Krisha and The Art of Filming Self-Destruction

A movie that approaches and separates itself from a familiar storyline.

Self-destruction has been a popular cinematic theme since the silent era. One of the first examples being Charlie Chaplin’s The Cure from 1917, a film about a drunk who goes to a spa hoping to cure his addiction. Almost 100 years later, the most recent contribution to this popular narrative is Krisha, Trey Edward Shults’s first feature film. The film stems from Shults’s short film released the year prior titled Krisha, and, spanning over a single day, tells the story of a woman returning home after having disappeared for a number of years.

Krisha isn’t the first film to screen addiction, as stated above. To name a few movies of this genre: Miles Ahead (2016), Trainwreck (2015), Thanks for Sharing (2012), Shame (2011), Requiem for a Dream (2000), Man With a Golden Arm (1955), The Lost Weekend (1945), and Sadie McKee (1934). Yet since its festival circuit and (limited) release as of
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