‘Minamata’ Review: Johnny Depp’s Gonzo Performance Can’t Rescue an Overzealous Biopic

‘Minamata’ Review: Johnny Depp’s Gonzo Performance Can’t Rescue an Overzealous Biopic
Some stories of real-life heroism beg to be told, while films like “Minamata” fall victim to good intentions. Director Andrew Levitas’ mopey drama recounts war photographer W. Eugene Smith’s seminal expose of mercury poisoning in the eponymous Japanese fishing village, and certainly that 1972 photo essay deserves a feature-length salute.

However, Here and there, “Minamata” tells a bracing story of corporate malfeasance and bracing advocacy for the underclass, but even the occasional poignant observation can’t salvage a movie trying this hard to tug every heartstring at its disposal.

The tale of Smith’s final, crowning achievement in a storied career holds plenty of appeal in the opening act. New York, 1971: Smith’s already out of the game. Once a celebrated WWII photographer, he’s devolved into a hard-drinking cyclone of resentment and self-pity. Estranged from his adult kids and strapped for cash, he begs Life magazine editor Bob
See full article at Indiewire »

Similar News


Recently Viewed