Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs (1943) - News Poster

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The Forgotten: Hitler, Dead or Alive

You know about in-betweeners? They're the people who, in classical studio animation, draw the characters in between the key poses. The key poses are drawn by the animator. In-betweeners may be less experienced, less talented, less smart, or not. Their work is certainly essential to the illusion of smooth motion.

Now, in Bob Clampett's Warner Bros. cartoon Book Revue (1946), there's a scene where Daffy Duck, dressed in a zoot suit, is attempting to save Little Red Riding Hood from the Big Bad Wolf (it's complicated—no, "complicated" isn't the word, it's batshit crazy). Helpfully showing what the Wolf does to little girls, Daffy sprinkles salt on her leg and mimes the act of gnawing, only to realize that the Wolf himself is just behind him, about to gnaw on his own leg.

Clampett has Daffy turn and perform one of those extreme takes popular with animators of the forties,
See full article at MUBI »

Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs (…and that’s not a typo)

There’s no debate that if you even want to begin to discuss the stereotyped images of black people that we see today in the media, then you have to go back 30, 40, 50, 60 years ago and even beyond then to get an idea of how we were portrayed back then. It’s not too fine a stretch to say what you see today and get upset about can be directly traced to movies and other images long before you were a gleam in your parent’s eye. (And one could also argue that there isn’t much of difference between then and now either…)

Case in point, the notorious 1944 Warner Bros cartoon Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs by Robert Clampett who along with Friz Freleng and Chuck Jones was one of the Warner’s three top animation directors of the period. The cartoon is one of the infamous “Censored 11″ Warner
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Racist Looney Tunes Cartoons to be Released Next Year

According to ToonZone, Warner Bros has decided to release their controversial "Censored Eleven" animated shorts, which is a group of "Looney Tunes" and "Merrie Melodies" cartoons that have been withheld from syndication due to their racist content that has been deemed to offensive for audiences. The cartoons have been the most requested titles and the studio is planning to make them available next year through the Warner Archive online. They will be completely uncensored. While the "Censored Eleven" will likely not be promoted in any way, the studio apparently agrees that it's important to release them due to their historical significance. The titles include: "Hittin' the Trail for Hallelujah Land," "Sunday Go to Meetin' Time," "Clean Pastures," "Uncle Tom's Bungalow," "Jungle Jitters," "The Isle of Pingo Pongo," "All This and Rabbit Stew," "Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs," "Tin Pan Alley Cats," "Angel Puss and Goldilocks" and "The Jivin' Bears.
See full article at Worst Previews »

Looney Tunes' Infamous Racist Cartoons to be Released in 2011

Looney Tunes' Infamous Racist Cartoons to be Released in 2011
Filed under: DVDs, Movie News, Cinematical

Should films with antiquated, offensive treatment of race be seen? Or should they be banned, kept inside a vault forever or destroyed? This is a debate that often comes up when films like 'Birth of a Nation,' 'Song of the South' and 'Triumph of the Will' are discussed for potential screenings and/or home video release. But how about 'Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs'? Or 'Jungle Jitters'? Those are two of the "Censored Eleven," a group of infamous Warner Bros. animated shorts -- mostly of the 'Merrie Melodies' franchise, though one is a Chuck Jones-helmed 'Looney Tunes' cartoon -- that have been officially withheld from syndication by United Artists since 1968. Now, after forty-two years, these films are set for release sometime in 2011 through the Warner Archive, according to ToonZone, who learned the news this week at the New York Comic-Con.
See full article at Cinematical »

Looney Tunes' Infamous Racist Cartoons to be Released in 2011

  • Moviefone
Filed under: DVDs, Movie News, Cinematical

Should films with antiquated, offensive treatment of race be seen? Or should they be banned, kept inside a vault forever or destroyed? This is a debate that often comes up when films like 'Birth of a Nation,' 'Song of the South' and 'Triumph of the Will' are discussed for potential screenings and/or home video release. But how about 'Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs'? Or 'Jungle Jitters'? Those are two of the "Censored Eleven," a group of infamous Warner Bros. animated shorts -- mostly of the 'Merrie Melodies' franchise, though one is a Chuck Jones-helmed 'Looney Tunes' cartoon -- that have been officially withheld from syndication by United Artists since 1968. Now, after forty-two years, these films are set for release sometime in 2011 through the Warner Archive, according to ToonZone, who learned the news this week at the New York Comic-Con.
See full article at Moviefone »

Sexed Up 'Looney Tunes' Coming Next Year

The foundation of capitalism is that it's all about supply and demand—in this case the demand for Warner Bros contentious "Censored Eleven" animated shorts. If you haven't heard about these, they consist of a set of "Looney Tunes" and "Merrie Melodies" cartoons that have been withheld from syndication by United Artists since 1968 due to racist content that has, up to now, been deemed to offensive for audiences.

Perhaps not surprisingly, according to Toon Zone News, the cartoons have been the most requested titles and the studio is planning to make them available next year through the Warner Archive online…completely and thoroughly uncensored. Chalk one up for the Internet.

While the "Censored Eleven" likely won't be promoted on any new releases or on TV, the studio apparently agrees that it's important to make them available due to their historical significance. In our 21st century cable and YouTube dominated universe,
See full article at CinemaSpy »

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