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Carlos Reygadas’ 10 Favorite Films

With Carlos Reygadas‘ admirably bold, intimate new drama Our Time now in theaters and his first three films now streaming on The Criterion Channel (along with a recent extensive conversation), it’s thankfully easier than ever to catch up on the poetic works of the Mexican director. To celebrate, today we’re taking a look at his favorite films of all-time.

As voted on in the latest Sight & Sound poll, the influences of the ten selections can be seen throughout this work, most notably in the spiritual ruminations of Andrei Tarkovsky and Ingmar Bergman, the non-professional acting collaborations of Robert Bresson, as well as the striking patience of Béla Tarr. Speaking to one selection, Aleksandr Sokurov’s Mother and Son, Reygadas has said it would be the one film he’d show an alien if they came to our planet. Surprisingly, however, for those who have seen Silent Light, there is no Ordet.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Shanghai: How Nuri Bilge Ceylan Sees the World so Differently

  • Variety
Shanghai: How Nuri Bilge Ceylan Sees the World so Differently
At a masterclass on Thursday, Turkish film director Nuri Bilge Ceylan gave the initial impression of being an austere and unwilling participant. Wearing heavy glasses, keeping his coat on, and responding to questions rather than offering a class, his manner suggested that he was difficult.

In China as the head of the Shanghai International Film Festival’s competition jury, Ceylan also came across as brilliant, learned, insightful, and interestingly self-critical. “I may not be an ideal father (to my two sons),” he said, having recently made a film “The Wild Pear Tree,” in which father-son relationship is central. He also confessed to twice being caught shoplifting cassettes at a time when he lived in London.

But if Ceylan is dogmatic and kleptomaniac, they demonstrate forms of determination that serve his particular, contradictory and dogmatic, film-making process. A process that earned him the Palme d’Or at Cannes in 2014 for “Winter Sleep.
See full article at Variety »

‘The Spy Behind Home Plate’ Film Review: Documentary Recounts Moe Berg’s Improbably True Life Story

  • The Wrap
‘The Spy Behind Home Plate’ Film Review: Documentary Recounts Moe Berg’s Improbably True Life Story
There aren’t a lot of sports stars who could claim to be as interesting as Moe Berg, a Major League baseball player who spoke nearly a dozen languages, blew audiences away on quiz shows, and worked as a spy for the United States government during World War II. Berg nearly assassinated German theoretical physicist Werner Heisenberg. Take that, Dwayne Johnson.

Berg, who got his own biopic last year is now the subject of a major documentary. “The Spy Behind Home Plate.” Written and directed by Aviva Kempner (“The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg”), the film assembles pundits, contemporaries and family members, combining new and archived interview footage to reveal the many incredible facets of Berg’s life.

Nimble and efficient, “The Spy Behind Home Plate” races through that life at a steady clip, unloading one fascinating biographical tidbit after another. The action may be staid — it’s a talking-heads documentary,
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Our Time’ Film Review: Mexican Visionary Carlos Reygadas Explores the Limits of Fidelity

  • The Wrap
‘Our Time’ Film Review: Mexican Visionary Carlos Reygadas Explores the Limits of Fidelity
Transcending the metaphysical impenetrability of “Post Tenebras Lux” and evading the unrestrained grotesqueness of “Battle in Heaven,” illustrious Mexican auteur Carlos Reygadas has spawned his most narratively accessible and emotionally open work to date, “Our Time” (“Nuestro tiempo”), an unhurriedly paced three-hour study of marital anguish caused by idealist parameters of love.

Told with his signature epic visuals — wide shots of majestic landscapes captured under stunning natural light — that lend grandeur to the intimate, the film is personal in essence, even if specifics differ from the director’s off-set life. That line between the personal and the autobiographical might blur a bit; “Our Time” was shot on Reygadas’ family ranch in the small Mexican state of Tlaxcala near Mexico City, with him, his wife Natalia López, and their children cast as lead actors.

Before we meet the couple in disarray, a sun-dappled sequence of children and adolescents engaged in rowdy
See full article at The Wrap »

Interview: Carlos Reygadas – Our Time

Casting his wife, children and himself in his fifth feature film, Carlos Reygadas explores the tricky negotiations of being in an open relationship and thus takes a amped up view of jealousy, control and a lack of control. The three hour text visits philosophical and moral implications in couplehood. A five country co-production, Our Time (Nuestro tiempo) premiered in Venice, played at Tiff and was most recently shown at Rotterdam and then the filmmaker made a stop in Montreal for a Rétrospective Carlos Reygadas: lumières et ténèbres at the Cinémathèque québécoise. We discussed how he thinks about dialogue when mapped in confining spaces, about how mini screens offer moments of clarity and reprieve, we discussed the role of narration and his working relationship with Diego Garcia.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Our Time | Review

Love Like Poison: Reygadas Returns with Frustrating but Forthright Marital Drama

Interminable? Yes. Navel-gazing? Perhaps. But furious in its candor? Absolutely. Carlos Reygadas returns for the first time in six years with his sixth narrative feature, a marital drama which features the director, his wife, and their children acting out alternate versions of themselves in the tritely titled Our Time. Taking its precious and painstaking time to reveal the marital discord between ranch owner Juan and his wife Esther, the first third of this three-hour dilemma is certainly a chore to sit through, yawning drastically into the pitfalls of open relationship issues made more strained thanks to its third member being an English speaker with moderate line delivery.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

New to Streaming: ‘Us,’ ‘Knife + Heart,’ ‘Relaxer,’ ‘The Mustang,’ and More

Note: Following this week’s feature, New to Streaming will be taking a two-week hiatus and return on June 28.

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’re highlighting the noteworthy titles that have recently hit platforms. Check out this week’s selections below and an archive of past round-ups here.

All Good (Eva Trobisch)

What immense health German cinema has found itself in lately. Since the turn of the decade, audiences of a certain ilk have grown accustomed to seeing names like Ade, Petzold, Grisebach, Schanelec, and Köhler show up on art-house and festival screens. We may soon need to add Eva Trobisch to that list. Yes, if All Good (Alles ist gut)–her snare drum taut and timely feature debut–is anything to go by, the East Berlin-born writer-director should provide that rich vein of deutsche Regisseure will its latest transfusion.
See full article at The Film Stage »

NYC Weekend Watch: John Woo, ‘Lifeboat,’ Pauline Kael & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of the Moving Image

A particularly outstanding weekend for “See It Big! Action” offers Big Trouble in Little China on Friday, a John Woo double-bill of Hard Boiled and Face/Off on Saturday, and Die Hard this Sunday.

A Carlos Reygadas series is underway, with all of his pre-Our Time features screening through Sunday.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Rushes: "Ad Astra" Trailer, Coming-of-Age Outfits, First Reformed: Godzilla

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSBarry Jenkins by Liz Seabrook for Little White LiesBarry Jenkins is set to direct a film about the life of the late Alvin Ailey, the choreographer considered one of the most important of the twentieth century. Recommended Viewinga wonderfully lush and eerie trailer for the 4K restoration of Nicolas Roeg's Don't Look Now, which opens in theaters on July 5. The BFI and the Royal Astronomical Society have uncovered the very first film of a solar eclipse, captured by British magician Nevil Maskelyne in 1900. One century after the solar eclipse was first captured on film, arrives the first trailer for James Gray's Ad Astra, which stars Brad Pitt as an astronaut searching for his missing father—who was involved in a government project on extraterrestrial life—in space. The official trailer for Carlos Reygadas's Our Time,
See full article at MUBI »

The Best Movies New to Every Major Streaming Platform in June 2019

Netflix may get most of the attention, but it’s hardly a one-stop shop for cinephiles who are looking to stream essential classic and contemporary films. Each of the prominent streaming platforms — and there are more of them all the time — caters to its own niche of film obsessives. From chilling horror fare on Shudder, to the boundless wonders of the Criterion Channel, and esoteric (but unmissable) festival hits on the newly launched Ovid.tv, IndieWire’s monthly guide will highlight the best of what’s coming to every major streaming site, with an eye towards exclusive titles that may help readers decide which of these services is right for them.

Here’s the best of the best for June 2019.

Amazon Prime

Amazon Prime isn’t offering its subscribers much in the way of exclusives this month, and — for reasons that aren’t entirely clear — the brunt of the platform
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Onward’ First Trailer: Pixar Gets Original Again With Chris Pratt-Tom Holland Elf Adventure

Pixar may be gearing up for the imminent release of what just might be its most hyped sequel yet — this summer’s “Toy Story 4” — but the Disney animation house is also gearing up to make good on its longstanding promise to keep churning out original features alongside its blockbuster franchises. Following up on the success of 2017’s original feature “Coco,” Pixar’s next brand-new, non-series feature is concerned with some classic fantasy stuff: magic, and all the wonderful and weird creatures that come with it.

Set in “a suburban fantasy world,” the film follows “two teenage elf brothers [who] embark on an extraordinary quest in a van named Guinevere to discover if there is still a little magic left in the world.” “Onward” stars Marvel Cinematic Universe superheroes Tom Holland and Chris Pratt as the Lightfoot brothers, Ian and Barley, with Julia Louis-Dreyfus onboard as their mother. Octavia Spencer also
See full article at Indiewire »

U.S. Trailer for ‘Our Time’ Finds Carlos Reygadas Getting Personal

For his latest film, Mexican director Carlos Reygadas looked inward, casting his own family in the 173-minute Our Time, set on a ranch as jealousy interrupts their way of life. Following a premiere on the fall festival circuit, Monument Releasing picked it up for a U.S. release and now a new trailer has arrived ahead of a June 14 release. If you’re looking to catch up on the director’s films, ahead of the theatrical premiere, the Museum of Moving Image will be hosting a Reygadas retrospective from June 8-13, and one can see more details here.

Ethan Vestby said in our Tiff review, “At least based of its original title of Where Life is Born, director Carlos Reygadas’ fifth feature film from the outset seemed to promise the ultimate realization of his festival-approved Transcendental Vision. Yet what we finally received instead six years after his last feature is
See full article at The Film Stage »

Full Us Trailer for Carlos Reygadas' Soul-Searching Drama 'Our Time'

"This is the best place on Earth, Juan." Monument has debuted an official Us trailer for the film Our Time, also known as Nuestro Tiempo, the latest from acclaimed Mexican filmmaker Carlos Reygadas. This initially premiered at the prestigious Venice and Toronto Film Festivals last year to much discussion - some think it's a masterpiece, others not so much, but at least people are talking about Reygadas again. The film is about a family that lives in the Mexican countryside raising fighting bulls. Esther is in charge of running the ranch, while her husband Juan, a renowned poet, raises the beasts. When Esther becomes infatuated with a horse-breaker, Juan seems incapable to reach his own expectations about himself. Indeed a "soul-searching" drama about life and humanity. Starring Carlos Reygadas as Juan, with Natalia López, Natalia López, Maria Hagerman, and Yago Martínez. Definitely worth a watch. Here's the new official Us
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

‘Our Time’ Trailer: Acclaimed Filmmaker Carlos Reygadas Enlists His Wife’s Help In His Latest Family Drama

As far as Mexican filmmakers go, film fans often think of people like Guillermo del Toro, Alfonso Cuarón, and Alejandro González Iñárritu, commonly known as the Three Amigos. But as far as acclaimed directors from that country go, you should probably add Carlos Reygadas to that list. Though not as famous as the aforementioned Amigos, Reygadas has garnered worldwide acclaim, with his latest film “Our Time” touring the film festival circuit last year.

Continue reading ‘Our Time’ Trailer: Acclaimed Filmmaker Carlos Reygadas Enlists His Wife’s Help In His Latest Family Drama at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Our Time’ Trailer: Carlos Reygadas Returns With an Intimate Epic Starring His Own Family

‘Our Time’ Trailer: Carlos Reygadas Returns With an Intimate Epic Starring His Own Family
After wowing audiences with his scorching and personal dramas “Post Tenebras Lux” and “Silent Light,” lauded Mexican auteur Carlos Reygadas returns with his most intimate work yet: a film about a crumbling marriage which stars the filmmaker and his own wife, Natalia López, as a couple dealing with the pain of an unfolding affair. The film also features the couple’s three children, starring as the kids of their characters, bull-breaker Juan and his whipsmart wife Esther.

Per the film’s official synopsis, it follows “a family [that] lives in the Mexican countryside raising fighting bulls. Esther is in charge of running the ranch, while her husband Juan, a world-renowned poet, raises and selects the beasts. When Esther becomes infatuated with a horse-breaker, Juan seems incapable to reach his own expectations about himself.”

The film premiered last year at the Venice Film Festival, and went on to screen at Tiff, Havana,
See full article at Indiewire »

How Quentin Tarantino Saved Cannes, While Abdellatif Kechiche Set It Back a Decade

  • Variety
How Quentin Tarantino Saved Cannes, While Abdellatif Kechiche Set It Back a Decade
Once upon a time in Cannes, a wild-eyed rebel kicked his foot through the basement window of Hollywood, stealing helter skelter from his favorite B-movies and lowbrow genres, and splicing them into the king of all cult movies. Mind you, that was a quarter-century ago, the year Quentin Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction” won the Palme d’Or.

It’s a different world now, and Cannes is a different beast. Unspooling 25 years to the night after “Pulp Fiction,” Tarantino’s latest meta-movie remix, “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood,” may have been the hottest ticket of the event, but the film hardly made the same impact. The 159-minute fetish exercise — an epic homage to dirty feet, neon-lit classic L.A. dives and showbiz in-jokes, set half a century ago, on the eve of the Manson Family murders — got the customary standing ovation following its red-carpet premiere (that’s standard practice at
See full article at Variety »

Agustina San Martin Talks Cannes Special Mention Winner ‘Monster God’

  • Variety
Cannes – An exploration of the ramifications of God, “Monster God,” from Argentina’s Agustina San Martín, took a Special Mention – an effective runner’s up prize – on Saturday night at this year’s Cannes Film Festival short film competition.

It’s not difficult to see why, especially when jury president Claire Denis own films’ power resists reduction to easy explanation.San Martin’s movie builds atmosphere by its association of disparate scenes: Foreboding grey clouds; the thrum of an electricity power plant; its fog-shrouded outline, huge cables like tentacles reaching down from on high; a distant siren’s wail; cows fleeing, jumping a fence; a dark culture girl relete with chain collar, nose pin looks through shrubbery at the window of a gothic house, home to a religious sect.

Also written by San Martín, “Monster God” could be seen to deconstruct the facets of religious domination – fear-inspiring myth, the intoxication of song,
See full article at Variety »

Infinite Fest: Station to Station

  • MUBI
Infinite Fest is a monthly column by festival programmer and film critic Eric Allen Hatch, author of the “Why I Am Hopeful” article for Filmmaker Magazine, tackling the state of cinema as expressed by North American film festivals.Suns CinemaIndependent film—true, actual, literal independent film production, the narrow interlocking strata of the art form that drift untrammeled atop the massive bedrock of corporate curation—isn’t only a subculture, but is also in a state of confusion. Seemingly in defiance of the homogenizing pressure the internet applies on all other aspects of society, the film landscape looks quite different from city to city. Many of those differences speak to population size and resources, but others sprout from resilient regional taste, individual initiative, and old-fashioned scene-building centered around activity from a key filmmaker, curator, organization, and/or venue. Time and time again, today’s cinema brings me back to one
See full article at MUBI »

Battles on Earth and in Heaven

  • MUBI
Carlos Reygadas's Battle in Heaven (2005) and Silent Light (2007) are showing April and May, 2019 on Mubi in the United States as part of the series What Is an Auteur?Battle in HeavenEmerging six years after Post Tenebras Lux (2012), Our Time, the latest film from Mexican auteur Carlos Reygadas, offers an unsparing account of a marriage in crisis. Starring the director and his real-life spouse Natalia López (and their children), the film depicts a couple navigating the difficult terrain of an open relationship. Characteristically, Our Time disavows many of the conventions of cinema, adopting an approach that mirrors non-fiction filmmaking to capture the beauty and intimacy of the daily life of the couple and their clan. Shifting his gaze from the human drama at the center of the narrative to the rich environment of the family’s ranch and its surroundings, the director asks challenging questions about the nature of romantic
See full article at MUBI »

Criterion Collection: Japón (2002) | Blu-ray Review

Nearly two decades after the acclaim it received in Un Certain Regard at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival, Carlos Reygadas’ inexplicable debut Japón remains an enigmatic juxtaposition of the sacred and profane. Earning well-deserved comparison to the titans which influenced him, including Tarkovsky and Herzog, Reygadas jumpstarted a post-Mexican New Wave at the dawn of the last century, which would eventually include Michel Franco and favored acolytes, such as Amat Escalante. Unlike the previous batch of lauded Mexican contemporaries, Reygadas has avoided the Hollywood film machine, instead sticking close to home and inveigling himself with contemporary social ills displayed in semi-inscrutable narratives—even avoiding English language characters up until 2018’s Our Time, his most insular and psychologically intimate venture to date.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »
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