, In Our Name, A Jazzman’s Jazzman: The Gerry Carruthers Story

  • Slash Film
Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: I celebrate all levels of trailers and hopefully this column will satisfactorily give you a baseline of what beta wave I’m operating on, because what better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? Some of the best authors will tell you that writing a short story is a lot harder than writing a long one, that you have to weigh every sentence. What better medium to see how this theory plays itself out beyond that than with movie trailers? Sound of Noise Trailer You know that commercial with the dog who smells bacon and sees bacon but looks at a package with the bacon like strips and yells out,
See full article at Slash Film »

"Sound of Noise," Reviewed

  • IFC
Reviewed at Fantastic Fest 2010.

For a fresh take on the heist movie, just add music. The inventive Swedish comedy "Sound of Noise" (directed by Ola Simonsson and Johannes Stjärne Nilsson) is about a band of musical malcontents who break into a hospital, a bank ("This is a gig! We're only here for the music!" they yell) and other public places to play compositions using the surroundings as their instruments. Led by Sanna (Sanna Persson), the sextet attempt to perform a piece called "Music for One City and Six Drummers" that composer Magnus (Magnus Börjeson) describes, in a mild understatement, as "conceptual."

But in a town where the major musical excitement surrounds a Haydn concert and speakers on the street pipe in saccharine muzak, a little sonic terrorism doesn't seem entirely out of the question. It's "Sound of Noise"'s central lark that instead of this rebellion arriving via the usual path of rock and roll,
See full article at IFC »

'Sound of Noise' Review (Fantastic Fest 2010)

  • Moviefone
Filed under: Reviews, Cinematical, Festivals

"Musical terrorism." When I heard this phrase in conjunction with 'Sound of Noise,' a Swedish film that screened at Fantastic Fest on Saturday, I immediately thought of 'The Blues Brothers.' Those gentlemen wreaked a lot of havoc ... but of course it was for a charitable cause. In 'Sound of Noise,' musicians wreak major havoc all over the city, on purpose, simply because they love music and want people to hear the music in everyday life, as opposed to Muzak and even traditional classical music. The film's successful balance of comedy, music, and police procedural make it easy to understand why it won two Critics Week awards at Cannes this year.

Amadeus Warnebring (Bengt Nilsson) is a police inspector and also the only completely tone-deaf member of an extended musical family, including a younger brother who is a famous conductor. Warnebring knows enough
See full article at Moviefone »

'Sound of Noise' Review (Fantastic Fest 2010)

Filed under: Reviews, Cinematical, Festivals

"Musical terrorism." When I heard this phrase in conjunction with 'Sound of Noise,' a Swedish film that screened at Fantastic Fest on Saturday, I immediately thought of 'The Blues Brothers.' Those gentlemen wreaked a lot of havoc ... but of course it was for a charitable cause. In 'Sound of Noise,' musicians wreak major havoc all over the city, on purpose, simply because they love music and want people to hear the music in everyday life, as opposed to Muzak and even traditional classical music. The film's successful balance of comedy, music, and police procedural make it easy to understand why it won two Critics Week awards at Cannes this year.

Amadeus Warnebring (Bengt Nilsson) is a police inspector and also the only completely tone-deaf member of an extended musical family, including a younger brother who is a famous conductor. Warnebring knows enough
See full article at Cinematical »

Fantastic Fest 2010: Sound Of Noise Review

How can something so simple be so joyful? Maybe that's the key. Like Jackie Chan, the six drummers in Sound Of Noise believe in using everyday objects to make mayhem. As one of them says in a recruiting pitch, "it's dangerous, it's illegal, and it will change the world."

If that quote's not quite accurate, it still captures the spirit of the Swedish-language film, directed by Ola Simonsson and Johannes Stjarne Nilsson. They made a short film nine years ago, Music For One Apartment And Six Drummers, in which six people enter a stranger's apartment and make music out of whatever they find in each room. (Sample: toothbrushes, cleansing agents, towels, toilet seats, light switches, and so forth.) The short is played before the film, which, as good as it was, immediately raised the question of how a feature-length version would play.

Sound Of Noise expands the idea exponentially. Magnus
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

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