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‘Barry Lyndon’ Live Score First Look: Experience Stanley Kubrick’s Period Drama Like Never Before — Watch

‘Barry Lyndon’ Live Score First Look: Experience Stanley Kubrick’s Period Drama Like Never Before — Watch
Getting to experience a Stanley Kubrick movie on the big screen is always a treat, especially in 2017. But when you throw in a 50-peice orchestra performing a live score, that experience suddenly becomes even more jaw-dropping.

Such will be the case on April 8 when the musicians of the Wordless Music Orchestra take the stage at the Kings Theater in Brooklyn to accompany “Barry Lyndon.” The original score, which has been newly transcribed by composer Frank Cogliano, will be performed in its entirety and synced live to the film.

Read More: How Live Film Scores Are Finding New Life in the Age of Netflix

Last Tuesday night, members of the Wordless Music Orchestra performed a preview concert of selections from the one-night-only event, and you can check out a first look at their arrangements in the video below.

Songs performed include Handel’s Sarabande, the third movement of Vivaldi’s Cello Concerto in E Minor,
See full article at Indiewire »

Meet 'Oitnb''s Secret Metalhead: Inside Jessica Pimentel's Double Life

Meet 'Oitnb''s Secret Metalhead: Inside Jessica Pimentel's Double Life
It's just after 6 p.m. on a Friday, and Duff's – a noisy heavy-metal bar adorned with autographed memorabilia and jagged-looking instruments in Williamsburg, Brooklyn – has just opened its doors to the sober, work-weary masses. In the center of the room, a woman clad in a black dress and high heels is headbanging atop a carpet adorned with Iron Maiden's corpse-mascot Eddie. The music is "Bleed," an angular, machine-gun–like aural assault that's little over seven minutes long, by Swedish extreme-metal growlers Meshuggah. Bargoers sip their beer in the back,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Ravi Shankar’s only opera ‘Sukanya’ to tour UK in world premiere

The Royal Opera, London Philharmonic Orchestra and Curve present the world premiere of Ravi Shankar’s only opera Sukanya which tours venues across the UK in May 2017. With a libretto by Amit Chaudhuri, the semi-staged opera is directed by Suba Das and conducted by David Murphy, with soprano Susanna Hurrell in the title role, bass-baritone Keel Watson, Brazilian baritone Michel de Souza, the BBC Singers and the full force of a 60-strong London Philharmonic Orchestra. The Orchestra is supplemented with Indian classical instruments including the sitar, shennai, tabla, mridangam and ghatam. The innovative Aakash Odedra Company provide the choreography and dancers and Tony Award-winning 59 Productions are providing production design.

Shankar was composing his pioneering opera Sukanya at the time of his passing, an opera exploring the common ground between the music, dance and theatrical traditions of India and the West. Conductor and collaborator David Murphy – who worked with Shankar for many years,
See full article at Bollyspice »

"Masculin Féminin" Musique

The new 2K digitization and restoration of Jean-Luc Godard's Masculin Féminin (1966) that premiered at the Cannes Film Festival is exclusively playing on Mubi in most countries around the world May 22 - June 21, 2016.Over opening credit titles that proclaim the film to be a French production, the “La Marseillaise,” the French national anthem, is heard being whistled off-screen. Then, spelt out with grating gunshots, the film’s title: Ma – Scu – Lin FÉMININ: 15 Faits PRÉCIS.It’s Paris. 1965. Sex, violence, revolution—change is in the air. Two youths, one male and one female, meet in a small cafe and begin a love affair. Paul (Jean-Pierre Léaud) is a passionate idealist who is driven by poetry and literature and is becoming increasingly indignant with the commercialization (read: Americanization) of the world around him. Madeline (Chantal Goya) is a hard worker who has a stable job at a magazine and is pursuing her
See full article at MUBI »

Watch First Night of the Proms 2015 on FilmOn

  • ShockYa
Music lovers will love to watch BBC Two’s “First Night of the Proms 2015,” which is currently streaming on FilmOn. The television program gives viewers an in-home concert of classical music. The program takes place in the Royal Albert Hall and will also mark the 150 anniversaries of two Nordic composers and the world premiere of “Dadaville” by British composer Gary Carpenter. The event also features soloist Lars Vogt as he performs Mozart’s “Piano Concerto No. 20.” Other performances by the BBC Symphony Orchestra and Chorus include William Walton’s “Belshazzar’s Feast,” Jean Sibelius’ version of the classic Belshazzar story, and Carl Nielsen’s “Maskarade.” The BBC Symphony Orchestra and Chorus is [ Read More ]

The post Watch First Night of the Proms 2015 on FilmOn appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

Kcc: Reitzell plays with instrumentation in Hannibal, Ep. 3.07, “Digestivo”

Kate’s Classical Corner: Hannibal, Ep. 3.07, “Digestivo”

As a classical musician, I can’t help but be influenced in my interpretation of Hannibal by its amazing score and soundtrack, composed and compiled by music supervisor Brian Reitzell. This is not intended to be a definitive reading of Reitzell or showrunner Bryan Fuller’s intentions in regards to the music, but rather an exploration of how these choices affect my appreciation of the given episode. Read my review of “Digestivo” here.

Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, K. 467, II. Andante by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1785): Mason entertains Hannibal and Will

(15:06)

This lovely piece is a fitting choice to accompany Mason’s dinner—he’s always trying to ape Hannibal and Hannibal is a fan of Mozart—but it’s made all the better by being a reference to The Spy Who Loved Me. In this Bond film the villain, Stromberg,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Friday’s best TV

  • The Guardian - TV News
Music from both this year’s Proms at the Royal Albert Hall and the early days of rock’n’roll in the Us, comedy from standup Josh Widdicombe and sitcom Bored to Death, and photography from some well-known snappers on Artsnight. Plus the penultimate episode of Norwegian war saga The Saboteurs and sport

Katie Derham and Tom Service introduce the first of this year’s Proms concerts from the Royal Albert Hall. This is the 150th anniversary of the birth of two great Scandinavian composers: Carl Nielsen and Jean Sibelius. By way of birthday gifts, the programme features Nielsen’s Maskarade and Sibelius’s Belshazzar’s Feast, along with William Walton’s version of the latter, a world premiere of new work by British composer Gary Carpenter, and German pianist Lars Vogt taking the solo on Mozart’s Concerto No 20 in D Minor. Andrew Mueller

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

April 1 Classical Reviews Roundup

Fillip Cornershop Satiediously, vol. 2 (Unheard Universe)   Following up on last year's initial Satie volume, Cornershop now delivers a unique reading of Satie's notorious "Vexations," the one-page piece which Satie said should be performed with repeats until it totaled 840 times through the printed text (or perhaps not; debate has raged since its 1949 publication). Cornershop brings the piece in at a monumental 48 hours (more traditional performances of the 840-times length range from 18 to 28 hours). 

As I was wondering how Cornershop could achieve such a performance without the aid of caffeine, which in turn would mitigate against his chosen slow tempo, I noticed a splice after the 168th time through and then, in turn, after the 336th. Shortly after the latter, and concurrent with my wife's threat of divorce, I had to stop listening, but a little math revealed to me that 1 through 168 and 169 through 336 were precisely the same length, so it appears
See full article at CultureCatch »

2015 Grammys winners: The complete list

  • Hitfix
2015 Grammys winners: The complete list
Complete list of winners and nominees of the 2014 Grammy Awards, held in Los Angeles at the Staples Center on Sunday February 8. Winners will be updated as they're announced during the telecast and pre-telecast. Record Of The Year “Fancy,” Iggy Azalea Featuring Charli Xcx “Chandelier,” Sia **Winner** “Stay With Me (Darkchild Version),” Sam Smith “Shake It Off,” Taylor Swift “All About That Bass,” Meghan Trainor Album Of The Year **Winner** “Morning Phase,” Beck “Beyoncé,” Beyoncé “X,” Ed Sheeran “In The Lonely Hour,” Sam Smith “Girl,” Pharrell Williams Song Of The Year “All About That Bass,” Kevin Kadish & Meghan Trainor, songwriters (Meghan Trainor) “Chandelier,” Sia Furler & Jesse Shatkin, songwriters (Sia) “Shake It Off,” Max Martin, Shellback & Taylor Swift, songwriters (Taylor Swift) **Winner** “Stay With Me (Darkchild Version),” James Napier, William Phillips & Sam Smith, songwriters (Sam Smith) “Take Me To Church,” Andrew Hozier-Byrne, songwriter (Hozier) Best New Artist Iggy Azalea Bastille Brandy Clark
See full article at Hitfix »

A Comeback Continues, a Career Ascends

Maxim Vengerov/New York Philharmonic/Long Yu Avery Fisher Hall, January 22, 2015

This week, Chinese conductor Long Yu is leading the New York Philharmonic in subscription concerts for the first time (his previous appearances at the orchestra's helm were non-subscription Lunar New Year celebrations). Meanwhile, Maxim Vengerov, once the most spectacular violinist on the scene, continues his comeback from an injury. Thursday night their paths intersected at Avery Fisher Hall in a Russian program that indicated each is on the right path.

Reports of earlier concerts in Vengerov's comeback were somewhat disheartening. Rumor has it that he's been focusing on the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto, which opened the concert, because it's relatively easy for him. In a way, this is hilarious; this work, written in 1878, was intended for Hungarian virtuoso Leopold Auer, but Auer turned down the opportunity to premiere it, calling it "unplayable." But compared to the slashing Prokofiev concertos on which Vengerov built his reputation,
See full article at CultureCatch »

Emily S. Whitten: The Music of Sherlock Holmes

  • Comicmix
This past weekend, Sherlock Holmes fans from all over the world gathered in New York City to celebrate Holmes’ birthday at the annual Bsi Weekend, hosted in main part by The Baker Street Irregulars, a Sherlockian literary society founded by Christopher Morley in 1934. As a longtime Holmes fan myself, this was my third year attending, and, as before, I had a great time with Sherlockian friends old and new, discussing and honoring the great detective, his faithful chronicler Dr. Watson, and the peripheral cast of characters (including the original Bsi, Holmes’ group of street urchin informants) created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

I first attended the Bsi Weekend in January 2012 after organizing a Sherlock Holmes Night at The National Press Club and learning in the process about our local Sherlockian scion society, The Red Circle, and the Bsi Weekend celebrations. And in honor of the Bsi and Sherlock Holmes, today
See full article at Comicmix »

Czech Philharmonic and Jirí Bělohlávek Shine at Carnegie

Czech Philharmonic/Jirí Bělohlávek with Jean-Yves Thibaudet Janáček: Taras Bulba Liszt: Piano Concerto No. 2 Dvořák:Symphony No. 9, "From the New World" Carnegie Hall Nov. 16, 2014

Since I previewed this Sunday afternoon concert, I'll skip repeating the background information -- except to note that I've since learned this was the group's first NYC appearance in ten years -- and get right to considering the performance itself. To give away the conclusion up front, in my notes, I used the words "perfect" and "wonderful" a lot.

The Janáček tone poem opened the program. It's not a favorite of mine (actually, it may be my least favorite piece by this composer), but Bělohlávek and his band can't be faulted. Tempos were a bit on the quick side (23 minutes total), welcomingly limiting the bombast somewhat, yet everything was still crystal clear. Early on the concertmaster, Josef Špaček Jr., demonstrated his magnificent combination of warm tone, supple phrasing,
See full article at CultureCatch »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: I’ve Always Loved You

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: Aug. 26, 2014

Price: DVD $24.95, Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Olive Films

William Carter falls for Catherine McLeod in I've Always Loved You.

A beautiful young concert pianist is torn between her attraction to her arrogant but brilliant maestro and her love for a farm boy she left back home in Frank Borzage’s 1946 drama romance I’ve Always Loved You.

Set in the world of classical music, a domineering maestro (Philip Dorn) exerts a Svengali-like control over Myra, a talented young pianist (Catherine McLeod). Frustrated by Leopold’s domineering nature, the girl abandons her professional career and marries a humble farmer (William Carter). Years later, haunted by regret, Myra returns to face her former mentor, to prove that she was, and continues to be, a better musician than he ever credited her with being.

Legendary pianist Arthur Rubinstein performs the pieces heard in the film (by Beethoven, Chopin, Mozart, Wagner,
See full article at Disc Dish »

How Eddie Braben saved Morecambe and Wise's careers

The comedy duo looked uncomfortable on television until Braben came on board. But how did he turn them into comedy legends?

In his memoirs The Book What I Wrote, Eddie Braben, who has died at the age of 82, reports a conversation with the Duke of Edinburgh at a showbiz event. When Braben mentioned that he wrote the scripts for Morecambe & Wise, the Queen's consort snorted: "I thought they just made it up."

Prince Philip's comment reflects a common confusion among comedy audiences – and some comedians do indeed write or ad-lib their own stuff – but, with Braben and Morecambe & Wise, it was more the other way round: in a crucial sense, he made them up.

In 1968, Braben, a Liverpudlian who had become a gag writer for acts including Ken Dodd, was approached by the BBC to take over as lead writer on the Morecambe & Wise Show, which had been poached from ITV.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Eddie Braben obituary

Scriptwriter behind the Morecambe and Wise television shows

The scriptwriter Eddie Braben, who has died aged 82, was best known for his outstanding 14-year association with the television comedians Eric Morecambe and Ernie Wise. It was thanks to him that Wise started talking about the plays "what he had wrote – sometimes 26 in one day". Celebrities infrom other spheres were ready and eager to take part, especially in the Morecambe and Wise Christmas specials, which became part of British life in the period.

It was Braben who scripted Glenda Jackson to appear in "Ern's" Antony and Cleopatra and gave her the grandly uttered line: "All men are fools, and what makes them so is having beauty like what I have got." André Previn was the long-suffering conductor of Morecambe's account of the Grieg Piano Concerto, "the right notes – though not necessarily in the right order", and Yehudi Menuhin was told he could
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Classical American Pianist Dies

Classical American Pianist Dies
Fort Worth, Texas — For a time in Cold War America, Van Cliburn had all the trappings of a rock star: sold-out concerts, adoring, out-of-control fans and a name recognized worldwide. He even got a ticker-tape parade in New York City.

And he did it all with only a piano and some Tchaikovsky concertos.

The celebrated pianist played for every American president since Harry Truman, plus royalty and heads of state around the world. But he is best remembered for winning a 1958 piano competition in Moscow that helped thaw the icy rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union.

Cliburn, who died Wednesday at 78 after fighting bone cancer, was "a great humanitarian and a brilliant musician whose light will continue to shine through his extraordinary legacy," said his publicist and longtime friend Mary Lou Falcone. "He will be missed by all who knew and admired him, and by countless people he never met.
See full article at Huffington Post »

Smearing the Senses: Tony Scott, Action Painter

  • MUBI
This text was begun in mid-to-late 2010. I posted two work-in-progress excerpts on my personal blog in December of that year. Following Scott's death, I decided that it was time to revise and complete it.

***

More often than not, innovation resembles deficiency. Jean-Luc Godard couldn't tell a story, Yasujiro Ozu never learned the 180 degree rule, Robert Bresson didn't know how to direct actors, D.W. Griffith first didn't understand that the audience wanted to see the whole actress and not just her face and then didn't understand how you were supposed to make a talkie—and, toward the end of his career, Tony Scott made movies the wrong way, never letting an image hold long enough for the viewer to figure out just exactly what was going on.

The party line on Tony Scott is that he was a "stylist," a man who made popular, "technically accomplished" and therefore insubstantial films; he
See full article at MUBI »

Allow Fifty Shades Of Grey – The Classical Album To Complete Your Own Red Room Of Pain

Probably some of you were a little too busy with, er, other things on your mind while reading Fifty Shades of Grey to realize author E.L. James was giving you the perfect playlist for your very own, um, enjoyment. Or if you’re that great a multi-tasker, in between buying that complete set of restraints and riding crops, you’ve already downloaded all the Thomas Tallis, Bach and more that accompanies Ana and Christian’s adventures in and out of the “Red Room of Pain,” For the rest of us, Emi has actually compiled a bunch of those songs into Fifty Shades of Grey – The Classical Album (alas, that means no Britney Spears or Kings of Leon will be included).

“I am thrilled that the classical pieces that inspired me while I wrote the Fifty Shades Trilogy are being brought together in one collection for all lovers of the books to enjoy,
See full article at TheFabLife - Movies »

Wallace: 'I have a feeling Gromit has a hankering to be a composer himself'

The cheese-loving inventor has written a concerto for the Proms – without any help from his dog

Without being rude... your creations have a reputation for not always working as planned (1). How can you be sure your Concerto (2) will not end in tears?

Don't worry – me and Gromit will be backstage to keep an eye on things in person. What could possibly go wrong?

A concerto normally specifies which instrument(s) it has been written for. My Concerto in Ee, Lad does not do that. Is this a deliberate attempt to redefine musical form?

I just couldn't decide what to write it for – spoons, paper and comb, kazoo … So in the end I thought I'd just write it for all of them. With the odd cow bell thrown in for good measure.

Is Gromit pissed off you didn't ask him to collaborate with you?

I suspect an element of professional jealousy
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Wallace: 'I have a feeling Gromit has a hankering to be a composer himself'

The cheese-loving inventor has written a concerto for the Proms – without any help from his dog

Without being rude... your creations have a reputation for not always working as planned (1). How can you be sure your Concerto (2) will not end in tears?

Don't worry – me and Gromit will be backstage to keep an eye on things in person. What could possibly go wrong?

A concerto normally specifies which instrument(s) it has been written for. My Concerto in Ee, Lad does not do that. Is this a deliberate attempt to redefine musical form?

I just couldn't decide what to write it for – spoons, paper and comb, kazoo … So in the end I thought I'd just write it for all of them. With the odd cow bell thrown in for good measure.

Is Gromit pissed off you didn't ask him to collaborate with you?

I suspect an element of professional jealousy
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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