Indie News

Celine Sciamma’s ‘Portrait of a Lady on Fire’ Acquired by Neon and Hulu

Celine Sciamma’s ‘Portrait of a Lady on Fire’ Acquired by Neon and Hulu
Neon and Hulu have acquired the North American rights to Céline Sciamma’s “Portrait of a Lady on Fire,” which premiered Sunday at the Cannes Film Festival in competition, the companies announced Wednesday.

Neon is planning that the love story will get a theatrical release later this year, along with an awards campaign planned for all categories.

Sciamma’s “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” stars Noémie Merlant, Adèle Haenel, Luana Bajrami and Valeria Golino and is set in 1770 in the French region of Brittany. Marianne (Noémie Merlant), a painter, is commissioned to do the wedding portrait of Héloïse (Adèle Haenel), a young woman who has just left the convent. Héloïse is a reluctant bride to be and Marianne must paint her without her knowing. She observes her by day, to paint her secretly.

Also Read: 'Portrait of a Lady on Fire' Film Review: Ravishing Drama Is a
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Rushes: Cannes Clips, Mati Diop, Crafting Cinematography

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSThe late Machiko Kyo in Cannes, c. 1960.Machiko Kyo, the star of Akira Kurosawa's Rashomon, Kenji Mizoguchi's Ugetsu, and Teinosuke Kinugasa's Gate of Hell, has passed away at the age of 95. Recommended VIEWINGThe 2nd trailer for Quentin Tarantino's Once Upon A Time In Hollywood, which expands further upon the film's storytelling ambitions, comic tone, and inspired casting. Janus Films has released the trailer for its new restoration of Paris is Burning, Jennie Livingston's seminal 1990 documentary on New York City drag ball culture. Ahead of its June 21 release, the final trailer for Toy Story 4 promises road trip adventures and, as per usual, some existential mayhem regarding what it means to be a child's toy. Exclusive clips by way of Cannes, each depicting intimate encounters. Abel Ferrara's Tommaso follows an
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Rushes: Doris Day, Cannes Trailers, Portrait of Joanna Hogg

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSDoris Day. The American actress, singer, and Animal rights activist, Doris Day has died. Anthony Lane provides a tender remembrance at The New Yorker: "There was a depth, despite everything, to her fabled simplicity, and a courage to her lack of complications; even as the world was curdling around her, she insisted on the milk of human kindness." Recommended VIEWINGWith the 2019 Cannes Film Festival having now begun, a slew of trailers has arrived ranging from Ira Sachs collaboration with Isabelle Huppert, Werner Herzog's mysterious Japan set film, to French comedy auteur (and DJ!) Quentin Dupieux's new... horror film?!Rick Alverson's menacing, Jeff Goldblum led pic about a lobotomizing doctor gets its first stirring trailer ahead of a Us release.Recommended READINGJoanna Hogg by Eleanor Taylor for The New York Times.
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Building Agrabah: How Production Designer Gemma Jackson Created a Whole New World for ‘Aladdin’

With Disney’s continuing cycle of live-action remakes of animated classics, the question invariably becomes: Is this really justified? While it’s been very hit and miss, thus far, in the case of “Aladdin,” director Guy Ritchie has made a much more engaging remake than the previous live-action version of a Howard Ashman/Alan Menken musical fantasy, “Beauty and the Beast.”

The secret was providing greater relevance for today while staying true to the spirit of the original — and yet opening it up in a way that plays totally to the strengths of live action. Chief among them was encouraging production designer Gemma Jackson (“King Arthur”) to create “a whole new world” that was colorful and diverse, which allowed Will Smith to be Will Smith as the beloved Genie, and empowered Naomi Scott to be a more politically active and ambitious as Princess Jasmine.

The biggest decision was expanding the
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“My First Studio, Commercially Made Film”: Ryūsuke Hamaguchi on Solaris, Asako I & II and Japanese Film School

When Ryūsuke Hamaguchi’s Happy Hour premiered in 2015, the 317-minute film raised a lot of questions, not least of which: who precisely was Hamaguchi, and what has he been doing for the last decade? There were some unkind trade reviews of his first feature films (Passion and The Depths) but not much else in English to draw upon, and his iMDB resume (including a full feature remake of Solaris!) raised more questions than it answered. Metrograph’s recent retrospective provided some clarity. After his first two features, Hamaguchi collaborated on a trilogy of documentaries collecting testimonies from victims of 2011’s Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, […]
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“My First Studio, Commercially Made Film”: Ryūsuke Hamaguchi on Solaris, Asako I & II and Japanese Film School

When Ryūsuke Hamaguchi’s Happy Hour premiered in 2015, the 317-minute film raised a lot of questions, not least of which: who precisely was Hamaguchi, and what has he been doing for the last decade? There were some unkind trade reviews of his first feature films (Passion and The Depths) but not much else in English to draw upon, and his iMDB resume (including a full feature remake of Solaris!) raised more questions than it answered. Metrograph’s recent retrospective provided some clarity. After his first two features, Hamaguchi collaborated on a trilogy of documentaries collecting testimonies from victims of 2011’s Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Cannes Market Stirs Controversy With Movie Poster of Donald Trump’s Decapitated Head

Cannes Market Stirs Controversy With Movie Poster of Donald Trump’s Decapitated Head
The 2019 Cannes Film Festival market is gaining national attention this year because of a movie poster that features the decapitated head of Donald Trump. The film, a science-fiction B-movie homage entitled “When Women Rule the World,” is the directorial debut of writer-director-producer Sheldon Silverstein. The poster features a woman holding Trump’s head, complete with the president’s trademark red Make America Great Again hat.

According to the official website for “When Women Rule the World,” the film takes place in 2121 after Donald Trump has caused the apocalypse by starting World War III. Trump drove the world into chaos after a disagreement with Russian leader Vladimir Putin over who has the bigger penis.

The official synopsis reads: “Reality-show mogul Michael Bray and his Russian fiancé, Maria Putin — along with Susan Tolby, Michael’s tough associate producer, and Jon Dawson, brilliant nerd and social media guru — are driving to Las Vegas
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Albert Hughes Makes Splashy TV Entry With Ethan Hawke-Led John Brown Series

Albert Hughes Makes Splashy TV Entry With Ethan Hawke-Led John Brown Series
Since Albert and Allen Hughes — known professionally as the Hughes brothers — split up around 2004 to direct solo projects, individual output has been uneven in terms of volume, acclaim and box office. Allen’s highlight was the 2017 HBO documentary series “The Defiant Ones,” about music producers Jimmy Iovine and Dr. Dre. While Albert directed his first solo feature film in 2018, the historical adventure “Alpha.” While the former’s follow-up remains a mystery, the latter will make his first major foray into television, signing up to direct and executive produce Showtime’s limited series based on author James McBride’s 2013 book, “The Good Lord Bird,” replacing Anthony Hemingway.

A winner of the National Book Award for Fiction, the first person narrative follows Henry Shackleford, a mid-19th century slave in Kansas who accidentally encounters abolitionist John Brown and joins his movement. Ethan Hawke, who is also co-writing and executive producing the series,
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‘Tommaso’: Willem Dafoe In A Creative Funk In Abel Ferrara’s Navel-Gazing Self-Portrait [Cannes Review]

Can fiction be a more powerful vehicle to express one’s lived experience than the documentary form? In the late period of his career, “Bad Lieutenant” director Abel Ferrara has become unexpectedly introspective, in part a consequence of his difficulty in financing ambitious projects. “Tommaso“—premiering as a Special Screening at the Cannes Film Festival—is the director’s first “fiction” effort since 2014 but undoubtedly an extension of his nonfiction work in recent years.

Continue reading ‘Tommaso’: Willem Dafoe In A Creative Funk In Abel Ferrara’s Navel-Gazing Self-Portrait [Cannes Review] at The Playlist.
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‘Deadwood’ Review: David Milch’s HBO Movie Is a Bittersweet and Brutally Honest Triumph

‘Deadwood’ Review: David Milch’s HBO Movie Is a Bittersweet and Brutally Honest Triumph
The closing line of David Milch’s “Deadwood” movie is one of the greatest ever written. Part epitaph, part rebuke of that very thought, the ending note to Milch’s long-awaited follow-up to an epic western cut short is every bit as enlivening, powerful, and motherfucking final as fans could want. Of course, the words won’t be spoiled here, but the same encouraging sentiments can be said for the film overall, as a cast emboldened by grand dialogue and towering themes returns for a simple story, beautifully told.

Given the brevity of the film, as well as its unencumbered plotting, here are the few details you need to know before diving in:

The “Deadwood” movie picks up 10 years after the end of Season 3, as the citizens of Deadwood gather to celebrate South Dakota’s statehood. These festivities serve to bring everyone back in one place, and all of the
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Daniel Craig To Undergo Surgery To Repair ‘Bond 25’ Ankle Injury But Production Will Continue

There’s good news and bad news regarding the upcoming “Bond 25.” The bad news is that the ankle injury that Daniel Craig suffered while on the set of the spy film will require surgery. The good news is that production won’t be slowing down.

As mentioned, it was recently reported that Craig hurt his ankle while filming the upcoming “Bond 25.” At the time, not much was known, other than the fact that he was rushed from Jamaica to the Us for further tests.

Continue reading Daniel Craig To Undergo Surgery To Repair ‘Bond 25’ Ankle Injury But Production Will Continue at The Playlist.
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‘Brightburn’ Terrorizes With Gleeful Gore As An Allegory For The Hypocrisy Of The American Way [Review]

Originally announced as an “untitled James Gunn horror project,” shrouded in mystery, and then finding itself caught in the crosshairs of the filmmaker’s controversial firing from the upcoming “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3” by Disney (since re-hired), the dark, deconstructive superhero film, “Brightburn” has been through the wringer on its way to the screen. Actually directed by frequent Gunn family collaborator David Yarovesky (“The Hive”), it’s a shame all this baggage hangs over “Brightburn” because the film is a gem, especially for anyone yearning for a superhero film that gleefully torches the familiar “good versus evil” formula and introduces far more sinister sensibilities.

Continue reading ‘Brightburn’ Terrorizes With Gleeful Gore As An Allegory For The Hypocrisy Of The American Way [Review] at The Playlist.
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How Martin Scorsese Helped Tender Trans Romance ‘Port Authority’ Get to Cannes

How Martin Scorsese Helped Tender Trans Romance ‘Port Authority’ Get to Cannes
In “Port Authority,” a gritty New York-set coming of age drama with a tender romance at its heart, for once it’s not the trans character who is hiding something. Wye (Leyna Bloom) has never made a secret of her gender identity; instead, as she points out to her paramour Paul (Fionn Whitehead), it is he who made an assumption about who she was. “You gotta look around you,” she tells him. The rest of the film, which premiered in Cannes’ Un Certain Regard section to raves, is more interested in what Paul is hiding, and whether he could ever be accepted into Wye’s world of queer balls and familial houses. When she challenges him to name which ball category he would walk, he answers: “White boy realness.”

The phrase is a challenge, both to Paul and the viewer. Ball categories are aspirational and performative by their very nature.
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Olivia Wilde & The Cast Of ‘Booksmart’ On Teen Film Inspiration, Creating Chemistry & More [Interview]

Olivia Wilde has been acting in film and television for over two decades. Each role she embraces, she does so with the dexterity of somebody with experience years beyond what her filmography suggests on paper. And her passion and artistry extend further than acting. Aside from her well-known activism work, Wilde is an acclaimed producer of both topical documentaries (“Fear Us Women“) and indie features (“Meadowland“).

Continue reading Olivia Wilde & The Cast Of ‘Booksmart’ On Teen Film Inspiration, Creating Chemistry & More [Interview] at The Playlist.
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Daniel Craig to Undergo Ankle Surgery After Bond 25 Set Injury, Film’s Release Date Not Changing

Daniel Craig to Undergo Ankle Surgery After Bond 25 Set Injury, Film’s Release Date Not Changing
James Bond is taking a break from the production of Bond 25. Per the official 007 Twitter account, actor Daniel Craig will be undergoing minor ankle surgery after suffering an injury on the set of the new James Bond movie. Craig was filming with director Cary Fukunaga in Jamaica when the accident happened. The surgery will not stop production, even though Craig will head to rehab for two weeks after the operation.

The official James Bond social media account wrote in a statement: “Daniel Craig will be undergoing minor ankle surgery resulting from an injury sustained during filming in Jamaica. Production will continue whilst Craig is rehabilitating for two weeks post-surgery. The film remains on track for the same release date in April 2020.”

In addition to Craig, Bond 25 is seeing the returns of franchise players Naomi Harris, Ralph Fiennes, Ben Whishaw, Jeffrey Wright, Rory Kinnear, and Lea Seydoux. Rami Malek has
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Oh Mercy!’ Review: Leá Seydoux Is Totally Wasted in Arnaud Desplechin’s Flat Procedural

‘Oh Mercy!’ Review: Leá Seydoux Is Totally Wasted in Arnaud Desplechin’s Flat Procedural
A ponderous true-crime procedural about a murder in France’s poorest commune, Arnaud Desplechin’s mostly lifeless but peripherally compelling “Oh Mercy!” finds the “My Golden Years” auteur returning to his birthplace to tell a story about a place that few people got to choose, and even fewer get to leave. If the film is a literal homecoming, however, it’s also a striking figurative departure for a filmmaker best known (and most beloved) for intricate, frazzled, and hyper-loquacious comedic dramas like “Kings and Queen” and “A Christmas Tale.” In that sense, this frigid misfire is most readily comparable to Hirokazu Kore-eda’s “The Third Murder,” another flat genre flirtation from an otherwise reliable master.

Based on a killing that occurred in May of 2002, “Oh Mercy!” unfolds like an especially dull episode of “Law & Order: Roubaix.” The film begins on Christmas — not that the script Desplechin co-wrote with Léa Mysius
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‘Room 104’: Brian Tyree Henry Breaks Down His ‘Incredibly Terrifying’ Musical Episode

‘Room 104’: Brian Tyree Henry Breaks Down His ‘Incredibly Terrifying’ Musical Episode
[The following article contains spoilers for “Room 104” Season 2, Episode 6, “Arnold.”]

Between all the flashing lights, choreographed dances, and live performances, the crux of “Arnold” — Brian Tyree Henry’s musical episode of “Room 104” — came down to a man staring at his phone.

“At the core of it, we always zeroed in on this moment when he looks at his phone and realizes what the word ‘falling’ meant,” writer and director Julian Wass told IndieWire. “It’s this fatalistic view of ‘falling’ — of course it wasn’t falling in love, it was falling off a building.”

“Falling” is the third word uttered by Arnold (Henry) as he stumbles, wet and confused, out of Room 104’s bathroom. He doesn’t know where he is, why he’s there, or how he ended up in a hotel, but Arnold starts singing “the yellow jacket… Kiki Alvarez… falling” — and he starts to remember more.

“That’s sort of the beginning of the memory, and each
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‘Marianne & Leonard: Words Of Love’ Trailer: New Doc Explores Leonard Cohen’s Beautiful, Tragic Love Affair With His Muse

The love life of an artist is always a bit troubled. By their very nature, successful artists, no matter the medium, don’t make for the best partners. And in the case of Leonard Cohen and Marianne Ihlen, that is most definitely the case. In the new documentary, which recently premiered at Sundance, “Marianne & Leonard: Words of Love,” we learn how a love affair between a poet/songwriter and his muse can be a beautiful, but tragic, thing.

Continue reading ‘Marianne & Leonard: Words Of Love’ Trailer: New Doc Explores Leonard Cohen’s Beautiful, Tragic Love Affair With His Muse at The Playlist.
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29 Living Actors Who Worked With Alfred Hitchcock

29 Living Actors Who Worked With Alfred Hitchcock
Doris Day, who died May 13 at 97, had an iconic career as an actress and singer (and in retirement as an animal activist). The high points of her film career were many, but nearly anyone assessing her performances would include Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Man Who Knew Too Much,” released 63 years ago.

Her death reduces the dwindling number of actors whom Hitchcock directed on film. We found 18 of his 53 features which have cast members still with us. The number of actors we found — currently ranging in age from 63 -104 — comes to 29. Here are these extraordinary performers who provide a crucial living link to film history.
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Cannes Director Thierry Fremaux Answers the Biggest Questions About This Year’s Festival

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Cannes Director Thierry Fremaux Answers the Biggest Questions About This Year’s Festival
The Cannes Film Festival always invites scrutiny from every side of the industry, from distributors and sales agents to critics and journalists. The conversations surrounding Cannes have only intensified in recent years, with topics surrounding the evolution of the business and the advent of streaming platform sharing space with complaints about the diversity of the festival lineup. However, the festival doesn’t avoid these far-reaching issues. While Cannes director Thierry Frémaux spoke to IndieWire ahead of this year’s festival about this year’s festival, the narrative of the festival changes over the course of its 10 days, so Frémaux had more to say.

He made a surprise appearance at the American Pavilion this week to join IndieWire’s Eric Kohn and Anne Thompson for a live recording of Screen Talk, where he delved into many potent topics about the 2019 festival. Among the issues Frémaux addressed: debates about the lack of gender parity in the program,
See full article at Indiewire »
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