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Beware, My Lovely (1952) Poster

Trivia

This story was later redone in 1960 on the NBC TV series "Startime," titled "The Man" (the name of the 1950 Mel Dinelli play the movie was based on) it starred Thelma Ritter and Audie Murphy.
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The head of RKO Pictures, Howard Hughes, withheld the film from release for a year. Robert Ryan felt Hughes tried to 'bury' the film because Ryan was publicly active in left-wing politics.
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According to an article in the 15 November 1950 edition of The Hollywood Reporter, Farley Granger was to co-star with Ida Lupino. In the opinion of Eddie Muller on TCM's Noir Alley, Lupino had dynamic chemistry with co-star Robert Ryan in the prior year's On Dangerous Ground (1951) and she probably considered no one else to be her co-star.
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The photo of Mrs. Gordon's (Ida Lupino) deceased husband is actually William Talman, who played Hamilton Burger on the original Perry Mason (1957) series.
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This story was originally done on the CBS radio show Suspense as "To Find Help" on 18 January 1945 with Frank Sinatra as Howard and Agnes Moorehead as Mrs. Gillis (Mrs. Gordon in the film). This was Sinatra's "dramatic debut" on radio. It was successful enough to get a second production in 1949 with Gene Kelly, Ethel Barrymore, and William Conrad.
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In one of the very first scenes where he is cleaning up and calling to Mrs. Warren, the dish sink faucets are leaking; he ignores it as he goes about cleaning the bucket in the wash basin, etc.
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After it's success on the CBS radio show Suspense in two separate productions in 1945 and 1949, Mel Dinelli turned it into a short story entitled "The Man" which was good enough to be included in several 1949 best short story anthologies. Dinelli then transformed it into a three-act play which opened on Broadway at the Fulton Theatre, 210 W. 46th St., on January 19, 1950 and ran for 92 performances. Many stage versions of the play followed around the world. Ida Lupino saw the big-screen potential and bought the movie rights, hiring Dinelli to do the screenplay adaptation. This meant that Dinelli had successfully parlayed one original story into a radio play, short story, stage play and screenplay. It was also later adapted for television a few times by other writers.
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First film directed by Harry Horner, but released after his second film, Red Planet Mars (1952). He had previously worked as an art director and production designer for theater and opera as well as the movies. Although, the credits list RKO's resident art directors, the set design and decor is the work of Horner.
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Produced by the production company "The Filmakers", owned by Ida Lupino and her husband Collier Young.
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The central staircase in Helen Gordon's home was left over from the set of The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) and would be used in many RKO films of the era.
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Helen's boarder, Mr. Armstrong, is played by Taylor Holmes. He had worked with Ida Lupino's father, Stanley Lupino, on the London stage in 1920 and it was his job to keep two-year old Ida from crying.
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