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The Time of Your Life (1948)

Approved | | Comedy, Drama | 3 September 1948 (USA)
A wide variety of persons come into Nick's Pacific Street Saloon, some to ask for work and others just to pass the time.

Director:

H.C. Potter

Writers:

William Saroyan (Pulitzer Prize play), Nathaniel Curtis (adapted for the screen)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
James Cagney ... Joseph T. (who observes people)
William Bendix ... Nick (Saloon Owner Who Loves Horses)
Wayne Morris ... Tom (Joe's stooge and friend)
Jeanne Cagney ... Kitty Duval (stage name of Katerina Koronovsky)
Broderick Crawford ... Krupp (a bewildered policeman)
Ward Bond ... McCarthy (a blatherskite)
James Barton ... Kit Carson (a cowboy also called Murphy)
Paul Draper ... Harry (the natural-born tap dancing comedian)
Gale Page ... Mary L. (a woman of quality)
Jimmy Lydon ... Dudley Raoul Bostwick (a young man in love) (as James Lydon)
Richard Erdman ... Willie (the pinball machine maniac)
Pedro de Cordoba ... Arab Philosopher
Reginald Beane ... Wesley (the pianist)
John 'Skins' Miller John 'Skins' Miller ... A Tippler
Tom Powers ... Freddy Blick (a stool pigeon and frame-up artist)
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Storyline

Joe spends a lot of his time at Nick's Pacific Street Saloon. Tom, who credits Joe with once saving his life, stops by regularly to run errands for Joe. Today, Tom notices a woman named Kitty when she comes into Nick's, and he quickly falls in love with her. Meanwhile, a distraught young man repeatedly calls his girlfriend, begging her to marry him. Nick himself muses on all the various persons who come into his bar, some to ask for work and others just to pass the time. Written by Snow Leopard

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

You'll love these wonderful characters! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

3 September 1948 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

De bar der begoocheling See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Turner library print) | (Ontario)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The failure of the original copyright holder to renew the film's copyright resulted in it falling into public domain, meaning that virtually anyone could duplicate and sell a VHS/DVD copy of the film. Therefore, many of the versions of this film available on the market are either severely (and usually badly) edited and/or of extremely poor quality, having been duped from second- or third-generation (or more) copies of the film. See more »

Goofs

Joe points his gun at Blick and pulls the trigger. And when it doesn't go off he says "That dumb Tom. He buys a six shooter that won't even shoot once". Even though he knows he loaded and unloaded the gun early in the film. And it happens to be a gun that only holds 5 cartridges. See more »

Quotes

[The newsboy is singing When Irish Eyes Are Smiling]
Nick: Are you Irish?
Newsboy: No, I'm Greek.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Opening credits are shown on the pages of a book, through which someone is flipping. See more »

Connections

Version of Armchair Theatre: Time of Your Life (1958) See more »

Soundtracks

What Is This Thing Called Love?
(1929) (uncredited)
Music and lyrics by Cole Porter
Played on piano by Reginald Beane
Sung by Jeanne Cagney
See more »

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User Reviews

 
The Denizens of Nick's Bar
20 July 2005 | by theowinthropSee all my reviews

In 1941 Richard Rogers and Lawrence (Larry) Hart did the score of a brilliant musical called PAL JOEY. One highlight was a striptease dance and song done by Elaine Stritch towards the end of the second act, where she is a reporter talking about interviewing Gypsy Rose Lee. Gypsy (if you recall the movie with Natalie Wood) was always self-taught, and well read. The song spoofed this having her show off her knowledge (it begins with her mentioning reading Schopenhauer, not the easiest thing in the world). One couplet is the following:

"Zip, Walter Lippman wasn't brilliant today." "Zip, will Saroyan ever write a great play?"

It is a little ironic that this barb was directed to William Saroyan, as the star of PAL JOEY was Gene Kelly, who played "Harry, a natural born hoofer" in Saroyan's one and only Broadway success, THE TIME OF YOUR LIFE. Why the barb? Well William Saroyan was a popular short story writer and novelist, especially for books like MY NAME IS ARAM, about the life of the Armenian-American immigrants in California. However, try as he might he never wrote a monumental dramatic masterpiece. THE TIME OF YOUR LIFE is not in the same level of dramaturgy as A LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT, THE DEATH OF A SALESMAN, A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE, or WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF. THE TIME OF YOUR LIFE is a pleasant play, and still gets revived, but it is a lesser work for the stage. Even Thornton Wilder's OUR TOWN is considered a greater play.

The problem with THE TIME OF YOUR LIFE is that it shows the interactions of a set of characters in Nick's Bar. As was pointed out in another comment on this board, O'Neill's THE ICEMAN COMETH also is set in a bar. But the denizens of the bar at Harry Hope's flop house hotel are all failures, who drink to forget their failures and reassure themselves that they can pull themselves out of the failure sooner or later (none of them really can). Hickey, who comes to the hotel, tries to convince them they'll be happier giving up their "pipe dreams" if they admit they are not heroic or brave or capable of reform. You see, there is a theme that is uniting that play's characters. Saroyan is not (as was said) O'Neill. He was more optimistic, and he tried to show that the characters were capable of helping each other. At the end they join together to defeat the evil Blick.

Saroyan, like Wilder, was a master of Americana. In one sequence he has two characters get involved in a contest to see how much gum can be chewed at one time. O'Neill (even in a play like AH WILDERNESS, which is a comedy) never could be so Hamish. Saroyan invents very colorful characters, like his old timer "Kit Carson", who claims to be an old Indian fighter. The central figure in the play, Joe (or Joseph T.) is also colorful - he seems to be a former newspaperman who was successful, but began to regret getting involved in the awful world of the news - he has retreated to the bar where he'll hopefully find more gentle people. He is visited at one point by a woman, probably his former fiancé, and acknowledges her, but won't return to the madness he willingly left. The character is interesting, but none of the other characters reflect his point of view.

So we are left with a well acted, entertaining play - turned into a good movie. Cagney is remarkably subdued - look at the scene when he examines the little wind-up toys he has Wayne Morris buy for him. He maintains our interest until the end, but the lively Cagney does not show up until he confronts Blick.

William Bendix does his usual great job, especially when confronting Blick as a potential blackmailing scum. His Nick runs a respectable bar, and the threat Blick is hinting at is that a prostitute may be using the bar (Jeanne Cagney). Bendix knows nothing of this, but is concerned. Oddly enough, although the bar is a nice neighborhood one, Howard Freeman and Natalie Schaefer go to the bar (they are wealthy people) as though they are slumming.

The current film version does not have all the scenes that Cagney originally had shot. Wayne Morris's growing romance with Jeanne Cagney is cut down in the film (which is regrettable). There is also an interesting change in the conclusion (as in Saroyan's play itself) as to what happens to Blick. But the film is a good one, and a worthy addition to Jimmy Cagney's film record.


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