Indie News

After ‘Avengers: Endgame,’ What Marvel Cinematic Universe Movies Might We Expect Next?

After ‘Avengers: Endgame,’ What Marvel Cinematic Universe Movies Might We Expect Next?
[Editor’s note: Some mild spoilers ahead for “Avengers: Endgame.”]

By the end of Anthony and Joe Russo’s “Avengers: Infinity War,” the Marvel Cinematic Universe was forever altered, at least until this month’s “Avengers: Endgame,” which promises to provide a satisfying conclusion to both the world-changing “snap” that killed off half the known universe and end the franchise’s so-called Infinity Saga. While both Disney and Marvel have remained predictably mum on what’s to come for the McU after the Avengers-centric series presumably concludes, they’ve been unable to avoid setting aside a slew of dates for upcoming features, along with lining up new titles, directors, and casts to kit them out.

Over the coming years, Marvel and Disney have already staked out a number of future release dates for new McU movies, including eight locked-in dates that run from 2020 until 2022 — only one of these, “Spider-Man: Far From Home,” is confirmed for one of these dates.
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Leonardo DiCaprio & Guillermo Del Toro To Team Up For ‘Nightmare Alley’

After taking some time off, it would appear that Oscar-winning filmmaker Guillermo del Toro has a jam-packed slate of projects on the horizon. He already put on his producer’s cap for the upcoming film “Antlers.” In addition, he’s signed on to direct a stop-motion animated version of “Pinocchio” for Netflix. But on the live-action front, it seems as if del Toro has decided on which project to work on next and he’s bringing along Leonardo DiCaprio to star.

Continue reading Leonardo DiCaprio & Guillermo Del Toro To Team Up For ‘Nightmare Alley’ at The Playlist.
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A Straub-Huillet Companion: "Chronicle of Anna Magdalena Bach"

  • MUBI
A Straub-Huillet Companion is a series of short essays on the films of Jean-Marie traub and Danièle Huillet, subject of a Mubi retrospective. Straub-Huillet's Chronicle of Anna Magdalena Bach (1968) is showing on Mubi from April 15 – May 14, 2019.When he met an eighteen-year-old Danièle Huillet in 1954, Jean-Marie Straub, also a mere twenty-one years of age, already had the project that would become Chronicle of Anna Magdalena Bach (1968) in mind, drawing inspiration from a fictional biography of Frau Bach by Esther Meynell; he immediately asked Huillet to collaborate with him on the script. Which is to say that the pair intended what ultimately became their third film—after the short Machorka-Muff (1963) and the mid-length Not Reconciled (1965)—to serve as a true introduction to their practice. All that is Straub-Huillet is there in Bach: The curious vitality of technically unaffected performers. The reverence for a text’s essence. The unpredictable, stop-start rhythm of the montage,
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‘Avengers: Endgame’ Will Break Box-Office Records, and That’s Bad for Business

Is Marvel on Team Avengers, or Team Thanos? The question verges on apostasy, but it has to be asked when faced with the projected opening for “Avengers: Endgame.” Not only is it expected to beat the $257 million (adjusted) opening for “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” (2015), but domestic projections are a staggering $300 million (or higher!) as some theaters run round-the-clock shows. However, it doesn’t prove that exhibitors are no longer under siege; it’s more like a tsunami that washes away enemy troops… and most of the city along with it.

Here’s why.

It Will Only Make a Dent in the Box Office

Through Monday, 2019 total domestic box office totals about a little over $2.9 billion. Through the same date last year, it was $3.5 billion. Certainly, this weekend will represent an improvement — but only a slight one. Led by “Infinity War,” the same weekend last year grossed $314 million, for one
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Oscars Goes Status Quo With New ‘Netflix Rule’ But Makes Other Changes

The Academy’s Board of Governors held its first formal meeting following the 91st Oscars and the much ballyhooed “Netflix vs. Speilberg” showdown did not come to pass. Not only was the influential filmmaker never expected to be at the function, but there was also a conveniently timed New York Times story published on the same day that effectively spun that his concerns over streaming services’ films and their Oscar qualifications were grossly exaggerated.

Continue reading Oscars Goes Status Quo With New ‘Netflix Rule’ But Makes Other Changes at The Playlist.
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Academy Board of Governors Changes Rules for 92nd Oscars — Without Spielberg

No more Spielberg vs. Netflix headlines. The filmmaker and Academy governor skipped this year’s annual rules meeting on April 23. He may have recognized that the possible rule change requiring a longer exclusive run would not fly. He’s changed his tune, it seems.

As expected, the Academy’s Board of Governors voted to maintain the 2012 status quo for Rule Two, Eligibility for the 92nd Oscars. To be eligible for awards consideration, a film must have a minimum seven-day theatrical run in a Los Angeles County commercial theater, with at least three screenings per day for paid admission. Motion pictures released in nontheatrical media on or after the first day of their Los Angeles County theatrical qualifying run remain eligible.

“We support the theatrical experience as integral to the art of motion pictures, and this weighed heavily in our discussions,” stated Academy President John Bailey. “Our rules currently require theatrical exhibition,
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George R.R. Martin Wishes ‘Game of Thrones’ Aired ‘A Few More Seasons’ Before Ending TV Run

HBO’s “Game of Thrones” only has four episodes left before it says goodbye to television for good, and “Thrones” author George R.R. Martin isn’t exactly pleased with that fact. In a new interview with Rolling Stone, Martin explained that he’s a bit wistful about the fantasy series coming to an end and shared that he would have preferred the series run longer than just eight seasons.

“It’s complex and I’m a little sad, actually,” Martin said when asked how he’s feeling about the end of the “Thrones” television series. “I wish we had a few more seasons. But I understand. [Showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss] are gonna go on to do other things, and I’m sure some of the actors were signed up for like seven or eight years, and they would like to go on and take other roles. All of that is fair.
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‘Avengers: Endgame’: How a Six-Year Journey to Decide Who Lives and Who Dies Ended With a Party

‘Avengers: Endgame’: How a Six-Year Journey to Decide Who Lives and Who Dies Ended With a Party
At the April 22 “Avengers: Endgame” premiere at the massive Los Angeles Convention Center, Disney chairman and CEO Bob Iger stood in front of a 70-foot screen and before 2,000 people wedged into narrow stadium seats as he announced that they were here to celebrate the finale of the “Avengers” branch of the McU universe. Not that anyone needed the reminder: “Avengers” fever has captured the internet, the media, and every imaginable marketing platform. However, he may as well have been cueing the audience to notice something even larger than the Marvel superheroes: This premiere represented not only the state of its studio, but of the industry itself.

It’s more than a blockbuster; it represents the possibility, and the paradigm, of a billion-dollar opening weekend. It comes at a time when the box office is struggling from week to week, but begs the question of whether a success of this size
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‘Cobra Kai’ Creators Tease a New Arena for the ‘Explosiveness’ of Action in Season 2

‘Cobra Kai’ Creators Tease a New Arena for the ‘Explosiveness’ of Action in Season 2
Forget “Game of Thrones” and “Avengers.” When “Cobra Kai” debuts its second season on Wednesday, April 24, it’s time for war. YouTube Premium’s “Karate Kid” sequel series picks up where it left off with Daniel Larusso (Ralph Macchio) opening his own dojo, Miyagi-Do Karate, in the wake of his rival Johnny Lawrence’s (William Zabka) Cobra Kai dojo winning the All Valley Karate Tournament.

“We always loved the idea of these two rival dojos competing for the soul of the Valley,” said Hayden Schlossberg, who co-created the series alongside Josh Heald and Jon Hurwitz. “There was something that was fun about that for us, but it also provided the types of stakes that could lead to awesome scenes. Thematically, this season is about showing mercy.”

In Season 1, successful auto dealer Daniel comes out of karate retirement when Johnny reopens the Cobra Kai dojo to teach kids who have been bullied to fight back.
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‘Avengers: Endgame’ Review: A Messy Love Letter to the Biggest Movie Franchise of the Century

‘Avengers: Endgame’ Review: A Messy Love Letter to the Biggest Movie Franchise of the Century
By assembling a decade of superhero narratives into the spectacular package that was “Avengers: Infinity War,” Marvel Studios pulled off the most dramatic blockbuster gamble of all time. Directors Anthony and Joe Russo imported the complex world-building approach from generations of Marvel Comics into a cinematic whole, creating a noisy mishmash of beloved characters and CGI-laced showdowns. It was a unique negotiation between spectacle and character, more impressive than anyone could have anticipated. But it would have been little more than a costly collage without the most dramatic cliffhanger in modern history, and “Avengers: Endgame” strains from contending with the fallout of that twist.

Few spoilers follow here, though sensitive viewers may consider even general observations as such. Suffice to say, “Endgame” delivers the payoff countless fans hoped for, even as it struggles to fuse that commercial mandate into a gratifying whole. There’s much to enjoy about this mishmash
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‘Avengers: Endgame’ Is The Marvel-iest Of Marvel Movies In The Most Glorious & Frustrating Ways [Review]

This review is a spoiler-free piece that will not reveal any of the surprises of “Avengers: Endgame.”

Judging by the fact that “Avengers: Infinity War” made over $2 billion at the box office last year, it’s fair to say everyone knows that the end of the film left audiences with their jaws on the floor. The Mad Titan Thanos snapped his fingers and used the Infinity Gauntlet to wipe out half of all living creatures in the universe, including many of your favorite heroes.

Continue reading ‘Avengers: Endgame’ Is The Marvel-iest Of Marvel Movies In The Most Glorious & Frustrating Ways [Review] at The Playlist.
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How the Composer of ‘Shazam!’ Could be the Heir to Zimmer and Williams

How the Composer of ‘Shazam!’ Could be the Heir to Zimmer and Williams
After the horror thrills of “Lights Out” and “Annabelle: Creation,” director David Sandberg and composer Benjamin Wallfisch shifted tone with the light-hearted adventure of “Shazam!,” the box office hit starring Zachary Levi as DC’s iconic child-man superhero.

“David and I started discussing the score several months before shooting began,” said Wallfisch (who has been busy lately scoring “Hellboy” and Nat Geo’s “Hostile Planet”), “and we just found ourselves geeking out over our shared love of the classic superhero and adventure/fantasy scores that were being written in the ’70s and ’80s, those huge thematic, orchestral scores that totally wore their heart on their sleeve and were unabashedly emotive and motivic.”

Naturally, Sandberg wanted to go with a “classic” sound for their score, since Shazam hails from the Golden Age of superhero comics in the ’40s. And, of course, they were all in for recording the score in London
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Leonardo DiCaprio Eyes Lead Role in Guillermo del Toro’s ‘Nightmare Alley’

Leonardo DiCaprio Eyes Lead Role in Guillermo del Toro’s ‘Nightmare Alley’
Leonardo DiCaprio and Guillermo del Toro are nearing a collaboration on “Nightmare Alley,” the director’s adaptation of William Lindsay Gresham’s 1946 novel of the same name. Del Toro is developing “Nightmare Alley” at Fox Searchlight, the studio that handled the production and distribution of his Oscar-winner “The Shape of Water.” As first reported by Variety, DiCaprio has entered final negotiations to star in the lead role of mentalist and con artist Stanton “Stan” Carlisle. Tyrone Power played the character in the 1947 film adaptation, directed by Edmund Goulding and released by 20th Century Fox.

Del Toro stepped back from filmmaking after “The Shape of Water” won four Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director. The filmmaker followed-up the Oscar wins by deciding to produce projects such as André Øvredal’s “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark” (in theaters August 9) and Scott Cooper’s “Antlers,” also produced by Fox Searchlight.
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Doug Liman’s $100M ‘Chaos Walking’ Undergoes Reshoots After First Cut Deemed ‘Unreleasable’ — Report

Doug Liman’s $100M ‘Chaos Walking’ Undergoes Reshoots After First Cut Deemed ‘Unreleasable’ — Report
When Lionsgate picked up the distribution rights to Patrick Ness’ “Chaos Walking” trilogy in 2011, it seemed that the home of such blockbuster adaptations as “The Twilight Saga” and “The Hunger Games” was lining up their next Ya-leaning smash hit. That market has, of course, changed in the intervening years — by the time the fourth film in the Jennifer Lawrence-starring “Hunger Games” series ended, each film’s box office had declined precipitously from the previous film; Lionsgate and Summit didn’t even make a final film in the similar “Divergent” series — and few studios are attempting the same multi-film treatment that ruled the box office just a decade ago.

It didn’t help that with “Chaos Walking” the film went through a few iterations on its way to the big screen, the kind that would slow down any film, let alone one arriving a touch too late. Robert Zemeckis was
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During Peak TV, Are Shorter Episode Runtimes Better? – IndieWire Critics Survey

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday.

This week’s question: Are shorter runtimes better in the era of Peak TV?

Kaitlin Thomas (@thekaitling), TVGuide.com

I think everyone, whether they cover television as their job or not, can agree that shorter runtimes are better (the same can be said for shorter seasons). It is partly about the sheer amount of television vying for our attention at all times – it’s easier to watch more television if you’re not stuck watching episodes that top out at an hour or more all the time – but it’s also because a lot of television is unnecessary filler. “13 Reasons Why” not only had too many episodes, but it had too many episodes that went on and on and on without adding anything meaningful to the narrative. If there was ever a
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‘The Lion King’ Is Not a Live-Action Movie, But Will Likely Compete as One at 2020 Oscars

‘The Lion King’ Is Not a Live-Action Movie, But Will Likely Compete as One at 2020 Oscars
Jon Favreau’s upcoming “The Lion King” is not a live-action movie, but don’t expect to see the upcoming remake of Disney’s 1994 classic in the 2020 Oscar race for Best Animated Feature. IndieWire caught up with the director at the “Avengers: Endgame” world premiere where he revealed there is only one live-action shot in the entirety of his “The Lion King” remake. Favreau snuck in the shot just to see whether or not viewers will be able to tell the difference between live-action and the movie’s photorealistic visual effects.

Favreau has worked predominantly with CGI animation before on “The Jungle Book,” his 2016 family tentpole that grossed $966 million worldwide and won the Oscar for Best Visual Effects. “The Jungle Book” had one major live-action component thanks to child actor Neel Sethi, but “The Lion King” is completely animated. Motion capture was not used on “Lion King.” The actors who
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David Milch Reveals Alzheimer’s Diagnosis As He Preps The Release Of “Deadwood: The Movie’

This year should be a time of triumph for writer David Milch. The man behind HBO’s underrated “Deadwood,” which found itself canceled after only 3 seasons (after being promised 4), is finally bringing fans what they’ve been anxiously awaiting — closure. That closure comes in the form of the long-awaited “Deadwood: The Movie,” which is set to premiere at the end of May on HBO.

Continue reading David Milch Reveals Alzheimer’s Diagnosis As He Preps The Release Of “Deadwood: The Movie’ at The Playlist.
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How the Marvel Cinematic Universe Changed Hollywood’s Concept of an Action Director

Thirteen years ago this week, Marvel announced that Jon Favreau would develop and direct “Iron Man.” The film would be the first of what we would come to know as the Marvel Cinematic Universe, a remarkable 23-film series that has become the dominant financial force in studio filmmaking.

A scan of the top-grossing action franchises from 2004-2007 reveals how Hollywood’s concept of a big-budget tentpole director has changed. “Spider-Man” rebooted under the swooping cartoon style of Sam Raimi. “Transformers” was defined by the clashing metallic ballet of a Michael Bay film. Gore Verbinski’s playful precision gave “Pirates of the Caribbean” its distinctive verve. And when the Jason Bourne franchise took a heady, gritty turn under Paul Greengrass, it was a shift defined by the director’s unique handheld approach to action.

You could watch 30 seconds of an action scene from any of these films and identify the filmmakers’ fingerprints.
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John Boyega Thinks ‘Rise Of Skywalker’ Will Feature His Last Appearance In A ‘Star Wars’ Film

If you watched the “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker” panel from the recent Star Wars Celebration, you probably know that Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy and director J.J. Abrams are saying that the upcoming film is the true end to the Skywalker Saga. However, considering there are plenty of characters that were introduced in 2015’s ‘The Force Awakens,’ and in the subsequent films, that haven’t had multiple films to flesh out their stories, there has always been the speculation that Lucasfilm could continue the story with some of those characters.

Continue reading John Boyega Thinks ‘Rise Of Skywalker’ Will Feature His Last Appearance In A ‘Star Wars’ Film at The Playlist.
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‘Body at Brighton Rock’ Review: A Survival Horror Movie with the Fun Heart of an ’80s Slasher

‘Body at Brighton Rock’ Review: A Survival Horror Movie with the Fun Heart of an ’80s Slasher
At a time when so many low-budget indies seem resigned to streaming, Roxanne Benjamin’s fun and forgettable “Body at Brighton Rock” feels ready-made for a Friday night on your couch. It’s a total slumber party of a movie, told with plenty of skill, even more potential, and an utter lack of preciousness from its delightful opening moments to its enjoyable shrug of a last-minute twist. A large part of that appeal is owed to the throwback vibe of a movie that eschews straightforward nostalgia in favor of a subdermal longing for a more innocent time. Benjamin is a rising star with deep roots in the horror world (previous credits include producing “V/H/S” and directing segments in anthology offerings “Southbound” and “Xx”), but even her bright future is tied to the past (upcoming projects include a remake of the 1984 cult classic “Night of the Comet”).

Body at Brighton Rock
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