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10 Great ‘Small’ Movies You Might Have Missed in the 2010s, From ‘Manakamana’ to ‘The Fits’ (Photos)

  • The Wrap
10 Great ‘Small’ Movies You Might Have Missed in the 2010s, From ‘Manakamana’ to ‘The Fits’ (Photos)
The films on this admittedly non-comprehensive list were not distributed by major studios, but by smaller specialty companies. They played for a couple of weeks (or less) in big cities, maybe even just one night in a museum. They weren’t on the multiplex radar at all. But to adventurous film audiences, they were a vital part of any discussion about cinema. They told complex stories ignored by major studios. The dug deeper into abstraction or discomfort. And they pushed at the edges of filmmaking practice in ways that will influence the mainstream in the future.

Cemetery of Splendor” (2015)

A makeshift hospital on an ancient royal burial ground houses soldiers overcome with a mysterious sleeping sickness. Then they begin psychically communicating with the women who work there. Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s oblique, delicate story of historical memory and collective awakening that plays out like a dream.

“Did You Wonder Who Fired The Gun?
See full article at The Wrap »

Full Line-up Announced for 41st Annual Portland International Film Festival

Earlier today the folks at the Northwest Film Center announced the full line-up for this year’s Portland International Film Festival, and have published a Pdf for all to read online. The printed copies will be making their way around town this week.

The Northwest Film Center is proud to reveal the 41st Portland International Film Festival (Piff 41) lineup. This year’s Festival begins on Thursday, February 15th and runs through Thursday, March 1st. Our Opening Night selection is the new comedy The Death of Stalin from writer/director Armando Iannucci (Veep, In the Loop). The film, adapted from the graphic novel by Fabien Nury, stars Steve Buscemi, Olga Kurylenko, Jason Isaacs, and Michael Palin. The Death of Stalin will screen simultaneously on Opening Night at the Whitsell Auditorium, located in the Portland Art Museum (1219 Sw Park Ave) and on two screens at Regal Fox Tower 10 (846 Sw Park Ave).

Check
See full article at CriterionCast »

AFI Fest 2017 Announces Indie Additions, Including ‘Bodied,’ ‘Mr. Roosevelt,’ ‘Thoroughbreds,’ and Many More

AFI Fest 2017 Announces Indie Additions, Including ‘Bodied,’ ‘Mr. Roosevelt,’ ‘Thoroughbreds,’ and Many More
The American Film Institute (AFI) has announced the films that will be featured in their New Auteurs and American Independents sections at the upcoming AFI Fest 2017 presented by Audi. Selections include a number of lauded features from around the festival circuit, including Cannes offerings like “I Am Not a Witch,” SXSW favorites like “Gemini” and “Mr. Roosevelt,” the Sundance breakout “Thoroughbreds,” and Joseph Kahn’s Toronto Midnight Madness favorite “Bodied,” among others.

Highlighting first- and second-time feature film directors, New Auteurs is designed as the festival’s platform for upcoming filmmakers from all over the world to showcase their new films. This year, the section includes 11 films, nine of which come from female directors. Similarly, AFI Fest’s American Independents section aims to represent the best of this year’s independent filmmaking. Pushing boundaries of form and content across narrative and documentary cinema, this section includes 11 films from both fresh
See full article at Indiewire »

New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup

New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup
The 55th New York Film Festival will debut a starry roster of documentaries featuring giants of the art and literary worlds as well as Alex Gibney’s postponed “No Stone Unturned,” a critical investigation into the 1994 Loughinisland massacre in Ireland, which was pulled from Tribeca in April.

Other new works include films from directors Abel Ferrara, Sara Driver, Nancy Buirski, Mathieu Amalric, and Barbet Schroeder; Vanessa Redgrave’s directorial debut “Sea Sorrow,” which played at Cannes; and films featuring Joan Didion, Arthur Miller, Gay Talese, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Jane Goodall, plus stories about racism, American immigration, and the global refugee crisis.

Three documentaries spotlight acclaimed writers, including the world premiere of Griffin Dunne’s “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold,” returning Nyff filmmaker Rebecca Miller’s tender portrait of her father, “Arthur Miller: Writer,” and the World Premiere of Myles Kane and Josh Koury’s “Voyeur,” tracking journalist Gay Talese
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup

New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup
The 55th New York Film Festival will debut a starry roster of documentaries featuring giants of the art and literary worlds as well as Alex Gibney’s postponed “No Stone Unturned,” a critical investigation into the 1994 Loughinisland massacre in Ireland, which was pulled from Tribeca in April.

Other new works include films from directors Abel Ferrara, Sara Driver, Nancy Buirski, Mathieu Amalric, and Barbet Schroeder; Vanessa Redgrave’s directorial debut “Sea Sorrow,” which played at Cannes; and films featuring Joan Didion, Arthur Miller, Gay Talese, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Jane Goodall, plus stories about racism, American immigration, and the global refugee crisis.

Three documentaries spotlight acclaimed writers, including the world premiere of Griffin Dunne’s “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold,” returning Nyff filmmaker Rebecca Miller’s tender portrait of her father, “Arthur Miller: Writer,” and the World Premiere of Myles Kane and Josh Koury’s “Voyeur,” tracking journalist
See full article at Indiewire »

Berlinale 2017. Elemental Poetics

  • MUBI
There is something anachronic about the desert, something eternal, elemental. The desert exists beyond time, beyond idea; it exists as an experience, as a belief, as a test; as a place of exile, of purification, of spirit. Joshua Bonnetta and J.P. Sniadecki's documentary, El Mar La Mar begins in the desert void—in the darkness of a desert night: wind, crickets, footsteps, a howling in the distance. Sounds reach out from the nocturnal desert, creating an amorphous impression of place, a place which thousands of hopeful migrants must traverse in order to reach the promised Zion of the American Dream.This Sonoran desert is the place of the crossing and its obstacle for the thousands moving flowing towards the U.S., a space broken down in El Mar La Mar into its constitutive elements: Sky. Sand. Mountains. Trees. Fire. Bats. Horses. Men. The cacti, the rocks, the natural elements
See full article at MUBI »

Essence of Time: The Early Documentaries of Sergei Loznitsa

  • MUBI
Mubi's retrospective Film Is a Theorem: The Documentaries of Sergei Loznitsa is showing January 16 - March 15, 2017 in the United Kingdom and many other countries around the world.Landscape“Film is a theorem that has to arrive at a final point.”—Sergei Loznitsa It’s something of a critical cliché to say that a film or filmmaker is fixated on the notion of time; but there aren’t many contemporary filmmakers who fulfill that description as well as Belarus-born director Sergei Loznitsa. Although best known for his recent work—a trio of documentaries, Maidan (2014), The Event (2015) and Austerlitz (2016)—and a brief foray into fiction—My Joy (2010) and In the Fog (2012)—Loznitsa first started out with a string of documentary features and shorts, five of which are part of Mubi’s ongoing retrospective: “Film is a Theorem: The Documentaries of Sergei Loznitsa.” With a methodical, almost scientific rigor (indicative of Loznitsa’s
See full article at MUBI »

How to cross the Us-Mexico border: making El Mar La Mar

Desolate, dangerous and disputed: a film about the boundary in the Sonoran desert could have been a record of tragedy. Instead, Joshua Bonnetta and Jp Sniadecki opted to let the landscape come to the fore

The Sonoran desert is a piece of the American landscape that has evolved as if to edit humanity out of existence. Populated by spiked plants, poisonous insects, rattlesnakes and one of America’s few native big cats, the jaguar, its arid terrain stretches along the Us-Mexican border over a total of 260,000 sq km.

Crossing this wildnerness on foot takes three to five days, and during the summer, daytime temperatures regularly exceed 40°C (104°F). The Us border patrol is alleged to have retrieved 6,029 human remains from this stretch in southern Arizona since the 1990s. The bodies of thousands of others who have tried to enter the Us through the desert may have been bleached away by
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Berlinale 2017. Look Inside Yourself: Talking to Sompot Chidgasornpongse about "Railway Sleepers"

  • MUBI
As a critic, especially if you cover the festival circuit, befriending filmmakers is both a pleasant matter of course and a recurring cause for minor ethical quandaries. When they release a new film, do you avoid writing about it? And if not, will you be able to remain critical even if you dislike it, potentially severing a friendship?It’s therefore with some trepidation that I approached Railway Sleepers by Sompot Chidgasornpongse, whom I’d met in 2014 on the set of Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s Cemetery of Splendour, where he was the 1st Assistant Director (since starting out as an intern on The Adventure of Iron Pussy, Sompot has worked on the majority of Apichatpong’s films). He first told me about his film on the ride back from the shoot one day, during a discussion about the Dardennes’ Two Days, One Night. He wanted to see the Dardennes’ film to
See full article at MUBI »

Berlin: 43 titles revealed for Forum

  • ScreenDaily
Berlin: 43 titles revealed for Forum
World premieres include Barrage, starring Isabelle Huppert and her daughter Lolita Chammah.Scroll down for full list

This year’s Forum programme at the Berlin Film Festival (Feb 9-19), which highlights avant garde and experimental works, will feature 47 films, including 29 world premieres.

These include the premiere of Laura Schroeder’s Barrage, which stars Isabelle Huppert alongside her daughter Lolita Chammah in the story of a young woman who returns to Luxembourg after a 10-year absence to spend time with her estranged child. Huppert plays the grandmother, who has fostered the young girl during that absence.

Read: ‘Barrage’, starring Isabelle Huppert and daughter Lolita, finds sales home

Having its international premiere at Forum this year will be Golden Exits, the new feature from American filmmaker Alex Ross Perry. His previous credits include Queen Of Earth, which premiered at Berlin in 2015. His latest tells the story of a young Australian woman who comes to New York for a few months
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Berlin Film Festival Adds ‘Golden Exits’ and ‘Menashe’ to 2017 Line-Up

Berlin Film Festival Adds ‘Golden Exits’ and ‘Menashe’ to 2017 Line-Up
The 67th Berlin International Film Festival announced 43 additions to its 2017 roster today, including Alex Ross Perry’s “Golden Exits,” Joshua Z. Weinstein’s “Menashe,” and Amman Abbasi’s “Dayveon,” and rounding out much of the festival’s main line-up.

Read More: Berlinale 2017 Will Premiere ‘Logan,’ ‘Trainspotting: T2,’ and Hong Sangsoo’s Latest

Known for its robust variety of programming, the festival previously announced new films from Aki Kaurismaki, Oren Moverman, Sally Potter, Agnieszka Holland, and Sebastian Lelio. More commercial fare includes the international premiere of Danny Boyle’s “Trainspotting” sequel, and the world premiere of James Mangold’s addition to the Wolverine franchise, “Logan.”

Read More: 5 Exciting Films in the 2017 Berlin Film Festival Competition Lineup

The films of the 47th Forum are:

2 + 2 = 22 [The Alphabet] by Heinz Emigholz, Germany – Wp

Adiós entusiasmo (So Long Enthusiasm) of Vladimir Durán, Argentina / Colombia – Wp

At Elske Pia (Pia Loving) by Daniel Joseph Borgmann, Denmark – Wp
See full article at Indiewire »

The Iron Ministry | DVD Review

Last year, 2.5 billion people traveled by rail across the wild expanse of China. With each passing year the country continues to sink massive amounts of money into the high speed infrastructure – this year alone the China Railway Corp. plans to spend a whopping $121.5 billion toward construction and expansion. In The Iron Ministry, the latest feature production from Harvard’s Sensory Ethnography Lab, director/editor/cameraman J.P. Sniadecki attempts to convey what those numbers look like from the inside out. Riding tracks throughout China throughout 2011 and on through 2013 with the camera rolling, Sniadecki’s curious findings flow with affectionate intrigue and an instinctive eye for beauty in the mundane.

The Iron Ministry joins an immense body of train-centric documentary cinema, from its birth back at the beginnings of film itself by way of the Lumière brothers’ Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat through D.A. Pennebaker’s mid-century short Daybreak Express
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

"Cinema on the Edge" on Mubi

  • MUBI
Access to the best of contemporary Chinese independent cinema has been a constant challenge for audiences unable to attend the adventurous film festivals that are the main conduit for these films and filmmakers to the world outside of China. This August a new initiative began—partially crowdfunded on Kickstarter—called Cinema on the Edge, introducing a range of essential, recent independent productions from the mainland across several cinemas in New York City. Mubi is partnering with Cinema on the Edge to extend its theatrical exhibitions to the online world, showing a selection of their films online in the Us, allowing audiences outside of New York to explore what is happening right now in indie Chinese filmmaking. These Chinese films will be premiering on Mubi over the next ten days.Our selection includes:Cut Out The Eyes (Xu Tong, 2014)Er Housheng is a blind musician who travels Inner Mongolia with his
See full article at MUBI »

Daily | Tarantino, Swanberg, Sniadecki

The centerpiece of New York Magazine's fall preview is Lane Brown's wide-ranging interview with Quentin Tarantino. Also in today's roundup: Richard Brody on how Joe Swanberg and his generation have changed the relationship between actor and director; Fabian Cantieri talks with Tag Gallagher, author of essential books on John Ford and Roberto Rossellini; Eric Hynes on J.P. Sniadecki's The Iron Ministry; Dan Callahan on Ruth Chatterton; and we mark the passing of Pierre Jansen, known primarily to cinephiles for his work with Claude Chabrol. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Tarantino, Swanberg, Sniadecki

The centerpiece of New York Magazine's fall preview is Lane Brown's wide-ranging interview with Quentin Tarantino. Also in today's roundup: Richard Brody on how Joe Swanberg and his generation have changed the relationship between actor and director; Fabian Cantieri talks with Tag Gallagher, author of essential books on John Ford and Roberto Rossellini; Eric Hynes on J.P. Sniadecki's The Iron Ministry; Dan Callahan on Ruth Chatterton; and we mark the passing of Pierre Jansen, known primarily to cinephiles for his work with Claude Chabrol. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Joshua Reviews J.P. Sniadecki’s The Iron Ministry [Theatrical Review]

To many, the name J.P. Sniadecki doesn’t ring much of a bell. Even to many storied cinephiles, the young documentarian and his work is a relatively blank spot on their selective film canvas. However, with films like Leviathan and Manakamana, the team at Harvard’s Sensory Ethnography Lab have become some of non-fiction cinema’s most interesting and truly beloved voices. Sniadecki, along with directors like Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Verena Paravel (the latter of which Sniadecki teamed with on the film People’s Park), have risen to the absolute top of the documentary world with their engrossing and experimental motion pictures.

And now it’s time for Sniadecki to go it alone.

With The Iron Ministry comes the latest film out of the Hsel collective, and it’s yet another confounding achievement. Shot over the span of three years on various trains in China, the film is a definitive
See full article at CriterionCast »

Review: See A Moving Biosphere in J.P. Sniadecki's The Iron Ministry

Just like Leviathan and Manakamana before it, J.P. Sniadecki's The Iron Ministry is another striking sensory cinema experience. Closely associated with Havard Sensory Ethnography Lab and its esteemed Colleagues - Julien Castraing-Taylor, Verena Paravel, Stephanie Spray, Pacho Velez and others,  Sniadecki continues exploring the cinematic medium to its new height with the film which takes place entirely on the moving trains in China.Sniadecki, fluent in Mandarin, has been making films in China since 2010. Chaiquian, his first film explored the changing landscape of China and its 'floating people' - mass workers' migration from rural areas to the cities, followed by People's Park - a breathtaking single take film strolling through the Chengdu park, then Yumen, a docu-hybrid taking place in the ghost city of the...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Daily | “Cinema on the Edge”

At Twitch, Christopher Bourne suggests that for "the last decade or so, China has been the source of some of the most provocative, innovative and artful independent fiction films and documentaries being made today." But those that are independently made "cannot be legally shown in China, because they are made outside of the official film system." The Beijing Independent Film Festival has struggled to keep from being shut down, so producer Karen Chien, critic Shelly Kraicer and filmmaker J.P. Sniadecki are bringing the best of the fest to New York. The program, screening at various venues from tomorrow through September 13, features Ai Weiwei's Ping’an Yueqing, Jia Zhitan’s I Want To Be a People’s Representative, Cong Feng's Stratum I: The Visitors, Yang Mingming’s Female Directors and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | “Cinema on the Edge”

At Twitch, Christopher Bourne suggests that for "the last decade or so, China has been the source of some of the most provocative, innovative and artful independent fiction films and documentaries being made today." But those that are independently made "cannot be legally shown in China, because they are made outside of the official film system." The Beijing Independent Film Festival has struggled to keep from being shut down, so producer Karen Chien, critic Shelly Kraicer and filmmaker J.P. Sniadecki are bringing the best of the fest to New York. The program, screening at various venues from tomorrow through September 13, features Ai Weiwei's Ping’an Yueqing, Jia Zhitan’s I Want To Be a People’s Representative, Cong Feng's Stratum I: The Visitors, Yang Mingming’s Female Directors and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

A Worthy Kickstarter to Show the Shuttered Beijing Independent Film Festival’s Selections in the Us

With 20 days to go, the Kickstarter launched by producer/distributor Karin Chien, critic/curator Shelly Kraicer, and filmmaker/anthropologist J.P. Sniadecki has already hit its initial target goal for the purpose of organizing a series showcasing some of the best films shown at the Beijing Independent Film Festival. These works — including People’s Park, a personal favorite film of the last few years co-directed by Sniadecki and Libbie Cohn — were all once screened at the Festival, which was shut down completely last year by Chinese authorities. (You can read more about that here.) The initial funding goals focused on bringing over […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »
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