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Our 20 Most-Anticipated Films of the 2018 Cannes Film Festival

The Cannes Film Festival, cinema’s most esteemed yearly event, begins in just a few days. While we’ll soon be on the ground providing coverage, today brings a preview of what we’re most looking forward to among the eclectic line-up, ranging from films in competition to select titles on the various sidebars. Check out our most-anticipated features below and follow our complete coverage here throughout the month. Make sure to also follow our contributors on Twitter: Giovanni Marchini Camia and Rory O’Connor.

20. The Man Who Killed Don Quixote (Terry Gilliam)

Hopefully a genuinely worthwhile film rather than a curio as it relates to its long-plagued production history, it’s still not precisely confirmed that Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote will actually be legally approved to premiere at the festival. Let’s hope those issues get ironed out in the next few days,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Major film industry gender equality movement launches in France

Major film industry gender equality movement launches in France
Signatories to the initiative, called Collectif 5050x2020, include Léa Seydoux, Lily-Rose Depp.

Some 300 professionals from across the French cinema world have signed up to a new movement called the Collectif 5050x2020 demanding more gender equality and diversity in the country’s film industry.

The aim of the initiative, launched on the eve of the country’s prestigious César film awards this evening, is to put in place concrete steps to bring about equality across the business, says film sales executive Bérénice Vincent, co-founder and spokesperson for the collective.

The initiative is among a raft of gender equality campaigns to have
See full article at ScreenDaily »

First look at Golshifteh Farahani in Eva Husson's 'Girls Of The Sun' (exclusive)

The picture is expected to premiere at a major film festival this year.

Source: Elle Driver

‘Girls Of The Sun’

Screen can reveal an exclusive first look (above) at Golshifteh Farahani in the role of a female Kurdish fighter in French director Eva Husson’s Girls Of The Sun.

Farahani plays Bahar, the commander-in-chief of a Kurdish female battalion known as “The Girls of the Sun”, who is preparing to take back the town where she and her family were captured by extremists.

Cannes best actress winner Emmanuelle Bercot (Mon Roi) co-stars as journalist Mathilde who is embedded with the female fighters to cover the early days of the offensive.

Through their encounter, Bahar’s experiences since the arrival of the extremists who changed the course of her life slowly resurface.

The role comes amid a busy period for versatile, Paris-based Farahani who also recently played the lead in The Song Of Scorpions, appeared in Pirates
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Tiff Announces Platform Lineup, Including ‘The Death of Stalin,’ ‘Euphoria,’ and ‘Brad’s Status’

Tiff Announces Platform Lineup, Including ‘The Death of Stalin,’ ‘Euphoria,’ and ‘Brad’s Status’
No pressure or anything, but last year’s Toronto International Film Festival Platform section turned out a Best Picture winner.

Now in only its third year, the festival’s director-driven program aims to showcase original names in international cinema, and has steadily become one of the most exciting sections of the annual festival. Last year, it played home to such gems as “Moonlight,” “Jackie,” and “Lady MacBeth,” following its inaugural year, where it bowed titles like “High-Rise,” “Bang Gang,” and “Land of Mine.”

Read MoreTIFF Reveals First Slate of 2017 Titles, Including ‘The Shape of Water,’ ‘Downsizing,’ and ‘Call Me By Your Name

This year promises to only further the mission of the section, thanks to 12 titles that speak to the breadth of modern cinema, and some of the rising stars it’s currently fostering. “Platform is the place to look for the distinct stamp of today’s most interesting directors as they establish their reputations,” said Cameron Bailey, Tiff’s Artistic Director, in a statement.

This year’s lineup hails from eight countries on five continents. The films will compete for the Platform Prize, to be awarded by a jury that includes award-winning filmmakers Chen Kaige, Malgorzata Szumowska, and Wim Wenders.

Read MoreTIFF Announces Midnight Madness and Documentaries Slate, Including ‘The Disaster Artist,’ ‘Super Size Me’ Sequel, and More

The section will open with the world premiere of “The Death of Stalin,” from award-winning director-writer Armando Iannucci, which “follows the final days leading up to the Soviet dictator’s death.” “Sweet Country,” a period Western from acclaimed Australian filmmaker Warwick Thornton, will close out the section.

Other highlights include Mike White’s Ben Stiller-starring “Brad’s Status” and Clio Barnard’s “Dark River,” along with Lisa Langseth’s “Euphoria,” starring Alicia Vikander and Eva Green as sisters on a mysterious trip.

“The films unveiled today embody our bold vision for the programme, and our ongoing commitment to showcase artistic and inventive directors that fearlessly push boundaries,” said Piers Handling, Director and CEO of Tiff. “The twelve titles exemplify bravery, dynamism and a unique voice in storytelling that we look for when curating the Platform programme.”

Below are the newest additions to the Tiff 2017 lineup, including the Platform program. Stay tuned for more programming announcements in the days to come.

The Toronto International Film Festival runs September 7 – 17 in Toronto, Canada.

Platform

Beast,” Michael Pearce, United Kingdom, World Premiere

“Brad’s Status,” Mike White, USA, World Premiere

“Custody,” Xavier Legrand, France, North American Premiere

Dark River,” Clio Barnard, United Kingdom, World Premiere

“The Death of Stalin,” Armando Iannucci, France/United Kingdom/Belgium, World Premiere, Platform Opening Film

Euphoria,” Lisa Langseth, Sweden/Germany, World Premiere

“If You Saw His Heart,” Joan Chemla, France, World Premiere

“Mademoiselle Paradis,” Barbara Albert, Austria/Germany, World Premiere

“Razzia,” Nabil Ayouch, France, World Premiere

“The Seen and Unseen,” Kamila Andini, Indonesia, World Premiere

Sweet Country,” Warwick Thornton, Australia, North American Premiere, Platform Closing Film

“What Will People Say: (Hva vil folk si), Iram Haq, Norway/Germany/Sweden, World Premiere

Sign UpStay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here. Related stories'Euphoria' and 'Submergence' New Looks: Alicia Vikander is Ready to Conquer Film Festival SeasonTIFF's Platform Selection: How the Festival's Buzziest Slate is Pivoting After Launching 'Moonlight'Isabelle Huppert, Noomi Rapace, and Bodybuilders: 7 Must-See Summer Movies From the 2017 Locarno Film Festival
See full article at Indiewire »

You’ve Never Seen a Movie About Terrorism Quite Like ‘Nocturama’ — Watch

You’ve Never Seen a Movie About Terrorism Quite Like ‘Nocturama’ — Watch
There’s never been a movie about terrorism quite like “Nocturama.”

Fresh off his emotionally extravagant biopic of fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent, director Bertrand Bonello has returned with another film about the seductive power of surfaces. With his previous project, he presented that idea as his subject — with this one, he sublimates it directly into his style. The result is a portrait of weaponized radicalism that has almost no resemblance to terrorism as we know it, and yet sometimes feels all more accurate because of that. Beguiling from the start and oblique until the bitter end, “Nocturama” is such an essential, illuminating movie about modern terrorism precisely because it refuses to offer any solutions to its carnage, or even explicitly diagnose the problems that give rise to it.

Read More: ‘Nocturama’ Trailer: A Group of Teens Plan a Terrorist Attack in Paris in Bertrand Bonello’s New Thriller

Conceived
See full article at Indiewire »

Julie Delpy Joins Eva Husson’s ‘Girls Of The Sun’; Elle Driver Boards Worldwide Sales – Cannes

Julie Delpy Joins Eva Husson’s ‘Girls Of The Sun’; Elle Driver Boards Worldwide Sales – Cannes
Exclusive: Julie Delpy is set to join Golshifteh Farahani in Eva Husson’s Girls of the Sun, which Paris-based Elle Driver is selling to buyers at the Cannes Film Festival this month. The project, which is directed by Bang Gang‘s Eva Husson is about a battalion of female resistance fighters who unite to take back their small Kurdish town that has been conquered by extremists. Maneki Films’ Didar Domehri produces the story, which is largely a tale of resistance, sisterhood…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Rotterdam ’17: Its International Film Festival and Cinemart

Rotterdam ’17: Its International Film Festival and Cinemart
What a surprising city Rotterdam is and the Festival and Cinemart are full of surprises too.

Being in The Netherlands is like a homecoming for me. My first major job in the film industry was with 20th Century Fox International and City Fox Films in Amsterdam in 1975 which is when I first attended the International Film Festival of Rotterdam, three years after its founding by Huub Bals. It was much smaller then. Iffr’s logo is a tiger, loosely based on the M.G.M. lion as an alternative. From the beginning, the festival has profiled itself as a promoter of alternative, innovative and non-commercial films, with an emphasis on the Far East and developing countries. It has become one of the most important events in the film world, an integral part of the winter circuit of Sundance, Rotterdam and Berlin Film Festivals.

Fox and HIs Friends

Except for my
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Rotterdam ‘17: International Film Festival and Cinemart

Rotterdam ‘17: International Film Festival and Cinemart
Though the International Film Festival Rotterdam (Iffr) is going on its 46th year and its Cinemart on its 35th, 2017 marks only the third year since festival director Bero Beyer, a former producer, continues to reshape the event into a more focused selection of film projects whose life on the film circuit will have an impact beyond the festival scene itself, a field that is becoming increasingly crowded for many reasons which would take another article to explain.

But there will be quite a discussion about this very issue.The Rotterdam Cinemart, the first co-production market ever, started in 1982 and brought the then-small international film community together in a uniquely egalitarian and intimate way that only the Dutch could offer. In many ways it became a victim of its own success, mentoring similar events in Hong Kong and So. Korea and then copied by numerous others, but without the care and warmth of the original event.
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

336 Films Eligible for the Oscar Race

Oopsie. In the Holiday rush we forgot to share one of the most important lists, the list of which films can be nominated for Oscars (in regular categories -- speciality categories like "best foreign language film" having their own rules). Every year the list is a wee bit odd if you really take a deep dive at it because it's filled with movies you haven't heard of as well as missing a few movies you have. Why is that? Because the list is made up of films which met two requirements.

1) Each film played for a week long engagement in Los Angeles that you could buy tickets to like you would any movie (i.e. not a festival engagement alone) and...

2) Films which did that and then Also submitted paperwork to the Academy to be eligible.

The most important film that is missing this year (apparently due to requirement #2) is acclaimed Aquarius starring Sonia Braga.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Iffr: Gabriel Mascaro, Eva Husson, Ben Rivers set for CineMart 2017

  • ScreenDaily
A total of 26 film projects will participate in this year’s co-production market in Rotterdam.Scroll down for full line-up

The line-up for the 2017 edition of the International Film Festival Rotterdam (Iffr) co-production market CineMart has been revealed.

The 34th edition of the co-pro event features 26 projects and will run Jan 29 – Feb 1 as part of the Iffr Pro Days industry strand of the wider festival (Jan 25 – Feb 5).

Film-makers presenting projects at this year’s edition include Brazilian director Gabriel Mascaro, whose 2015 feature Neon Bull [pictured] won prizes in Venice and Toronto. His next project is titled Centre Of The Earth.

Also participating in the event will be UK director Ben Rivers, whose credits include The Sky Trembles And The Earth Is Afraid And The Two Eyes Are Not Brothers. His latest project, After London, is being produced by Ben Wheatley’s Rook Films. Rivers previously won Rotterdam’s Tiger Award for his 2014 short film Things.

Nepalese director
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘La La Land,’ ‘Jackie,’ and ‘Free Fire’ Lead Tiff 2016 Award Winners

With the Toronto International Film Festival wrapping up today, they’ve handed out their award winners. While our top picks will be arriving shortly, the big winner of the festival was Damien Chazelle‘s La La Land, which won the People’s Choice Awards, while Raoul Peck‘s I Am Not Your Negro won on the documentary side. Other winners include Free Fire in the Midnight Madness category and Jackie in the Platform section, which is in its second year.

Check out the full press release below.

The short film awards below were selected by a jury comprised of American filmmaker Abteen Bagheri (That B.E.A.T.), French filmmaker Eva Husson (Bang Gang), and Canadian filmmaker Jeff Barnaby (Rhymes for Young Ghouls).

Short Cuts Award For Best Canadian Short Film

The Short Cuts Award for Best Canadian Short Film goes to Alexandre Dostie’s Mutants. The jury remarked, “Mutants
See full article at The Film Stage »

New to Streaming: ‘The Wailing,’ ‘Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising,’ ‘Nuts!,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

From Afar (Lorenzo Vigas)

Proving yet again that festival juries don’t read the trades or pay attention to chatter, the Golden Lion of the 72nd Venice Film Festival was presented to the Venezuelan drama From Afar, a film that screened relatively late at the fest, when general opinion on the Lido seemed to have settled on this being a race between some other titles. In a discerning and gutsy move,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Nocturama’ Is ‘Elephant’ For The The Age Of Isis — Tiff Review

  • Indiewire
‘Nocturama’ Is ‘Elephant’ For The The Age Of Isis — Tiff Review
“We did what we had to do,” argues one of the beautiful terrorist teens in Bertrand Bonello’s “Nocturama,” a vague and intriguingly inert thriller that waits 50 minutes before revealing “what they had to do” and never bothers explaining why they had to do it. It’s hypnotic all the same. Fresh off his emotionally extravagant biopic of fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent, Bonello has returned with another film about the seductive power of surfaces. With his previous project, he presented that idea as his subject — with this one, he sublimates it directly into his style. The result is a portrait of radical violence that has almost no resemblance to terrorism as we know it, and yet sometimes feels all more accurate because of that.

Bonello might keep the context to a minimum, but you can tell almost immediately that something bad is about to go down in the heart of Paris.
See full article at Indiewire »

New to Streaming: ‘De Palma,’ ‘Sunset Song,’ ‘Melancholia,’ ‘The Jungle Book,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Blood Father (Jean-François Richet)

If this be the movie jail that Mel Gibson is destined to die in, it could be a whole lot worse. Blood Father, directed by Jean-François Richet (Mesrine, Assault on Precinct 13), works remarkably well as a grindhouse throwback, sporting a screenplay (from Peter Craig and Andrea Berloff, based on Craig’s novel) that’s better than it has any right to be.
See full article at The Film Stage »

UK distributor Metrodome placed in administration

  • ScreenDaily
Most staff made redundant, Screen understands.

UK distributor Metrodome Group has been placed into administration with most staff made redundant, Screen understands.

Multiple sources at the company, founded in 1995, have confirmed the news but Metrodome has yet to release an official statement.

UK accountancy firm Cowgill Holloway is understood to be handling the administration but are unavailable for comment.

Staff were informed of the insolvency and redundancies today. The swiftness of the move is understood to have taken employees by surprise with one staff member telling Screen that colleagues “are in shock”.

The company had been seeking a buyer in recent months but recently told Screen it had expected to attend upcoming markets as usual. In the same interview, the company confirmed that it had 32 staff.

UK distributor 101 Films is understood to have taken some of the company’s assets. However, the Brighton-based firm was unavailable for comment.

Long-time Metrodome managing director Jezz Vernon stepped down from
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Vanishing point by Anne-Katrin Titze

Clément Cogitore on Michelangelo Antonioni and Apichatpong Weerasethakul: "who are my masters" Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Nicholas Ray's Bitter Victory starring Richard Burton and Curd Jürgens to Stanley Kubrick's Paths Of Glory with Kirk Douglas, Ralph Meeker and Adolphe Menjou come to mind or the tension built with Kip (Naveen Andrews) checking for mines in Anthony Minghella's The English Patient, based on Michael Ondaatje's novel when reflecting on Neither Heaven Nor Earth (Ni Le Ciel Ni La Terre).

Jérémie Renier is Captain Antarès Bonassieu

Clément Cogitore's haunting debut feature stars Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne discovery Jérémie Renier with Kévin Azaïs (Thomas Cailley's Love At First Fight, Catherine Corsini's Summertime), Swann Arlaud (Axelle Ropert's The Apple Of My Eye), Finnegan Oldfield (Thomas Bidegain's Les Cowboys, Eva Husson's Bang Gang), Sâm Mirhosseini, Marc Robert, Hamid Reza Javdan (Atiq Rahimi's The Patience Stone), Edouard Court,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Metrodome MD Jezz Vernon to step down

  • ScreenDaily
Exclusive: Vernon to depart after 11 years at UK distributor; John Ramchandani to assume “broader role”.

Metrodome MD Jezz Vernon (above) is to leave the company at the end of next month after 11 years at the distribution firm, three in the role of MD.

John Ramchandani (right), currently MD of subsidiary label Hollywood Classics, will assume a “broader role” within the Metrodome Group, which has said it will take Vernon’s departure as an “opportunity to streamline the organisation structure at the higher levels.”

“We are taking the opportunity to streamline the organisation structure at the higher levels going forward,” the company said in a statement to Screen.

John Ramchandani, currently responsible for Hollywood Classics (representing the international rights on behalf of 20th Century Fox, MGM, Universal amongst others) and who has extensive experience within Metrodome Distribution from his previous roles will, in addition to maintaining his pre-eminent role in Hc, take a broader
See full article at ScreenDaily »

All to play for by Anne-Katrin Titze

Nicolas Pariser, Alice Winocour, Melvil Poupaud, Mathieu Lamboley, uniFrance President Jean-Paul Salomé Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Melvil Poupaud walked the Rendez-Vous with French Cinema red carpet with The Great Game (Le Grand Jeu) director Nicolas Pariser, Disorder's Alice Winocour, Julie Delpy's Lolo composer Mathieu Lamboley, Bang Gang's Eva Husson, A Decent Man's Emmanuel Finkiel, John Waters, Cindy Sherman, James Ivory, Angélique Kidjo, Aurélia Thiérrée with Guillaume Nicloux and his Valley Of Love star Isabelle Huppert.

Joseph Paskin (André Dussollier) Pierre Blum (Melvil Poupaud)

Oscar Isaac in Jc Chandor's A Most Violent Year, Alain Delon in Valerio Zurlini's Indian Summer (Le Professeur), Benoît Jacquot's Closet Children (Les Enfants Du Placard), Marguerite Duras, Eric Rohmer, Xavier Dolan, Justine Triet, Fan Bingbing, and his Great Game co-stars Clémence Poésy and André Dussollier - these and more entered into a kind of Lacanian conversation with Melvil Poupaud at the Parker Meridien in New York.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

‘Les Cowboys’ Review: This Contemporary Remake Of ‘The Searchers’ Is Shooting Blanks

‘Les Cowboys’ Review: This Contemporary Remake Of ‘The Searchers’ Is Shooting Blanks
It’s hard to blame Thomas Bidegain for thinking that a contemporary remake of “The Searchers” might be a good idea. After all, the same virulent otherness that pumped through John Ford’s classic Western is at the heart of the Islamophobia that plagues modern Europe, and has percolated beneath the surface of its cinema since at least “The Battle of Algiers.” The recent attacks in Paris and Belgium, neither of which occurred until long after “Les Cowboys” was in the can, only serve to add a greater sense of urgency to Bidegain’s film, a vigilante tale whose wayward white hero is stymied by the same cultural divide that terrorists sacrifice their lives in order to deepen and expand.

But Bidegain’s update, however clever and opportunistic it might be, inevitably runs into a problem that didn’t affect the original: It’s not directed by John Ford.

Which
See full article at Indiewire »

Arthouse Audit: ‘Tickled’ Leads Long List of Modest Openers

It’s only June and it already feels like the dog days of summer. No breakouts. A slew of niche titles, including several documentaries. This week’s standout is Sundance doc hit “Tickled” (Magnolia), which is showing some potential.

This week’s range of titles is wide and diverse. Some boast high festival and/or review pedigrees, and many come from distributors who aren’t reporting numbers (we offer estimates; “Parched,” an Indian indie from Wolfe Releasing and “2016 Sundance Film Festival Short Film Tour” remained elusive).

Meantime, “Love & Friendship” (Roadside Attractions) and “The Lobster” (A24) continue to thrive ahead of other recent releases and “Maggie’s Plan” (Sony Pictures Classics) keeps going, along with doc standout “Weiner” (IFC).

Opening

“Tickled” (Magnolia) – Metacritic: 77; Festivals include: Sundance, San Francisco, Seattle 2016

$24,000 in 2 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $12,000

After its strong reaction contending at Sundance’s World Documentary competition, this expose of the
See full article at Indiewire »
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