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Burning Review

  • HeyUGuys
Paranoia, moral ambiguity and jealousy take centre stage in Lee Chang-dong’s faultlessly-executed new film Burning. Based on a short story by Haruki Murakami entitled Barn Burning, the film mixes drama and intrigue to tell one of the most thought-provoking and utterly devastating stories of the year so far. Starring South Korean star Ah-in Yoo and Korean-American actor Steven Yeun (The Walking Dead), Burning is set in modern day South Korea where old traditions and an ever-advancing consumerist culture live happily side by side.

Ah-in Yoo (Six Flying Dragon) is Jong-su, a young aspiring writer fresh out of university and still unsure of what he wants to do with his life. On a rare visit to the capital, Jong-su meets Hae-mi (Jong-seo Jun), an outgoing sales hostess who recognises him from their school days in the countryside. The two soon hit it off and Jong-su is invited to go back
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Movie Review – Burning (2018)

Burning, 2018.

Directed by Chang-dong Lee.

Starring Ah-In Yoo, Jong-seo Jeon, and Steven Yeun.

Synopsis:

Jong-su, a part-time worker, bumps into Hae-mi while delivering, who used to live in the same neighborhood. Hae-mi asks him to look after her cat while she’s on a trip to Africa. When Hae-mi comes back, she introduces Ben, a mysterious guy she met in Africa, to Jong-su. One day, Ben visits Jong-su’s with Hae-mi and confesses his own secret hobby.

Don’t let the monstrous running time steer you away from Burning, Chang-dong Lee’s latest meticulously crafted effort, that cleverly explores a wide variety of subjects ranging from the dark side of the male gaze, the double lives that people hide, societal class rankings, various incarnations of mental instability, and Korean political issues all wrapped up into a glacially paced thriller that, despite its snail-like crawl to its fireworks grand finale, always
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Steven Yeun on the Mysteries of ‘Burning,’ Korean Christianity, Nihilism, and ‘RoboCop’

Burning, director Lee Chang-dong’s long-awaited return to the cinema, is brimming with the Rashomon effect. The film will have you questioning what you see, and what you think you know. Many facts appear as objective in the film to justify a personal reading of the narrative. But to reduce Burning to its connective tissue is a disservice to the experience of shutting up, letting go, and enjoying the new work from the master filmmaker and his newest collaborator, Steven Yeun.

Yeun’s imprint is expanding beyond The Walking Dead into films like Okja, Sorry to Bother You, and now Burning. Through one lens, Yeun plays Ben, the cosmopolitan who burns down greenhouses for the thrill of it. Another take on Ben could be the sex-trafficking globalist. There’s more than a binary choice to understand Ben, like all people and all characters. However you interpret him, Ben is a nihilist with fuzzy motives.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Steven Yeun: Sustaining The Other Vertices in Lee Chang-dong’s Burning

Jong-Su (Ah-In Yoo) meets Hae-Mi (Jong-Seo Jeon) dancing at a storefront display beside a lottery machine. Her dance partner projects keywords over a Pa system and through a K-Pop deluge. They are lures. Hae-Mi has rigged the whole raffle, Jong-Su wins a pink wristwatch (per her intervention) and she expects he’ll gift it back to her. This is no meet-cute, it’s an odd-reunion, Hae-Mi reveals to Jong-Su, her old friend. They grew up together, but Jong-Su either can’t remember or can’t recognize her post-plastic surgery. He won’t forget her now. These two characters thicken and sink to form […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Steven Yeun: Sustaining The Other Vertices in Lee Chang-dong’s Burning

Jong-Su (Ah-In Yoo) meets Hae-Mi (Jong-Seo Jeon) dancing at a storefront display beside a lottery machine. Her dance partner projects keywords over a Pa system and through a K-Pop deluge. They are lures. Hae-Mi has rigged the whole raffle, Jong-Su wins a pink wristwatch (per her intervention) and she expects he’ll gift it back to her. This is no meet-cute, it’s an odd-reunion, Hae-Mi reveals to Jong-Su, her old friend. They grew up together, but Jong-Su either can’t remember or can’t recognize her post-plastic surgery. He won’t forget her now. These two characters thicken and sink to form […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Steven Yeun Deserves an Oscar Nomination for ‘Burning,’ His First Major Role Since ‘The Walking Dead’

Steven Yeun Deserves an Oscar Nomination for ‘Burning,’ His First Major Role Since ‘The Walking Dead’
A year had passed since Steven Yeun left “The Walking Dead,” the AMC show that put him on the map, and he had yet to figure out his next moves. He landed a supporting role in “Okja,” Bong Joon-ho’s wacky sci-fi adventure, and followed the English-language ensemble to Cannes. Someone asked him if he wanted to work with other Korean directors. Yeun, who was born in Seoul but raised in Michigan, hesitated.

“You just say things to answer questions, never thinking of any of it will come true,” said Yeun, over a year later. So he mentioned Lee Chang-dong, the monumental Korean filmmaker whose work Yeun discovered early in his career.

The interview got passed around, first to screenwriter Oh Jungmi, and then to Lee. The pair were co-writing “Burning,” a vivid, lyrical adaptation of a Haruki Murakami short story. The movie, which premiered at Cannes, revolves around introverted
See full article at Indiewire »

Fantasia 2012: ‘Punch’ packs a surprisingly light touch

Punch

Directed by Han Lee

Written by Dong-Woo Kim

South Korea: 2011

Contrary to popular belief, the Fantasia International Film Festival is not some movie haven for those seeking pure thrills via genre pictures. True to its traditions, the event awards screen time to some the world’s more outlandish movies, from pure gore fests, ghost stories, the most mind bending psychological thrillers and, a personal favourite, martial arts films. That being said, if one takes the time to carefully look through the lineup, one will come to understand that simpler films can be discovered, little gems that concentrate much more on the drama than on the shrieks. Punch, from South Korean director Han Lee, comes to the festival as an alternative to all those ‘weird’ movies, offering a coming of age story, albeit one with some attitude.

Wan-deuk (Ah In Yoo) is a teenage loner. He has few friends at school,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Fantasia 2012: Week one wrap up

We are now a week into the three week long Fantasia Film Festival, and while we admittedly have been a little behind due to some technical issues with our website, we still managed to get a dozen film reviews published. Keep coming back to our site as we promise twice the amount of articles by the end of week two. In the meantime, here is a round-up of what we’ve seen and written about so far.

Black Pond

Directed by Tom Kingsley and Will Sharpe

Written by Will Sharpe

U.K., 2011

Comedy, in its nature and its presentation, has morphed dramatically over the past decade or so, both in North America and in Europe, in particular the United Kingdom. From the more overt, on the nose comedy of yesteryear we have now live in an era in which the comedy is delivered with a completely different version of wit.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Fantasia 2012: ‘Punch’ packs a surprisingly light touch

Punch

Directed by Han Lee

Written by Dong-Woo Kim

South Korea: 2011

Contrary to popular belief, the Fantasia International Film Festival is not some movie haven for those seeking pure thrills via genre pictures. True to its traditions, the event awards screen time to some the world’s more outlandish movies, from pure gore fests, ghost stories, the most mind bending psychological thrillers and, a personal favourite, martial arts films. That being said, if one takes the time to carefully look through the lineup, one will come to understand that simpler films can be discovered, little gems that concentrate much more on the drama than on the shrieks. Punch, from South Korean director Han Lee, comes to the festival as an alternative to all those ‘weird’ movies, offering a coming of age story, albeit one with some attitude.

Wan-deuk (Ah In Yoo) is a teenage loner. He has few friends at school,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

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