Danger (1950) - News Poster

(1950–1955)

News

When Animals Attack: Ranking Bloodthirsty Movie Predators

When Animals Attack: Ranking Bloodthirsty Movie Predators
Across her diverse filmography, Blake Lively has hung tough against the menaces of gun-toting criminals (The Town, Hick, Savages), mean rich teens (Gossip Girl), aging (The Age of Adaline), moving away from your friends (the Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants films), and being in Green Lantern (Green Lantern). Yet her latest project — the watery survival flick The Shallows — will pit the actress against her deadliest foe yet. After a surfing incident strands the starlet on a solitary outcropping of rock, a hungry shark encircles her as the tide rises. Teen soap opera alumna vs.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘Port of New York’ is a serviceable thriller boosted by a magnetic Yul Brynner

Port of New York

Written by Eugene Ling

Directed by Lazlo Benedek

U.S.A., 1949

Ports, much like airports and border crosses, are the among the most important gates through which returning citizens, visitors and imported goods much pass in order to step onto a territory’s soil. The level of security associated with such to and fro activity is unfathomable, ranging from the verification of travellers identification pieces to the inspection of whatever goods said arrivals want to bring with them into the new country or state. Just ask New York customs agent Jim Flannery (Richard Rober), tasked with investigating the sudden disappearance of drugs originally intended for medicinal use. Enter narcotics officer Michael Waters (Scott Brady) who, together with Jim Flannery, is on the prowl for the stolen goods. A suspect presumed to be involved with the clandestine operation, Toni Cardell (K.T. Stevens) is pressured into confessing critical information,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Boob on the Tube: Top Ten Worst Movie Adaptations of TV Shows

Some of the greatest (or at least heavily favored) American television shows got the big screen treatment when they were selected to have their small screen following turn into a cinematic experience. Unfortunately, for every beloved nostalgic television show that translated successfully in movie theaters (The Brady Bunch Movie, Star Trek, Batman, etc.) there are boob tube stinkers that overtake the good crop. Sure, there are middle-of-the-road movie adaptations of television programs that have a mixed bag reception (1997’s Leave It To Beaver, 1987’s Dragnet, 2012’s Dark Shadows, etc.). Nevertheless, it is always the unflattering fare that receive the bulk of the attention (do you register, 1999’s The Wild, Wild West ?).

In Boob on the Tube: Top Ten Worst Movie Adaptations of TV Shows we will take a look at the top ten televised offenders that dared to venture into cinema’s stratosphere only to end up floating down shamefully
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Remembering Actress Simon Part 2 - Deadly Sex Kitten Romanced Real-Life James Bond 'Inspiration'

Simone Simon in 'La Bête Humaine' 1938: Jean Renoir's film noir (photo: Jean Gabin and Simone Simon in 'La Bête Humaine') (See previous post: "'Cat People' 1942 Actress Simone Simon Remembered.") In the late 1930s, with her Hollywood career stalled while facing competition at 20th Century-Fox from another French import, Annabella (later Tyrone Power's wife), Simone Simon returned to France. Once there, she reestablished herself as an actress to be reckoned with in Jean Renoir's La Bête Humaine. An updated version of Émile Zola's 1890 novel, La Bête Humaine is enveloped in a dark, brooding atmosphere not uncommon in pre-World War II French films. Known for their "poetic realism," examples from that era include Renoir's own The Lower Depths (1936), Julien Duvivier's La Belle Équipe (1936) and Pépé le Moko (1937), and particularly Marcel Carné's Port of Shadows (1938) and Daybreak (1939).[11] This thematic and
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

What to Watch: Tonight's TV Picks - Game of Thrones, Made in Chelsea

Jamaica Inn: BBC One, 9pm

First of a three-part adaptation by Emma Frost of Daphne du Maurier's bleak romance. In 1821, Mary Yellan, a headstrong heroine, is forced to live with her aunt at Jamaica Inn in Cornwall following her mother's death. Danger and disaster await her on Bodmin Moor.

Her bullying uncle Joss is revealed to be a notorious smuggler, whose gang has control across the entire Cornish coastline. Life at the inn soon changes Mary as she begins to wonder whether she will change herself, surrounded by such immoral criminals. Even so, she cannot resist the charm of her uncle's enigmatic younger brother Jem.

Tommy Cooper: Not Like That, Like This: ITV, 9pm

Feature-length drama exploring the life of much-treasured comedian Tommy Cooper, written by Simon Nye and starring David Threlfall (Frank Gallagher from Shameless). There is attention given to Cooper's practised incompetence with magic tricks,
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Watch: Sidney Lumet’s 1955 Rejected TV Pilot 'The Challenge'

It’s been over two years since Sidney Lumet left us, but what he left us with is an incredible body of work that spans six decades (be sure to check out our retrospective). From his first feature film “12 Angry Men” to “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead,” which came out 50 years later, those who wish to tackle his entire filmography could understandably feel intimidated. Furthermore, before Lumet even made “12 Angry Men,” he had already directed hundreds of television episodes from ‘50s shows such as “Danger” and “You Are There.” The Seventh Art has recently discovered one of his more obscure works, which had been posted on YouTube a few years ago by Princeton University with barely over 1,000 views. Entitled “The Challenge,” the program was intended to be a pilot episode of a series meant to tackle various issues that were negatively affecting society. Lumet directed the episode, which
See full article at The Playlist »

Comic Book Release List – November 6, 2013

The following is a list of all comic books, graphic novels and specialty items that will be available this week and shipped to comic book stores who have placed orders for them.

3D Total Publishing

Sketching From The Imagination An Insight Into Creative Drawing Sc (not verified by Diamond), $29.99

Abrams

Star Wars Frames Hc, $150.00

Abrams Comicarts

Tintin The Art Of Herge Hc, $45.00

Alternative Comics

Look Straight Ahead Gn, $19.95

Amigo Comics

Rogues #5, $3.99

Amp! Comics For Kids

Snoopy Cowabunga Tp (not verified by Diamond), 9.99

Amulet Books

Diary Of A Wimpy Kid Volume 8 Hard Luck Hc, $13.95

Andrews McMeel

Dilbert I Sense A Coldness To Your Mentoring Tp, $12.99

Get Fuzzy The Fuzzy Bunch Tp, $12.99

Antarctic Press

Ghost Cop #1 (Of 3), $3.99

Last Zombie The End #5 (Of 5), $3.99

Steampunk Halloween 2013 #1, $3.50

Arcana Studio

Devil Is Due In Dreary Tp, $12.99

Steam Engines Of Oz #3, $3.99

Steam Engines Of Oz Volume 1 Tp, $19.95

Archie Comic Publications

Afterlife With Archie #1 (Francesco Francavilla 2nd Printing
See full article at GeekRest »

R.I.P. Ted Post

The man who helmed Clint Eastwood in Hang ‘Em High and Magnum Force, the first Dirty Harry sequel, died Tuesday at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica at 95. Ted Post also directed Beneath the Planet of the Apes, but he made his mark on the small screen. The Brooklyn native helmed dozens of TV shows, including 56 episodes of Gunsmoke, 90 of Peyton Place, 54 episodes of Waterfront, 24 of Rawhide — starring a young Eastwood — and four of The Twilight Zone. Starting his career in 1950 on the CBS anthology Danger, Post racked up TV credits including Perry Mason, Combat!, The Rifleman, Thriller, Baretta, Columbo and the 1981 Cagney & Lacey pilot. He also helmed a dozen TV movies, mostly during the 1970s, and nearly as many features. A service is planned for 1 Pm Friday at Mount Sinai Memorial Park in La.
See full article at Deadline TV »

Whitney Houston, Jennie Rivera and more of 2012's Gone but Not Forgotten

As a new year dawns, a tribute to those we've lost in the year now ending is merited ... and in 2012, those sad milestones have encompassed some of the most popular personalities in television history.

Andy Griffith: The actor-producer who put Mayberry on the map forever will be remembered as one of television's most genial personalities, also extending to his run as wily lawyer Matlock.

Dick Clark: The number of music stars who owe at least part of their success to the "American Bandstand" maestro is incalculable. Thanks to him, people also enjoy "New Year's Rockin' Eve," receive American Music Awards and have a greater appreciation of bloopers. Here's a "so long" salute to you, Dick.

Larry Hagman: The truly unfortunate irony of the veteran actor's recent death is that he was just starting his second round of "Dallas" success as master schemer J.R. Ewing. He'll also
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Tony Scott: A Moving Target—Movement A

  • MUBI
Part of the Tony Scott: A Moving Target critical project. Go here for the project's description, index and links to project's other movement.

This is one "movement" of our exquisite corpse-style critical project, Tony Scott: A Moving Target, which coincidentally begins with a look at Crimson Tide, the same movie that begins the other movement. As outlined in the introduction to the entire project, this project began in my mind, as something fairly simple: a snaking continuum of scene analysis. This is only in part what resulted.

The varied responses I got back from my group—"mine" in the sense that it is the one I participated in, since Gina's contribution closes Movement B—seem to say as much about the participating critics as they do about Tony Scott's films and the overlap between the two: the perception of Scott's films and career. Thus many entries, including my own,
See full article at MUBI »

Tiff 2012: Midnight Madness and Vanguard Lineups Announced; Lots of New Images

Horror fans, get ready to salivate over the lineup of genre films heading to Toronto this September for the Midnight Madness and Vanguard sections of the Toronto International Film Festival. We have all the details you need along with lots of new stills!

The fest runs September 6th-16th, and the full schedule will be posted on August 21st. While a few of the films listed aren't pure horror, they fall in the categories horror fans will be focusing on so we've included them here for general information.

Midnight Madness

The wild side: midnight screenings of the best in action, horror, shock, and fantasy cinema.

The ABCs of Death - World Premiere

Kaare Andrews, Angela Bettis, Adrián García Bogliano, Bruno Forzani & Hélène Cattet, Ernesto Díaz Espinoza, Jason Eisener, Xavier Gens, Jorge Michel Grau, Lee Hardcastle, Noboru Iguchi, Thomas Cappelen Malling, Anders Morgenthaler, Yoshihiro Nishimura, Banjong Pisanthanakun, Simon Rumley, Marcel Sarmiento,
See full article at Dread Central »

Tiff 2012 Adds ‘Seven Psychopaths,’ ‘Sightseers,’ ‘Room 237, ‘Dredd,’ ‘ABCs of Death’ & Much More

Following up an already stellar initial line-up, the Toronto International Film Festival 2012 has announced additional sections including Midnight Madness, Documentaries and Vanguard. When the clock strikes 12, some titles one will be able to see include the highly anticipated Seven Psychopaths, from In Bruges director Martin McDonagh. There’s also the world premiere of the horror anthology The ABCs of Death, as well as Dredd and Eli Roth‘s Aftershock and new films from Rob Zombie and Barry Levinson.

The documentary section brings new films from Alex Gibney, Ken Burns and an interesting one titled How to Make Money Selling Drugs, featuring interviews with 50 Cent, Eminem and more. Rounding out the Vanguard section is many titles screened elsewhere, including the excellent documentary on The Shining, Room 237, as well as the next from Kill List director Ben Wheatley, Sightseers (Cannes review). We also have Luis Prieto‘s Pusher remake, and Michel Gondry
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Amazing Spider-Man 1970s TV series review

As (500) Days Of Summer (2009) director Marc Webb's The Amazing Spider-Man swings into cinemas, with The Social Network and Never Let Me Go wunderkind Andrew Garfield wearing the red and blue pyjamas and Zombieland actress Emma Stone bringing Peter Parker's girlfriend Gwen Stacy to life while Rhys Ifans goes all Jekyll and Hyde on them as Doctor Curt Connors and The Lizard, it already feels as though Sam Raimi and Tobey McGuire's well received trilogy of barely a decade ago is 'old' Spidey.

However, nearly thirty years before The Evil Dead auteur finally put a human (as opposed to animated) version of our favourite webhead on the big screen, Spidey had made his live action debut on the small screen in 1974 in a series of short skits on the popular children's show The Electric Company. Played by puppeteer Danny Seagren, these three minute sketches which spanned a three year period
See full article at Shadowlocked »

'Big Lebowski' Actor Dead At 81

'Big Lebowski' Actor Dead At 81
New York — Ben Gazzara, whose powerful dramatic performances brought an intensity to a variety of roles and made him a memorable presence in such iconic productions over the decades as the original "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" on Broadway and the film "The Big Lebowski," has died at age 81.

Longtime family friend Suzanne Mados said Gazzara died Friday in Manhattan. Mados, who owned the Wyndham Hotel, where celebrities such as Peter Falk and Martin Sheen stayed, said he died after being placed in hospice care for cancer. She and her husband helped marry Gazzara and his wife, German-born Elke Krivat, at their hotel.

Gazzara was a proponent of method acting, in which the performer attempts to take on the thoughts and emotions of the character he's playing, and it helped him achieve stardom early in his career with two stirring Broadway performances.

In 1955, he originated the role of Brick Pollitt,
See full article at Huffington Post »

Ben Gazzara Dead: Actor Dies At 81

Ben Gazzara Dead: Actor Dies At 81
New York — Ben Gazzara, whose powerful dramatic performances brought an intensity to a variety of roles and made him a memorable presence in such iconic productions over the decades as the original "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" on Broadway and the film "The Big Lebowski," has died at age 81.

Longtime family friend Suzanne Mados said Gazzara died Friday in Manhattan. Mados, who owned the Wyndham Hotel, where celebrities such as Peter Falk and Martin Sheen stayed, said he died after being placed in hospice care for cancer. She and her husband helped marry Gazzara and his wife, German-born Elke Krivat, at their hotel.

Gazzara was a proponent of method acting, in which the performer attempts to take on the thoughts and emotions of the character he's playing, and it helped him achieve stardom early in his career with two stirring Broadway performances.

In 1955, he originated the role of Brick Pollitt,
See full article at Huffington Post »

Run, Chicken Run: How a Storyboard Comes Off A Soundboard

Let me tell you a story…

Forward (Creative Process 0.0):

Ever hear a song on the radio or Pandora or Xm or whatever gosh darn music listening device you might use these days and think, “Wow, I would love to use that in a movie soundtrack”? Believe it or not that’s pretty much all I think about when I listen to a few tracks. I’ve developed a strange compulsion to create movie scenes based around popular music. Some would probably call it daydream listening but I think neurosis is more applicable when it comes to the frequency with which I do this.

So I started compiling play lists of songs that fit together into a meaningful story line. Typically I would come up with a common thread or a general plot line and come up with scenes to flesh out that plot line to form… well… a movie script of sorts.
See full article at The Liberal Dead »

Top 100 movies of the 1970s

Michael York dashes onto the cinematic scene as the blundering but very enthusiastic D'Artagnan in Richard Lester's hugely enjoyable period comic romp. The late great Roy Kinnear is the long-suffering vassal of aristocratic swordsmen Oliver Reed, Richard Chamberlain and Frank Finlay, whilst Raquel Welch and Faye Dunaway shine as heroine and villainess, respectively. Producers Alexander and Ilya Salkind filmed the following year's sequel back-to-back with this more successful first part, which approach they would revisit shortly for Superman and Superman II. Dumas with wit, energy and integrity.

Notable Quotable: "That man in his time has insulted me, broken my father's sword, had me clubbed to the ground, laid violent hands on the woman I love! He is inconvenient. "

Martin Anderson

Mike Nichols and Buck Henry achieve what seemed impossible, at least on the evidence of an earlier attempt: to transliterate the pitch-dark war humour of Joseph Heller into a cohesive,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Director Sidney Lumet Passed Away at 86

Legendary director Sidney Lumet has died at the age of 86. The critically-acclaimed filmmaker passed away on Saturday morning, April 9 at his New York home after a battle with lymphoma.

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to actor/director Baruch Lumet and dancer Eugenia, he began his career as a child actor, appearing in a number of Broadway plays, including 1935's "Dead End" and "The Eternal Road".

He made his movie debut at the age of 11, in Yiddish short film "Papirossen", but halted his acting dreams to serve in the U.S. Army during World War II. Upon his return, he became involved in Off-Broadway productions as a director, before turning his attentions to TV in the 1950s.

Lumet's extensive small screen credits include hit series "Danger", "Mama" and "You Are There", which starred a young Walter Cronkite. But it was his movie work which really grabbed critics' attention - his first film,
See full article at Aceshowbiz »

Iconic Filmmaker Lumet Dead At 86

  • WENN
Iconic Filmmaker Lumet Dead At 86
Legendary director Sidney Lumet has died at the age of 86.

The critically-acclaimed filmmaker passed away on Saturday morning at his New York home after a battle with lymphoma.

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to actor/director Baruch Lumet and dancer Eugenia, he began his career as a child actor, appearing in a number of Broadway plays, including 1935's Dead End and The Eternal Road.

He made his movie debut at the age of 11, in Yiddish short film Papirossen, but halted his acting dreams to serve in the U.S. Army during World War II.

Upon his return, he became involved in Off-Broadway productions as a director, before turning his attentions to TV in the 1950s.

Lumet's extensive small screen credits include hit series Danger, Mama and You Are There, which starred a young Walter Cronkite.

But it was his movie work which really grabbed critics' attention - his first film, 12 Angry Men (1957), featured Henry Fonda as a courageous court juror who manages to convince the panel the defendant on trial for murder is innocent.

Social issues and the topic of morality were key to Lumet's work and he is perhaps best known for 1976 satire Network. The movie, starring William Holden, Peter Finch and Faye Dunaway, garnered a whopping 10 Oscar nominations, including honours for Best Film and Best Director. Network was awarded gold in four categories, with Finch taking Best Actor and Dunaway Best Actress.

He also directed 1962 drama A View From the Bridge, based on the play by Arthur Miller, and Long Day's Journey Into Night, which earned Katharine Hepburn an Oscar nod.

Lumet's other works included Agatha Christie crime classic Murder on the Orient Express in 1974, and he created a fantasy version of his beloved New York for his 1978 musical The Wiz, starring Michael Jackson and Diana Ross. The picture, a take on The Wizard of Oz, was a departure from Lumet's cutting-edge style of filmmaking and was a critical and commercial flop.

His films received a total of 40 Academy Award nominations throughout his career, and his leading stars included Marlon Brando, Paul Newman and Christopher Reeve.

Lumet was presented with the Lifetime Achievement Oscar in 2005.

He is survived by his fourth wife, Mary Gimbel, two daughters, nine grandchildren, and a great grandson.

Iconic Filmmaker Lumet Dead At 86

  • WENN
Iconic Filmmaker Lumet Dead At 86
Legendary director Sidney Lumet has died at the age of 86.

The critically-acclaimed filmmaker passed away on Saturday morning at his New York home after a battle with lymphoma.

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to actor/director Baruch Lumet and dancer Eugenia, he began his career as a child actor, appearing in a number of Broadway plays, including 1935's Dead End and The Eternal Road.

He made his movie debut at the age of 11, in Yiddish short film Papirossen, but halted his acting dreams to serve in the U.S. Army during World War II.

Upon his return, he became involved in Off-Broadway productions as a director, before turning his attentions to TV in the 1950s.

Lumet's extensive small screen credits include hit series Danger, Mama and You Are There, which starred a young Walter Cronkite.

But it was his movie work which really grabbed critics' attention - his first film, 12 Angry Men (1957), featured Henry Fonda as a courageous court juror who manages to convince the panel the defendant on trial for murder is innocent.

Social issues and the topic of morality were key to Lumet's work and he is perhaps best known for 1976 satire Network. The movie, starring William Holden, Peter Finch and Faye Dunaway, garnered a whopping 10 Oscar nominations, including honours for Best Film and Best Director. Network was awarded gold in four categories, with Finch taking Best Actor and Dunaway Best Actress.

He also directed 1962 drama A View From the Bridge, based on the play by Arthur Miller, and Long Day's Journey Into Night, which earned Katharine Hepburn an Oscar nod.

Lumet's other works included Agatha Christie crime classic Murder on the Orient Express in 1974, and he created a fantasy version of his beloved New York for his 1978 musical The Wiz, starring Michael Jackson and Diana Ross. The picture, a take on The Wizard of Oz, was a departure from Lumet's cutting-edge style of filmmaking and was a critical and commercial flop.

His films received a total of 40 Academy Award nominations throughout his career, and his leading stars included Marlon Brando, Paul Newman and Christopher Reeve.

Lumet was presented with the Lifetime Achievement Oscar in 2005.

He is survived by his fourth wife, Mary Gimbel, two daughters, nine grandchildren, and a great grandson.
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

External Sites


Recently Viewed