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The Great Rupert (1950) Poster

Trivia

The stop-motion animation used in creating the illusion of a dancing squirrel (Rupert) was so realistic that director George Pal received many inquiries as to where he got a squirrel that was trained to dance.
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Terry Moore's career was so hectic during this period that she claims that she didn't see this film until over 35 years later when Margie Little, Jimmy Durante's widow, ran a private print for her.
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Jimmy Durante was actually a last-minute addition to the cast. As a result, Terry Moore's billing was dropped from first to second. The script was also modified to allow for Durante-style patter and songs.
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It may be reasonable to assume that the writer chose "Amendola" as actor Jimmy Durante's family's last name, given the movie's subject matter. When the Amendolas felt blessed by money from what they thought was from heaven, indeed, the play on words "Amen Dollar," fits perfectly.
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The $1,500 per week Mr. Dingle is getting from the gold mine would be the equivalent of $14,800 per week in 2015.
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In a self-referential line of dialogue, Amendola remarks that the radio is in the burning house, and he'll miss the Jimmy Durante Show.
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This was reportedly shot in 1948 but not released until 1950. It was later re-released as a holiday film under the title "A Christmas Wish".
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When this was shot in 1948, it became the first film in which Helen Koford was credited as "Terry Moore." The film was not released until 1950 at which time several other movies had been released in which she was credited as Terry Moore.
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This was the first feature-length film for producer George Pal.
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