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Manhattan Parade (1931)

TV-G | | Comedy, Musical | 10 January 1932 (USA)
The fortunes of a Broadway costume company rise and fall depending on who is running it, and whether its clients' shows succeed or not.

Director:

Lloyd Bacon

Writers:

Samuel Shipman (based on a play by), Robert Lord (adaptation) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Winnie Lightner ... Doris Roberts
Charles Butterworth ... Herbert T. Herbert
Joe Smith Joe Smith ... Lou Delman: of the Avon Comedy Four (as Smith)
Charles Dale Charles Dale ... Jake Delman: of the Avon Comedy Four (as Dale)
Dickie Moore ... Junior Roberts
Bobby Watson ... Paisley
Frank Conroy ... Bill Brighton
Walter Miller ... John Roberts
Mae Madison ... Woman in Charge of Fitting
Polly Walters ... Telephone Girl
Luis Alberni ... Vassily Vassiloff
Greta Granstedt ... Charlotte Evans
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Storyline

The John Roberts Costume Company is being run super-efficiently by Doris Roberts, but her husband demands that she give up her position to stay at home with their young son. Without her wheeling and dealing skills the company starts to lose money and when John leaves for Europe on a tryst, Doris returns to save the firm. Hooking up with an obviously disturbed producer and a pair of theatrical backers, the costume company seems to be on the road to riches again when John returns and wants his share of the profits. Written by Ron Kerrigan <mvg@whidbey.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Musical

Certificate:

TV-G
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

10 January 1932 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Warner Bros. See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(Turner library print)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Black and White (TV prints)| Color (2-Strip Technicolor) (original release)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Although it was filmed in 2-strip Technicolor, 35MM surviving material is in black & white, but UCLA holdings include a 16MM color print. Two songs by Harold Arlen and Ted Koehler, "I Love a Parade" and "Temporarily Blue," were cut before release, although "I Love A Parade" is heard over the opening and closing credits. "I'm Happy When You're Jealous" by Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby was also cut before release. See more »

Quotes

Frank Harriman: Possibly you boys don't know what I've been up against this year. Why, do you know I've had to have the bottom of my yacht scraped - twice?
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Soundtracks

Temporarily Blue
Music by Harold Arlen
Lyrics by Ted Koehler
See more »

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User Reviews

 
A Footnote in Gay Film History
21 June 2007 | by dglinkSee all my reviews

More historical curiosity that entertainment, "Manhattan Parade" is an early sound effort that has dated badly. Perhaps hysterically funny in 1932, the film's static shooting technique only emphasizes the flatness of the jokes. A recurring pair of theatrical producers, played by the comedy team of Smith and Dale, overstays their welcome with a series of tiresome exchanges. Abbott and Costello they are not. The story, which originally had songs, revolves around a theatrical costume company, whose successful president is played by Winnie Lightner. However, Lightner surrenders her feminist credentials early on when she meekly submits to her husband's demands that he run the company and she stay home where she belongs and care for their young son. Needless to say, the philandering husband is no better at business than he is at marriage, and the company falls into debt.

Were it not for Bobby Watson, who plays a designer named Paisley, "Manhattan Parade" would rarely be unwound from its reels. However, Watson's limp wristed character is yet another prime example of gay stereotyping in early Hollywood. His threats to slap his foes or quit and stay home to decorate his apartment are evidently accepted by the other characters as quite normal for a sissy. Whining about fabric that should be maroon rather than cerise, Watson underscores filmdom's concept that gays are silly, shallow freaks with no values of consequence in their lives. While not as offensive as some gay characterizations, Paisley, nevertheless, will irritate viewers who are sensitive to negative stereotypes. Interestingly, the film also features two other male characters, a shy, daffy researcher and an effete, snobbish actor, whose sexuality could also be questioned. The concept of the theatrical world as a haven for gays had already taken root.

Unfortunately, there is little to recommend in "Manhattan Parade" other than its status as a footnote in gay film history. The performances are competent, although Dickie Moore is a scene-stealer as Lightner's son, and Lloyd Bacon's direction is perfunctory given the restraints of the period. This short comedy will seem to drag on humorlessly for hours to viewers who are not dedicated film historians.


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