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The Miracle Woman (1931) Poster

Trivia

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In a pure "pre-code" moment, we see Sister Fallon's chauffeur, Lou, give Horsby "the finger" (out of Horsby's sight) immediately after Horsby warns him about what he must do to keep his job. This scene surely would have been nixed by the Hays Office had the movie been made after 1934.
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Barbara Stanwyck had only one day of rest between the completion of this movie and the first day's shooting of Night Nurse (1931).
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The photograph of Florence's father appears to be that of Paul Weigel.
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The character of Florence Fallon was largely based on popular evangelist preacher Aimee Semple McPherson. Some people nicknamed her "The Miracle Woman" because of her supposed healing powers, but others derided her as a fraud and con artist, saying she never "cured" anyone and was just using the pulpit to make money.
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The play, "Bless You Sister" by John Meehan & Robert Riskin opened in New York on 26 December 1927 and closed in January 1928 after 28 performances. The opening night cast included George Alison, Robert Ames, Charles Bickford, Alice Brady, Dennis Gurney and George Lessey.
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The character Florence Fallon was named Mary MacDonald in the original play.
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This film has a 100% rating on Rotten Tomatoes based on 7 critic reviews.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

This film was made before the days of process screen photography, so few special effects were employed. In a testament to the actors' bravery and dedication to their craft, David Manners recalled that he and Barbara Stanwyck had to work near live lions, separated only by invisible netting. The actor said: "I could smell their breath". Similarly, during the climactic fire scene, Stanwyck had to stand amid real blazing fires, swirling smoke, and falling timbers.
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