I Love Melvin (1953) - News Poster

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Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher: Television Tributes and Film Specials to Watch

  • Indiewire
Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher: Television Tributes and Film Specials to Watch
You’d be hard-pressed to find a more beloved mother/daughter duo than Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher, who tragically passed away within a day of each other this week: Fisher at the age of 60 on December 27, Reynolds at 84 on the 28th. A bevy of tributes to the two will air over the course of the next month.

Read More: Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher: HBO Mourns With Emotional Emails, While Finding Release Date for Their Mother-Daughter Documentary

Reaction to the painfully sad news was so swift, in fact, that two networks have already honored the departed stars: ABC played an hour-long “20/20” special called “Debbie and Carrie: A Hollywood Love Story” last night, while Logo began its tribute with a “Will & Grace” marathon last night. Reynolds earned an Emmy nomination for playing Debra Messing’s mother on the sitcom, which is currently playing on the channel for three more
See full article at Indiewire »

TCM Sets Debbie Reynolds Marathon: Molly Brown, Singin' and More

TCM Sets Debbie Reynolds Marathon: Molly Brown, Singin' and More
As hoped, TCM (Turner Classic Movies) will pay tribute to the late, great Debbie Reynolds with a marathon of her finest performances, including her Oscar-nominated turn as The Unsinkable Molly Brown.

RelatedDebbie Reynolds Dead at 84, Day After Daughter Carrie Fisher’s Passing

Previously, Logo put together a two-day marathon of Reynolds-centric fare (starting today and including her entire Will & Grace run), while HBO has fast-tracked Bright Lights, a docu about Reynolds and daughter Carrie Fisher, to premiere this Sunday.

Reynolds passed away on Dec. 28, after suffering a stroke in the wake of Fisher’s own death the day prior.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Debbie Reynolds’ 10 Best Moments: IndieWire Staff Pay Tribute to A Star Who Shined on Everything

  • Indiewire
Debbie Reynolds’ 10 Best Moments: IndieWire Staff Pay Tribute to A Star Who Shined on Everything
When Debbie Reynolds died on Wednesday at the age of 84, she had been famous for more than 65 years. A multi-talented star who fixed her place in the Hollywood firmaments when she was just 19 years old (the same age that her daughter, the late Carrie Fisher, was introduced to the world as Princess Leia), Reynolds’ life was the stuff of Tinseltown legend, and she never seemed to grow tired of the spotlight. On the contrary, she was a force of nature until the bitter end, brightening almost every corner of showbiz at one point or another during her decades on stage and screen.

Read More: Debbie Reynolds’ Co-Stars and More Celebrities Mourn Her Passing on Twitter

A hit recording artist, an Oscar (and Tony)-nominated leading lady, a Las Vegas lounge sensation, and a dedicated collector of movie memorabilia (some of her most heroic efforts were dedicated to the preservation of
See full article at Indiewire »

Debbie Reynolds: Her 11 Best Musical Moments on Screen and on Stage

Debbie Reynolds: Her 11 Best Musical Moments on Screen and on Stage
Debbie Reynolds, who died on Wednesday at the age of 84, was one of the last icons of Hollywood’s Golden Age.

Throughout her nearly seven decade career, Reynolds made a name for herself as a triple-threat singer, dancer, and actor — with roles in big-screen MGM musicals and Broadway shows. She was also chart-topping recording artist and dynamic live performer, who toured the country for years as a night club entertainer.

Music was an inescapable part of Reynolds career. Here are 11 of her best musical moments.

“Aba Daba Honeymoon” (1950)

Arthur Fields and Walter Donovan’s “Aba Daba Honeymoon” was first recorded
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Debbie Reynolds Movie Schedule: Singin' In The Rain, Divorce American Style

Jean Hagen, Debbie Reynolds, Singin' in the Rain Debbie Reynolds on TCM: The Unsinkable Molly Brown, The Singing Nun Schedule (Et) and synopses from the TCM website: 6:00 Am The Affairs Of Dobie Gillis (1953) A lovesick teenager searches for romance at college. Dir: Don Weis. Cast: Debbie Reynolds, Bobby Van, Barbara Ruick. Bw-73 mins. 7:15 Am I Love Melvin (1953) A photographer's assistant promises to turn a chorus girl into a cover girl. Dir: Don Weis. Cast: Donald O'Connor, Debbie Reynolds, Una Merkel. C-77 mins. 8:45 Am The Tender Trap (1955) A swinging bachelor finds love when he meets a girl immune to his line. Dir: Charles Walters. Cast: Frank Sinatra, Debbie Reynolds, David Wayne. C-111 mins, Letterbox Format. 10:45 Am Bundle Of Joy (1956) A shop girl is mistaken for the mother of a foundling. Dir: Norman Taurog. Cast: Eddie Fisher, Debbie Reynolds, Adolphe Menjou. C-98 mins. 12:30 Pm Tammy And The Bachelor
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Donald O'Connor
1925-2003

  • WENN
Actor and dancer Donald O'Connor, who wowed audiences with his "Make `Em Laugh" number in the classic musical Singin' in the Rain, died Saturday of heart failure at a retirement home in Calabasas, CA; he was 78. Born to a family of vaudeville performers, O'Connor joined the family profession as an infant and made his film debut at age 11 in the movie 1937's Melody for Two, dancing alongside two of his brothers. Juvenile roles and more vaudeville work followed, and in 1942 he signed on for a number of low-budget musicals for Universal. O'Connor gained a measure of cinematic fame and success as the human star of the first Francis the Talking Mule film, and went on to make five sequels opposite his animal co-star. His show-stopping role in Singin' in the Rain came in 1952, where he played wry musician Cosmo Brown alongside Gene Kelly and Debbie Reynolds. When it came to the now-legendary "Make `Em Laugh" number, O'Connor said he choreographed his pratfalls and acrobatics by seeing what made two female assistants on the set laugh the most; word had it he spent three days in bed after filming the number. Other films in the 50s included I Love Melvin, Call Me Madam, There's No Business Like Show Business and Anything Goes. O'Connor won an Emmy in 1954 for his work on The Colgate Comedy Hour and starred in three different versions of The Donald O'Connor Show. In his later years, O'Connor devoted his energy to composing concert music and making nightclub and stage appearances; he appeared briefly in both Ragtime and Toys and a number of television shows in the 80s and 90s. Always handy with a one-liner, O'Connor saved one of his best for last . according to his family's brief statement, among his last words were, "I'd like to thank the Academy for my lifetime achievement award that I will eventually get." O'Connor is survived by his wife, Gloria Noble, and four children. --Prepared by IMDb staff

Actor and Dancer Donald O'Connor Dies at 78

Actor and Dancer Donald O'Connor Dies at 78
Actor and dancer Donald O'Connor, who wowed audiences with his "Make `Em Laugh" number in the classic musical Singin' in the Rain, died Saturday of heart failure at a retirement home in Calabasas, CA; he was 78. Born to a family of vaudeville performers, O'Connor joined the family profession as an infant and made his film debut at age 11 in the movie 1937's Melody for Two, dancing alongside two of his brothers. Juvenile roles and more vaudeville work followed, and in 1942 he signed on for a number of low-budget musicals for Universal. O'Connor gained a measure of cinematic fame and success as the human star of the first Francis the Talking Mule film, and went on to make five sequels opposite his animal co-star. His show-stopping role in Singin' in the Rain came in 1952, where he played wry musician Cosmo Brown alongside Gene Kelly and Debbie Reynolds. When it came to the now-legendary "Make `Em Laugh" number, O'Connor said he choreographed his pratfalls and acrobatics by seeing what made two female assistants on the set laugh the most; word had it he spent three days in bed after filming the number. Other films in the 50s included I Love Melvin, Call Me Madam, There's No Business Like Show Business and Anything Goes. O'Connor won an Emmy in 1954 for his work on The Colgate Comedy Hour and starred in three different versions of The Donald O'Connor Show. In his later years, O'Connor devoted his energy to composing concert music and making nightclub and stage appearances; he appeared briefly in both Ragtime and Toys and a number of television shows in the 80s and 90s. Always handy with a one-liner, O'Connor saved one of his best for last . according to his family's brief statement, among his last words were, "I'd like to thank the Academy for my lifetime achievement award that I will eventually get." O'Connor is survived by his wife, Gloria Noble, and four children. --Prepared by IMDb staff

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