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Romeo and Juliet (1936) Poster

Quotes

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Benvolio - Nephew to Montgue and Friend to Romeo: Part fools!

[Benvolio grabs his sword and walks in the fight. The soldiers in the streets continue to sword fight each others]

Benvolio - Nephew to Montgue and Friend to Romeo: Put up your swords! Put up your swords!

[Benvolio breaks up the fight and some soldiers stops fighting. Tybalt shows up]

Tybalt - Nephew to Lady Capulet: What, art thou drawn among these heartless hinds? Turn thee, Benvolio, look upon thy death!

Benvolio - Nephew to Montgue and Friend to Romeo: I do but keep the peace. Put up thy sword. Or manage it to part these men with me.

[Tybalt walks right up to Benvolio while holding his sword and talks right at his face]

Tybalt - Nephew to Lady Capulet: What, drawn, and talk of peace! I hate the word, As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee: Have at thee, coward!

[Tybalt fights against Benvolio in a duel. The women scream. The soldiers continue to fight until Prince Escalus and his guards on horses come into the streets and the fighting stops]

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Escalus - Prince of Verona: Rebellious subjects, enemies to peace.

[Prince Escalus waits until all the soldiers stop fighting in the streets]

Escalus - Prince of Verona: Will they not hear? What, ho! Ye men! You beasts! On pain of torture, Throw your mistempered weapons to the ground. And hear the sentence of your moved prince. Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word, By thee, old Capulet, and Montague, Have thrice disturbed the quiet of our streets, If ever you disturb our streets again, Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace. For this time, all the rest depart away. You Capulet, shall go along with me. And, Montague, come you this afternoon. To know our further pleasure in this case, Once more, on pain of death, all men depart.

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[first lines]

Narrator: Two households, both alike in dignity, In fair Verona, where we lay our scene, From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean. From forth the fatal loins of these two foes A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life.

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Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: I see Queen Mab hath been with you. She is the fairies' midwife, and she comes, In shape no bigger than an agate stone, On the forefinger of an alderman, Drawn with a team of little atomi, Over men's noses as they lie asleep. Her wagon spokes made of long spinners' legs, The cover of the wings of grasshoppers, Her traces of the smallest spider's web, Her collars of the moonshine's watery beams, Her whip of cricket's bone, the lash of film, Her wagoner a small gray-coated gnat, Not half so big as a round little worm, Pricked from the lazy finger of a maid. Her chariot is an empty hazelnut, Made by the joiner squirrel or old grub, Time out o' mind the fairies' coachmakers. And in this state she gallops night by night, Through lovers' brains, and then they dream of love; On courtiers' knees, who dream on curtsies straight; O'er lawyers' fingers, who straight dream on fees; O'er ladies' lips, who straight on kisses dream, Sometime she gallops o'er a courtier's nose, And then dreams he of smelling out a suit. And sometime comes she with a tithe-pig's tail, Tickling a parson's nose as he lies asleep, Then he dreams of another benefice. Sometime she driveth o'er a soldier's neck, And then dreams he of cutting foreign throats, Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades, Of healths five fathom deep, and then anon, Drums in his ear, at which he starts and wakes, And being thus frighted swears a prayer or two, And sleeps again. This is that very Mab, This is she...

Romeo - Son to Montague: Peace, peace, Mercutio, peace! Thou talk'st of nothing.

Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: True, I talk of dreams, Which are the children of an idle brain, Begot of nothing but vain fantasy, Which is as thin of substance as the air, And more inconstant than the wind.

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Romeo - Son to Montague: If I profane with my unworthiest hand, This holy shrine, the gentle find is this: My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand, To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.

Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much, For saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do touch, And palm to palm is holy palmers' kiss.

Romeo - Son to Montague: Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too?

Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer.

Romeo - Son to Montague: O, then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do. They pray; grant thou, lest faith turn to despair.

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Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: My only love sprung from my only hate!

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Juliet: O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo? Deny thy father and refuse thy name. Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love, And I'll no longer be a Capulet.

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Samson - Servant of the House of Capulet: [Samson bites his thumb at Abraham and spits on the ground] I strike quickly being moved, than a dog of the house of Montague, moves me.

Abraham - Servant of the House of Montague: [the Montages walk behind Samson and Abraham puts his hand on his shoulder] Do you bite your thumb at us sir?

Samson - Servant of the House of Capulet: I do bite my thumb sir.

Abraham - Servant of the House of Montague: Do you bite your thumb at us sir?

Samson - Servant of the House of Capulet: Is the law on our side if I say aye?

Gregory - Servant of the House of Capulet: No.

Samson - Servant of the House of Capulet: No sir I do not bite my thumb at you sir, but I do bite my thumb sir.

[the men laugh and walks away, Samson and Gregory follows Abraham and walks up to him]

Samson - Servant of the House of Capulet: Do you quarrel sir?

Abraham - Servant of the House of Montague: Quarrel sir. No sir.

Samson - Servant of the House of Capulet: If you do sir, then I am for you. I serve as good a man as you.

Abraham - Servant of the House of Montague: No better, say that else.

Samson - Servant of the House of Capulet: Yes better!

Abraham - Servant of the House of Montague: You lie!

Samson - Servant of the House of Capulet: Draw if you be men!

[Then the Capulets and Montagues pull out their swords and they fight each other with swords in the streets. The women scream as the men are getting stabbed by swords]

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Tybalt - Nephew to Lady Capulet: What, drawn, and talk of peace? I hate the word, As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee. Have at thee, coward!

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Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: Gentle Romeo, we must have you dance.

Romeo - Son to Montague: Not I, believe me. You have dancing shoes, With nimble soles. I have a soul of lead, So stakes me to the ground I cannot move.

Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: You are a lover. Borrow Cupid's wings, And soar with them above a common bound.

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Romeo - Son to Montague: My mind misgives, Some consequence yet hanging in the stars, Shall bitterly begin his fearful date, With this night's revels. But he that hath the steerage of my course. Direct my sail. On, lusty gentlemen!

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Romeo - Son to Montague: Oh, she doth teach the torches to burn bright! It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night, Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear,

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Romeo - Son to Montague: [after their first kiss] Thus from my lips, by thine, my sin is purged.

Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: Then have my lips the sin that they have took?

Romeo - Son to Montague: Sin from thy lips? O trespass sweetly urged!

[whispers]

Romeo - Son to Montague: Give me my sin again.

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Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: Romeo! Humors, madman, passion, lover! Appear thou in the likeness of a sigh! Speak but one rhyme, and I am satisfied. Cry but "Ay me!" Pronounce but "love" and "dove." He heareth not, he stirreth not, he moveth not. The ape is dead, and I must conjure him.- I conjure thee by Rosaline's bright eyes, By her high forehead and her scarlet lip, By her fine foot, straight leg, and quivering thigh, And the demesnes that there adjacent lie, That in thy likeness thou appear to us.

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Romeo - Son to Montague: But soft! What light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. It is my lady. Oh, it is my love. Oh, that she knew she were! See how she leans her cheek upon her hand. Oh, that I were a glove upon that hand, That I might touch that cheek!

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Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: 'Tis but thy name that is my enemy. What's in a name? That which we call a rose, By any other word would smell as sweet.

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Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: My ears have not yet drunk a hundred words, Of that tongue's uttering, yet I know the sound. Art thou not Romeo, and a Montague?

Romeo - Son to Montague: Neither, fair maid, if either thee dislike.

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Romeo - Son to Montague: With love's light wings did I o'erperch these walls, For stony limits cannot hold love out, And what love can do, that dares love attempt.

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Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: O, swear not by the moon, th' inconstant moon, That monthly changes in her circle orb, Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.

Romeo - Son to Montague: What shall I swear by?

Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: Do not swear at all. Or, if thou wilt, swear by thy gracious self, Which is the god of my idolatry.

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Romeo - Son to Montague: O, wilt thou leave me so unsatisfied?

Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: What satisfaction canst thou have tonight?

Romeo - Son to Montague: Th' exchange of thy love's faithful vow for mine.

Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: I gave thee mine before thou didst request it, And yet I would it were to give again.

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Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: My bounty is as boundless as the sea, My love as deep. The more I give to thee, The more I have, for both are infinite.

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Romeo - Son to Montague: O blessed, blessed night! I am afeard, Being in night, all this is but a dream, Too flattering sweet to be substantial.

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Romeo - Son to Montague: How silver-sweet sound lovers' tongues by night, Like softest music to attending ears!

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Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: 'Tis almost morning. I would have thee gone. And yet no further than a wanton's bird, And with a silken thread plucks it back again, So loving-jealous of his liberty.

Romeo - Son to Montague: I would I were thy bird.

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Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow.

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Romeo - Son to Montague: Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast. Would I were sleep and peace, so sweet to rest.

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Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: That same pale hard-hearted wench, that Rosaline, Torments him so, that he will sure run mad.

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Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: Alas, poor Romeo! He's already dead, stabbed with a white wench's black eye, shot through the ear with a love song, the very pin of his heart cleft with the blind bow-boy's butt shaft.

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Benvolio - Nephew to Montgue and Friend to Romeo: What is Tybalt?

Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: More than Prince of Cats, I can tell you. Oh, he's the courageous captain of compliments. These fashion-mongers, these "pardon me's," Oh, their bones, their bones! He fights as you sing prick-song, keeps time, distance, and proportion. One, two, and the third in your bosom. The very butcher of a silk button, a duelist, a duelist, the immortal passado, the punto reverso, the hai!

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Benvolio - Nephew to Montgue and Friend to Romeo: Here comes Romeo!

Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: Without his roe, like a dried herring. O flesh, flesh, how art thou fishified!

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Nurse to Juliet: God ye good morrow, gentlemen.

Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: God ye good day, fair gentlewoman.

Nurse to Juliet: Is it good day?

Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: 'Tis no less, I tell you, for the bawdy hand of the dial is now upon the prick of noon.

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Nurse to Juliet: I'll take him down, an he were lustier than he is, and twenty such Jacks. And if I cannot, I'll find those that shall. Scurvy knave!

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Nurse to Juliet: Pray you, sir, a word. As I told you, my young lady bid me inquire you out. What she bade me say, I'll keep to myself. But first let me tell ye, that should lead her into a fool's paradise, as they say, it were a very gross kind of behavior, as they say. For the gentlewoman is young.

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Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: Thou, why, thou wilt quarrel with a man that hath a hair more or a hair less in his beard than thou hast. Thou wilt quarrel with a man for cracking nuts, having no other reason but because thou hast hazel eyes. Thou hast quarreled with a man for coughing in the street because he's awakened thy dog that hath lain asleep in the sun. And yet you will tutor me from quarreling!

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Tybalt - Nephew to Lady Capulet: Gentlemen, good day. A word with one of you.

Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: And but one word with one of us? Couple it with something. Make it a word and a blow.

Tybalt - Nephew to Lady Capulet: You shall find me apt enough to that, sir, and you will give me occasion.

Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: Could you not take some occasion without giving?

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Tybalt - Nephew to Lady Capulet: Mercutio, thou consort'st with Romeo.

Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: Consort? What, dost thou make us minstrels? And thou make minstrels of us, look to hear nothing but discords.

[draws his sword]

Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: Here's my fiddlestick. Here's that will make you dance. Zounds, "consort"!

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Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: Calm dishonourable, vile submission! Alla stoccata carries it away. Tybalt! You ratcatcher, will you walk?

Tybalt - Nephew to Lady Capulet: What wouldst thou have with me?

Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: Good King of Cats, nothing but one of your nine lives!

[draws his sword]

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Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: I am hurt. A plague on both your houses!

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Romeo - Son to Montague: Courage, man. The hurt cannot be much.

Mercutio - Kinsman to the Prince and Friend to Romeo: No, 'tis not so deep as a well nor so wide as a church-door, but 'tis enough, 'twill serve. Ask for me tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man. I am peppered, I warrant, for this world. Zounds, a dog, a rat, a mouse, a cat to scratch a man to death! A braggart, a rogue, a villain that fights by the book of arithmetic! Why the devil came you between us? I was hurt under your arm.

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Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: Come, gentle night, come, loving, black-browed night, Give me my Romeo. And when he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine, That all the world will be in love with night, And pay no worship to the garish sun.

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Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: My husband lives, that Tybalt would have slain, And Tybalt's dead, that would have slain my husband. All this is comfort. Wherefore weep I then? "Tybalt is dead, and Romeo banishèd." That "banishèd," that one word "banishèd". Hath slain ten thousand Tybalts. Romeo is banishèd! O, to speak that word, Is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Juliet, All slain, all dead!

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Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: Wilt thou be gone? It is not yet near day. It was the nightingale, and not the lark, That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear. Nightly she sings on yon pomegranate tree. And believe me, love, it was the nightingale.

Romeo - Son to Montague: It was the lark, the herald of the morn, No nightingale. Look. Look, what envious streaks, Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east. Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day, Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops. I must be gone and live, or stay and die.

Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: Yon light is not daylight, I know it, I. It is some meteor that the sun exhales, To be to thee this night a torchbearer, And light thee on thy way to Mantua. Therefore stay yet. Thou need'st not to be gone.

Romeo - Son to Montague: I am content, so thou wilt have it so. I'll say yon grey is not the morning's eye. Nor that is not the lark, whose notes do beat, The vaulty heaven so high above our heads. I have more care to stay than will to go. Come, death, and welcome! How is my soul? Let's talk. It is not day.

Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: It is, it is. Hie hence! Be gone, away! It is the lark that sings so out of tune. O, now be gone. More light and light it grows.

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Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: Art thou gone so? My lord, my love, my friend. Oh, think'st thou we shall ever meet again?

Romeo - Son to Montague: I doubt it not, and all these woes shall serve, For sweet discourses in our time to come.

Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: O God, I have an ill-divining soul. Methinks I see thee now, thou art below, As one dead in the bottom of a tomb.

Romeo - Son to Montague: Dry sorrow drinks our blood. Adieu, adieu!

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Lord Capulet: Hang thee, young baggage! Disobedient wretch!

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Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: Is there no pity sitting in the clouds, That sees into the bottom of my grief?

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Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: Ancient damnation! O most wicked fiend! Go, counselor. Thou and my bosom henceforth shall be twain. I'll to the friar to know his remedy. If all else fail, myself have power to die.

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Paris - Young Nobleman Kinsman to the Prince: Juliet, tomorrow early will I arouse you. Till then, adieu, and keep this holy kiss.

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Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: Farewell!-God knows when we shall meet again.

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Romeo - Son to Montague: If I may trust the flattering truth of sleep, My dreams presage some joyful news at hand. I dreamt my lady came and found me dead- Strange dream, that gives a dead man leave to think- And breathed such life with kisses in my lips, That I revived and was an emperor.

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Romeo - Son to Montague: News from Verona!-How now, Balthasar? Dost thou not bring me letters from the friar? How doth my lady? Is my father well? How fares my Juliet? That I ask again, For nothing can be ill if she be - - well.

Balthasar: Then she is well, and nothing can be ill. Her body sleeps in Capels' monument, And her immortal part with angels lives.

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Romeo - Son to Montague: Live and be prosperous, and farewell, good fellow.

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Romeo - Son to Montague: O my love, my wife! Death, that hath sucked the honey of thy breath, Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty. Thou art not conquered. Beauty's ensign yet, Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks, And death's pale flag is not advancèd there.- Ah, dear Juliet, I still will stay with thee, And never from this palace of dim night, Depart again. here, Will I set up my everlasting rest, And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars, From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last. Arms, take your last embrace. And, lips, O you, The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss, A dateless bargain to engrossing death.

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Romeo - Son to Montague: Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide. Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on, The dashing rocks thy seasick, weary bark. Here's to my love!

[drinks the poison]

Romeo - Son to Montague: O true apothecary, Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss - I die.

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Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: O churl, drunk all, and left no friendly drop, To help me after? I will kiss thy lips. Haply some poison yet doth hang on them.

[kisses Romeo]

Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: Thy lips are warm.

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Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: Yea, noise? Then I'll be brief. O happy dagger, This is thy sheath.

[stabs herself]

Juliet - Daughter to Capulet: There rust and let me die.

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Escalus - Prince of Verona: Capulet! Montague! See what a scourge is laid upon your hate, That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love! And I, for winking at your discords, too, Have lost a brace of kinsmen. All are punished.

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Escalus - Prince of Verona: [final lines] A glooming peace this morning with it brings. The sun, for sorrow, will not show his head. There never was a story of more woe, Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.

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