The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer (1947) - News Poster

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Shirley Temple movies: 13 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Heidi,’ ‘The Little Princess,’ ‘Wee Willie Winkie’

Shirley Temple movies: 13 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Heidi,’ ‘The Little Princess,’ ‘Wee Willie Winkie’
As President Franklin D. Roosevelt once said, “It is a splendid thing that for just fifteen cents, an American can go to a movie and look at the smiling face of a baby and forget his troubles.”

Few Hollywood stars were ever as big –or little — as Shirley Temple. This dimpled darling with her bouncy corkscrew curls and delightful tap-dance routines brought cheer and spread sunshine to moviegoers during the darkest days of the Great Depression. She was the No. 1 box-office draw from 1935 to 1938 and was the first child star to be presented with a special Juvenile Academy Award for her big-screen contributions during 1934. She even had her own line of licensed merchandise including look-alike dolls, dishes and clothing. Before 1935 ended, her income from licensed goods would be more than $100,000 – doubling what she made from her movies.

SEEHonorary Oscars: Full list of 132 winners from Charlie Chaplin to Cicely Tyson

A born charmer,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Shirley Temple movies: 13 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Shirley Temple movies: 13 greatest films ranked from worst to best
As President Franklin D. Roosevelt once said, “It is a splendid thing that for just fifteen cents, an American can go to a movie and look at the smiling face of a baby and forget his troubles.”

Few Hollywood stars were ever as big –or little — as Shirley Temple. This dimpled darling with her bouncy corkscrew curls and delightful tap-dance routines brought cheer and spread sunshine to moviegoers during the darkest days of the Great Depression. She was the No. 1 box-office draw from 1935 to 1938 and was the first child star to be presented with a special Juvenile Academy Award for her big-screen contributions during 1934. She even had her own line of licensed merchandise including look-alike dolls, dishes and clothing. Before 1935 ended, her income from licensed goods would be more than $100,000 – doubling what she made from her movies.

A born charmer, Temple’s pint-sized characters regularly melted the hearts of the
See full article at Gold Derby »

I’ll Be Seeing You

This unusually sensitive, overlooked WW2 romance skips the morale-boosting baloney of the day. Two people meet on a train, each with a personal shame they dare not speak of. Ginger Rogers and Joseph Cotten are excellent under William Dieterle’s direction, and Shirley Temple doesn’t do half the damage you’d think she might.

I’ll Be Seeing You

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1944 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 85 min. / Street Date November 21, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Ginger Rogers, Joseph Cotten, Shirley Temple, Spring Byington, John Derek, Tom Tully, Chill Wills, Kenny Bowers.

Cinematography: Tony Gaudio

Film Editor: William H. Zeigler

Special Effects: Jack Cosgrove

Original Music: Daniele Amfitheatrof

Stunt Double: Cliff Lyons

Written by Marion Parsonette from a play by Charles Martin

Produced by Dore Schary

Directed by William Dieterle

Aha! A little research explains why several late-’40s melodramas from David O. Selznick come off as smart productions,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Several of Grant's Best Films Tonight on TCM

Cary Grant movies: 'An Affair to Remember' does justice to its title (photo: Cary Grant ca. late 1940s) Cary Grant excelled at playing Cary Grant. This evening, fans of the charming, sophisticated, debonair actor -- not to be confused with the Bristol-born Archibald Leach -- can rejoice, as no less than eight Cary Grant movies are being shown on Turner Classic Movies, including a handful of his most successful and best-remembered star vehicles from the late '30s to the late '50s. (See also: "Cary Grant Classic Movies" and "Cary Grant and Randolph Scott: Gay Lovers?") The evening begins with what may well be Cary Grant's best-known film, An Affair to Remember. This 1957 romantic comedy-melodrama is unusual in that it's an even more successful remake of a previous critical and box-office hit -- the Academy Award-nominated 1939 release Love Affair -- and that it was directed
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Shirley Temple Black obituary

Cherubic child star of the 1930s who returned to public life as a Us diplomat

From 1934 to 1938, when she was at the height of her fame, Shirley Temple (later known as Shirley Temple Black), who has died aged 85, appeared in films as a bright-eyed, curly-topped, dimpled cherub, whose chirpy singing and toddler's tap dancing were perfect antidotes to the depression. "During this depression, when the spirit of the people is lower than at any other time, it is a splendid thing that, for just 15 cents, an American can go to a movie and look at the smiling face of a baby and forget his troubles," Franklin D Roosevelt stated in 1935, referring to the world's biggest and littlest star.

Temple's message was "be optimistic", the title of the song she sang in Little Miss Broadway (1938). Her biggest hit songs were On the Good Ship Lollipop, from Bright Eyes (1934), which describes a
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

One of Top Stars of Hollywood's Studio Era and Later on a pro-Vietnam War, 'Conservative' Republican, Has Died

Shirley Temple dead at 85: Was one of the biggest domestic box office draws of the ’30s (photo: Shirley Temple in the late ’40s) Shirley Temple, one of the biggest box office draws of the 1930s in the United States, died Monday night, February 10, 2014, at her home in Woodside, near San Francisco. The cause of death wasn’t made public. Shirley Temple (born in Santa Monica on April 23, 1928) was 85. Shirley Temple became a star in 1934, following the release of Paramount’s Alexander Hall-directed comedy-tearjerker Little Miss Marker, in which Temple had the title role as a little girl who, left in the care of bookies, almost loses her childlike ways before coming around to regenerate Adolphe Menjou and his gang. That same year, Temple became a Fox contract player, and is credited with saving the studio — 20th Century Fox from 1935 on — from bankruptcy. Whether or not that’s true is a different story,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Shirley Temple Black, 1928-2014

Here's the last kind of news you want to hear, first thing in the morning. Shirley Temple Black, the quintessential child star, has passed away at 85 years old.

Temple's career exploded at the sage old age of 5, when she appeared in a string of massively successful hits for 20th Century Fox in 1934, including Little Miss Marker, Baby Take a Bow, and Bright Eyes. So fast and so complete was her success, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences created a brand new award that year just so that she could receive it, the non-competitive Special Oscar for best juvenile performance. She appeared in a shocking number of films throughout the 1930s, dominating the box office and generally making everybody much less depressed that there was a Depression on. Her career continued strongly until 1949, with the actress still appearing in classics like The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer and John Ford
See full article at FilmExperience »

Film News: Former Child Star Shirley Temple Dies at 85

San Francisco – She was the biggest movie star in the world at less than 10 years old. Shirley Temple (Black) – who entertained Depression weary audiences through most of the 1930s with her curly haired optimism – died on February 10th of natural causes at 85, according to a family representative.

Shirley Temple in the Film ‘Bright Eyes’ (1934)

Photo credit: 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment

Shirley Jane Temple had a remarkable life, beginning at a very young age as a megawatt child star, and after an attempt to transition into young adult roles, a “retirement” at 22 years old. Her next life phase included two marriages – the second lasting 54 years – and a productive era in politics and as a U.S. diplomat.

Temple was born in April of 1928 in Santa Monica, California. Her mother enrolled her in dance classes at the age of three, at the same time creating her famous ringlet hair style (copied
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Shirley Temple dies: The Hollywood icon's life in pictures

Shirley Temple dies: The Hollywood icon's life in pictures
Shirley Temple, star of classic Hollywood pictures The Little Princess and Heidi, has passed away at the age of 85.

A child star who made her film debut at the age of 5 in 1932's Red Haired Alibi, Temple appeared opposite some of film's greatest Golden Age stars such as John Wayne and Henry Fonda (in Fort Apache), Lionel Barrymore (The Little Colonel) and Cary Grant (The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer).

Temple won an honorary juvenile Academy Award for her contribution to film in 1934. She was awarded a star on the Walk of Fame in 1960, and in 2005 she was given the Lifetime Achievement Award by the Screen Actors Guild.

After stepping away from movies in 1949, Temple made a TV comeback in the late '50s with the series Shirley Temple's Storybook. Her final acting role was in a guest spot in 1963's The Red Skeleton Hour.

She later moved into politics, holding
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Shirley Temple Dies at 85

Shirley Temple Dies at 85
Shirley Temple, the dimpled, curly-haired child star who sang, danced, sobbed and grinned her way into the hearts of Depression-era moviegoers, has died, according to publicist Cheryl Kagan. She was 85. Temple, known in private life as Shirley Temple Black, died at her home near San Francisco. A talented and ultra-adorable entertainer, Shirley Temple was America's top box-office draw from 1935 to 1938, a record no other child star has come near. She beat out such grown-ups as Clark Gable, Bing Crosby, Robert Taylor, Gary Cooper and Joan Crawford. In 1999, the American Film Institute ranking of the top 50 screen legends ranked Temple at No.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Shirley Temple Dead at 85

  • Moviefone
Martha Mendoza, Associated Press

San Francisco (AP) - Shirley Temple, the dimpled, curly-haired child star who sang, danced, sobbed and grinned her way into the hearts of Depression-era moviegoers, has died. She was 85.

Temple, known in private life as Shirley Temple Black, died Monday night at her home near San Francisco. She was surrounded by family members and caregivers, publicist Cheryl Kagan said.

"We salute her for a life of remarkable achievements as an actor, as a diplomat, and most importantly as our beloved mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, and adored wife for fifty-five years of the late and much missed Charles Alden Black," a family statement said. The family would not disclose Temple's cause of death.

A talented and ultra-adorable entertainer, Shirley Temple was America's top box-office draw from 1935 to 1938, a record no other child star has come near. She beat out such grown-ups as Clark Gable, Bing Crosby, Robert Taylor,
See full article at Moviefone »

Episode Recap: Supernatural - 6.03: "The Third Man"

  • PopStar
A policeman, Hatch ( Todd Mann) cuts himself and his skin falls off, only his blood and entrails are left behind. Ooh Dean (Jensen Ackles) get a shirt! Dean is dreaming, Sam (Jared Padalecki) is exercising and Dean's on the road. So we see him naked too! Sam's been with a pro, (Julia Voth) which he wouldn't really do if he was the 'old' Sam. He pays her and where was Dean's tattoo as Sam still has his? Sam throws her card away - well he can hook up with anyone and he does that as routine now. Sam is in Pennsylvania and Dean tells him it's been one and a half days, since they were just on a case, Sam likes to work. Dean: "Who died and made you boss?" That's a loaded question for this show considering the number of deaths of lead characters and others. So don't answer that Sam.
See full article at PopStar »

Cary Grant: Jennifer Grant embraces TCM salute to movie-legend father

Jennifer Grant will be watching Sunday (Aug. 21) as her screen-legend father inhabits Turner Classic Movies for 24 hours straight.

Still widely considered one of the most singular of all film stars, Cary Grant will have his turn in the channel's annual, month-long "Summer Under the Stars" festival that showcases one actor's work each day. The lineup includes such Grant staples as "Bringing Up Baby," "Gunga Din," "The Philadelphia Story" and the Alfred Hitchcock-directed "North by Northwest."

Jennifer Grant's book "Good Stuff: A Reminiscence of My Father, Cary Grant" was published in May. Regarding Sunday's TCM picks, she tells Zap2it, "I love the movies they're showing. I'd seen all of Dad's films prior to writing the book, but the book really wasn't about his career. Many people could write better books about his history in the cinema, but the way I know him is as a father. And I
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Sidney Sheldon Dies

  • WENN
Best-selling American author Sidney Sheldon has died of complications from pneumonia at the age of 89. His publicist reveals Sheldon died on Tuesday at Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage, near his home in Palm Springs, California. Sheldon was also an accomplished playwright, writer and producer and an Oscar-winning screenwriter. He started out writing movies, plays and TV shows, to great success. He won the Best Original Screenplay Academy Award in 1948 for the film The Bachelor And The Bobby-Soxer and also created the sitcom I Dream Of Jeannie. Sheldon only turned his hand to novel-writing at the age of 50, and went onto publish 18 novels and sell 300 million copies of books including Rage Of Angels and The Other Side Of Midnight.

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