Bhreagh MacNeil - News Poster

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movies by or about women opening Us/Can from Fri Mar 02

wide

Red Sparrow [my review]

Jennifer Lawrence stars as a Russian spy who uses manipulation to get what she wants. (male writer and director)

limited

Werewolf [IMDb]

Ashley McKenzie writes and directs this drama about outcast drug addicts, costarring Bhreagh MacNeil.

Oh, Lucy! [IMDb]

Atsuko Hirayanagi cowrites and directs this dramedy about a lonely Tokyo woman, played by Shinobu Terajima.

Chasing Great [IMDb]

Michelle Walshe cowrites and codirects this documentary about a (male) rugby player.

Dance Academy: The Comeback [IMDb]

Samantha Strauss writes this drama following the continuing stories of the gender-balanced ensemble from an Australian television show.

Eat Me [IMDb]

Jacqueline Wright writes and costars in this thriller about a woman and the (male) home invader who saves her mid-suicide attempt. (male director)

The Lullaby [IMDb]

Tarryn-Tanille Prinsloo writes this horror movie about a woman, played by Reine Swart, who is having difficulty as a new mother.

Hondros [IMDb]

Jenny Golden cowrites this documentary about a (male) war photojournalist.
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Cycles of Dependency: An Interview with Ashley McKenzie

  • MUBI
Ashley McKenzie’s Werewolf is one of the most accomplished and acclaimed Canadian debut features in recent memory. Set on Cape Breton Island off the East Coast of Nova Scotia, the story follows a methadone addicted couple, Nessa (Bhreagh MacNeil) and Blaise (Andrew Gillis), who are struggling to survive. McKenzie looks at the cycles of dependency that trap these characters in an environment that offers them few escape routes. Living in the woods, waiting for housing support, getting daily methadone doses, and unsuccessfully trying to make ends meet by going door to door mowing people’s lawns, it becomes clear that their relationship is part of what perpetuates their situation. Slowly, Nessa tries to break free. McKenzie’s acute sense of the milieu of her native Cape Breton is reflected in both the authenticity of the performances and the film’s assured formal language that captures the marginal space—figurative
See full article at MUBI »

March 2018 Film Preview

“A Wrinkle in Time”: Disney

It’s Women’s History Month! We can’t think of a better time to celebrate women in film, whether behind the camera or on-screen.

On International Women’s Day (March 8), Netflix debuts “Ladies First,” an inspirational documentary about archer Deepika Kumari, who won a gold medal at the 2010 Commonwealth games. March 9 is the hugely anticipated release of “A Wrinkle in Time,” directed by the visionary Ava DuVernay, who made headlines — and history — when she became the first black female director to helm a live-action feature with a budget over $100 million. “Wrinkle” follows young Meg Murry (Storm Reid) on a fantastical quest through space and time to find her missing father.

Other high-profile releases include March 2’s “Red Sparrow” and March 16’s “Tomb Raider.” The former stars Jennifer Lawrence as a ballerina-turned-spy who decides to exact revenge on those who forced her into a life of espionage.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

March 2018 Film Preview

“A Wrinkle in Time”: Disney

It’s Women’s History Month! We can’t think of a better time to celebrate women in film, whether behind the camera or on-screen.

On International Women’s Day (March 8), Netflix debuts “Ladies First,” an inspirational documentary about archer Deepika Kumari, who won a gold medal at the 2010 Commonwealth games. March 9 is the hugely anticipated release of “A Wrinkle in Time,” directed by the visionary Ava DuVernay, who made headlines — and history — when she became the first black female director to helm a live-action feature with a budget over $100 million. “Wrinkle” follows young Meg Murry (Storm Reid) on a fantastical quest through space and time to find her missing father.

Other high-profile releases include March 2’s “Red Sparrow” and March 16’s “Tomb Raider.” The former stars Jennifer Lawrence as a ballerina-turned-spy who decides to exact revenge on those who forced her into a life of espionage.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

It's Only the End of the World and Operation Avalanche recognized among the 2017 Canadian Screen Award Nominations

  • Cineplex
It's Only the End of the World and Operation Avalanche recognized among the 2017 Canadian Screen Award NominationsIt's Only the End of the World and Operation Avalanche recognized among the 2017 Canadian Screen Award NominationsAdriana Floridia1/17/2017 2:50:00 Pm

This morning the Canadian Screen Awards announced their 2017 nominations, recognizing the best of last year's Canadian films.

The awards are given out by the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television. This year's nominees boast a diverse line up of films that tell stories not just in English and French, but also Mandarin, Atikamekw and Inuktiut.

The most high-profile of the bunch would have to be Xavier Dolan's It's Only the End of the World, which is a likely contender at the Oscars this year in the Best Foreign Language Film category. It made the shortlist of nine films that will be considered at the Oscars, which also includes Germany's Toni Erdmann and Chile's Neruda.
See full article at Cineplex »

[Tiff Review] Werewolf

Writer/director Ashley McKenzie‘s feature debut Werewolf picks up right where her 2012 short When You Sleep left off. We’re back in Canadian squalor on the poverty line with a couple barely staying afloat as society and addiction continuously seeks to drag them under into an abyss of forgotten souls. Frustration abounds as they hide beneath thick skins necessary to survive bureaucratic paper-pushers citing rules and regulations alongside a populace who’d rather ignore than lend a hand. Vanessa (Bhreagh MacNeil) looks defeated mostly, Blaise (Andrew Gillis) enraged with a fire of entitlement that does him absolutely no favors. They should be a team striving tooth and nail for more. But it’s not long before we understand the parasitic relationship masked by a heartbreakingly dangerous love at work.

Heroin’s their drug of choice and an opening prologue depicting a dismal future at the end of a rope
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Werewolf’ Exclusive Clip: Two Methadone Addicts Struggle With Isolation In Small Town

‘Werewolf’ Exclusive Clip: Two Methadone Addicts Struggle With Isolation In Small Town
The 2016 Toronto International Film Festival is almost upon us and it will feature plenty of highly anticipated premieres, but the festival will also debut many films by up-and-coming directors who should be on everyone’s radar. One of these is Ashley McKenzie’s debut feature “Werewolf,” a raw and poetic portrait of the authentic experience of two homeless, twentysomething methadone users in small town Cape Breton. The film follows the lives of Nessa (Bhreagh MacNeil), a waif lost in a harsh world, and Blaise (Andrew Gillis), a creature of impulse who’s easily provoked by his environment. They survive primarily through an underground economy, sleeping in tents, and fighting with bureaucrats and clinic doctors. This relationship drama captures the real humanity of isolated raw pain and the disorientation of modern life. Watch an exclusive clip from the film below.

Read More: Tiff Reveals First Slate of 2016 Titles, Including ‘Magnificent Seven,
See full article at Indiewire »

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