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Those Good Old Days (1941)

Approved | | Musical, Short | 16 August 1941 (USA)
Young Gloria's father and mother go out for the evening to see a television broadcast (yes, there was television in 1941!). Gloria's grandfather entertains her with stories about his days ... See full summary »

Director:

Jean Negulesco

Writer:

Jack Scholl (original screenplay)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
William T. Orr ... Joe La Rue
Jan Clayton ... Mrs. Joe La Rue - Formerly Miss Harris
Janet Chapman ... Gloria La Rue
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Storyline

Young Gloria's father and mother go out for the evening to see a television broadcast (yes, there was television in 1941!). Gloria's grandfather entertains her with stories about his days in vaudeville, and viewers see some of the musical numbers he performed with Gloria's grandmother those many years ago. Written by David Glagovsky <dglagovsky@prodigy.net>

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Genres:

Musical | Short

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

16 August 1941 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Melody Masters (1940-1941 season) #10: Those Good Old Days See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Warner Bros. See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Vitaphone production reel #369A. See more »

Soundtracks

My Old Shack in D-I-X-I-E
(uncredited)
Music by M.K. Jerome
Lyrics by Jack Scholl
Performed by William T. Orr (vocal and dance)
See more »

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User Reviews

 
A Fond Look Back
7 May 2004 | by Ron OliverSee all my reviews

A Warner Bros. Short Subject.

An elderly gentleman tells his granddaughter about THOSE GOOD OLD DAYS of vaudeville.

William T. Orr energetically performs his way through three sprightly musical numbers which illustrate a typical song-and-dance man's routine in the glory days of vaudeville. This pleasant little film was helmed by Jean Negulesco, later a celebrated director.

Notice the mention of television in the script. It greatly threatened the popularity of movies & radio, which had themselves been the cause of the demise of vaudeville. The reference is also ironic in that Mr. Orr would eventually become an important & talented executive producer in the new medium, responsible for many successful TV shows.

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Often overlooked or neglected today, the one and two-reel short subjects were useful to the Studios as important training grounds for new or burgeoning talents, both in front & behind the camera. The dynamics for creating a successful short subject was completely different from that of a feature length film, something akin to writing a topnotch short story rather than a novel. Economical to produce in terms of both budget & schedule and capable of portraying a wide range of material, short subjects were the perfect complement to the Studios' feature films.


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