I Am a Camera (1955) - News Poster

(1955)

News

From Silent Film Icon and His Women to Nazi Era's Frightening 'Common Folk': Lgbt Pride Movie Series (Final)

From Silent Film Icon and His Women to Nazi Era's Frightening 'Common Folk': Lgbt Pride Movie Series (Final)
(See previous post: “Gay Pride Movie Series Comes to a Close: From Heterosexual Angst to Indonesian Coup.”) Ken Russell's Valentino (1977) is notable for starring ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev as silent era icon Rudolph Valentino, whose sexual orientation, despite countless gay rumors, seems to have been, according to the available evidence, heterosexual. (Valentino's supposed affair with fellow “Latin LoverRamon Novarro has no basis in reality.) The female cast is also impressive: Veteran Leslie Caron (Lili, Gigi) as stage and screen star Alla Nazimova, ex-The Mamas & the Papas singer Michelle Phillips as Valentino wife and Nazimova protégée Natacha Rambova, Felicity Kendal as screenwriter/producer June Mathis (The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse), and Carol Kane – lately of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt fame. Bob Fosse's Cabaret (1972) is notable as one of the greatest musicals ever made. As a 1930s Cabaret presenter – and the Spirit of Germany – Joel Grey was the year's Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner. Liza Minnelli
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Awfj Debuts “Wonder Women” List

The Alliance of Women Film Journalists (Awfj) debuts the first in its countdown of the most fascinating, inspiring and singular fictional female characters who have appeared in movies as selected by the Awfj membership. The project, Awfj’s Wonder Women, commemorates the 10th anniversary of the organization’s founding.

Numbers 55-44 as voted by the Awfj membership are Olivia Evans from “Boyhood,” Elle Reid from “Grandma,” Katniss Everdeen from “The Hunger Games” series, Mammy from “Gone with the Wind,” Jean Harrington/Lady Eve Sidwich from “The Lady Eve,” Laine Hanson from “The Contender,” Ada McGrath from “The Piano,” Tess McGill from “Working Girl,” Jane Craig from “Broadcast News,” Lucy Honeychurch from “A Room with a View,” Sally Bowles from “I Am a Camera/Cabaret” and The Bride from “Kill Bill: Vols. 1 & 2.”

The Wonder Women list appends Awfj’s Top 100 Films list, published in June 2007, in response to AFI’s 100 Years.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Cabaret

They say tense sets often make for good movies and Cabaret is no exception. Desperate for a hit after the flop of Sweet Charity, director Bob Fosse rode herd on the cast, especially Joel Grey, who originated the role of the creepy Kit Kat Klub emcee on Broadway but almost lost his Oscar-winning part in the movie to Fosse’s initial choice….Ruth Gordon. At one point Fosse spitefully reduced all Grey’s musical numbers to snippets (the producers put it all back). The finished movie won eight Oscars including Best Director for Fosse and Best Actress for star Liza Minnelli, who never had a better role. Christopher Isherwood’s “Berlin Stories”, which introduced the character of Sally Bowles, had been filmed as a straight drama in 1955 under the title I Am a Camera.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Few Musicals Have Been Nominated for Adapted or Original Screenplay

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor

Into the Woods, Disney’s adaptation of Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine’s Broadway musical, could land an Oscar nomination for its screenplay, which was adapted by Lapine. It may be a stretch for Into the Woods to land in the top five, though. Adapted — or even original — musical screenplays may be discounted for the music in the Oscar race, which might be why few musicals are nominated for adapted or original screenplay. Twelve musicals have been nominated for adapted screenplay since 1929, but 2002’s Chicago was the last musical to do so.

Adapted from Bob Fosse and Fred Ebb’s 1975 musical of the same name, Chicago won six of its 13 nominations, including best picture. It was the first musical since 1968’s Oliver! to win best picture, but its screenplay lost to The Pianist.

Carol Reed’s Oliver! was nominated for 11 Oscars and won five. It
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Interview: Life is a ‘Cabaret’ for Actress Jillian Kate Weingart

Chicago – One of the top musical theater voices working in Chicago is actress/singer Jillian Kate Weingart. After triumphs in several local productions, she is currently featured in the iconic role of Sally Bowles in a staging of “Cabaret,” presented by BrightSide Theatre of Naperville, Ill., through June 29th, 2014.

Jillian Kate Weingart is moving up the musical theater ladder here in Chicago, having had memorable appearances in the locally produced musicals ”A New Brain” and ”Adult Entertainment.” Her characteristic stage energy is electric and sensational, with a multi-range vocal style that can handle the best of Broadway and standard song material.

Jillian Kate Weingart appears in BrightSide Theatre’s ‘Cabaret

Photo credit: JillianWeingart.com

The website Chicago Theatre Review reviewed her performance in “Cabaret” – “Ms. Weingart is the real deal and is alone worth the price of admission.” Jillian Weingart talked to HollywoodChicago.com about taking on one of the
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Audra McDonald sets two records at Tony Awards

Audra McDonald sets two records at Tony Awards
With her win for Best Actress (Play) for her performance as chanteuse Billie Holliday in "Lady Day at Emersons Bar and Grill," Audra McDonald set two new Tony records. This was her sixth victory, breaking a tie with two titans of the stage -- Julie Harris and Angela Lansbury. And she became the first performer to take home Tonys in all four acting categories.   -Break- Join the fiery debate over the Tony Awards going on right now in our red-hot forums Harris won five Best Actress (Play) prizes: "I Am a Camera" (1952), "The Lark" (1956), "Forty Carats" (1969), "The Last of Mrs. Lincoln" (1973) and "The Belle of Amherst" (1977). And she holds the record for most nominations for a performer with 10 nods. Lansbury won Best Actress (Musical) four times -- "Mame" (1966), "Dear World" (1969), "Gypsy" (1975) and "Sweeney Todd" (1979) -- and pi...
See full article at Gold Derby »

​'Gaslight': 7 Everlasting Legacies of the Ingrid Bergman Classic

1. The term "gaslight." The Ingrid Bergman thriller "Gaslight" -- released 70 years ago this week, on May 4, 1944, wasn't the original use of the title. There was Patrick Hamilton's 1938 play "Gas Light," retitled "Angel Street" when it came to Broadway a couple years later. And there was a British film version in 1939, starring Anton Walbrook (later the cruel impresario in "The Red Shoes") and Diana Wynyard.

Still, the glossy 1944 MGM version remains the best-known telling of the tale, with the title an apparent reference to the flickering Victorian lamps that are part of Gregory's (Charles Boyer) scheme to make wife Paula (Bergman) think she's seeing things that aren't there, thus deliberately undermining her sanity in order to have her institutionalized so that he'll be free to ransack the ancestral home to find the missing family jewels.

This version of Hamilton's tale was so popular that it made the word "gaslight"into a verb,
See full article at Moviefone »

Theater Review: Michelle Williams and Alan Cumming Come (Back) to the Cabaret

  • Vulture
Theater Review: Michelle Williams and Alan Cumming Come (Back) to the Cabaret
As originally imagined by the book writer Joe Masteroff and the songwriting team of Kander and Ebb, Cabaret was going to be a naturalistic musical. Loosely based on Christopher Isherwood’s novella Goodbye to Berlin and its subsequent dramatic incarnation as I Am a Camera, it would tell the now-familiar story of Sally Bowles, a not-very-talented English nightclub singer living in “divine decadence” on the precipice of the Nazi calamity. It would also touch on the lives of other Berliners whom Isherwood (called Clifford Bradshaw in the musical) met as an English tutor and lightly fictionalized, including his spinster landlady and her outré tenants. These characters would act and sing in much the same way characters had acted and sung since Show Boat.But somewhere along the way, the director, Hal Prince, had an idea — what we now grandiosely call a concept — that would change not only Cabaret but the
See full article at Vulture »

Body of Evidence

Maria Lassnig MoMA PS1 Through May 25, 2014

"Man is the measure of all things: of things which are, that they are, and of things which are not, that they are not." Protagoras, quoted in Plato's Theaetetus

"Both the motor and sensory homunculi usually appear as a small man superimposed over the top of the precentral or postcentral gyrus, for motor and sensory, respectively. The homunculus is oriented with feet medial and shoulders lateral on top of both the precentral and the postcentral gyrus (for both motor and sensory). The man's head is depicted upside down in relation to the rest of the body such that the forehead is closest to the shoulders. The lips, hands, feet and sex organs have more sensory neurons than other parts of the body, so the homunculus has correspondingly large lips, hands, feet, and genitals. The motor homunculus is very similar to the sensory homunculus, but differs in several ways.
See full article at CultureCatch »

Theatre Review: Marriott’s Too-Clean ‘Cabaret’ Conservatively Mutes Much-Needed Vulgarity

Chicago – It’s “Cabaret” for god’s sake. It’s not “Bambi”. You’re supposed to need to leave the kids at home watching their own Disney flick. You don’t go to McDonald’s to eat healthy just like you don’t go to “Cabaret” for good clean fun.

Play Rating: 3.5/5.0

The show at Chicagoland’s Marriott Theatre starts off with so much potential because of a promise from our Emcee (Stephen Schellhardt). He guarantees we’ll delve into the sketchy world of sin in the Kit Kat Klub where we can put our real-world worries aside. It’s a “what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas” kind of warranty, but you never feel it realized. And that is the show’s biggest downfall.

Stephen Schellhardt as the Emcee in “Cabaret”.

Photo credit: Peter Coombs and the Marriott Theatre

For a moment, I considered that I’ve already “seen
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Hatchet jobs, anonymity and the internet: being a film critic in the 21st century | Mark Kermode

In this extract from his forthcoming book, the Observer's new film critic, Mark Kermode, examines how the internet has changed the role of the professional reviewer. When everyone has an opinion, what value does the critic retain?

"Forrest Gump on a tractor." Those five words are probably my favourite film review ever. More importantly, they constitute the most damaging hatchet job I ever encountered, managing to do something I had often argued was impossible – to kill a movie stone dead. I didn't read them in a newspaper or on a blog, I didn't hear them on the radio or television; rather, they were whispered in my ear by a trusted friend and colleague, David Cox, as the house lights went down on a screening of David Lynch's The Straight Story.

I'd been really looking forward to that movie. I've been a huge Lynch fan ever since being blindsided by
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Broadway Star Julie Harris Dead at 87

Broadway Star Julie Harris Dead at 87
Julie Harris, a Broadway legend and award-winning actress of stage and screen, died Saturday at her Massachusetts home of congestive heart failure, per published reports. She was 87. Harris will be remembered for portraying a wide range of characters, from Sally Bowles in I Am a Camera to Emily Dickinson in The Belle of Amherst, during a theater career that spanned over 60 years. And she sure had the accolades to prove it. Harris won a record five Tony Awards for best actress in a play. She was honored again with a sixth Tony, a special lifetime achievement award in 2002. The only other star to come close was Angela Lansbury, winning four Tonys in the best actress-musical category and one for best...
See full article at E! Online »

Julie Harris obituary

Award-winning actor renowned for her work on Broadway and roles in classic films such as East of Eden and The Haunting

Unable to make sufficient money from her novels, the great American writer Carson McCullers took advice from Tennessee Williams and allowed one of her masterpieces to be adapted for the theatre. The resultant success of The Member of the Wedding (1950) widened her fame, and made a Broadway star of Julie Harris, who has died aged 87.

The play's main character is Frankie Addams, a gawky 12-year-old who longs for companionship and the "we of me". Although the second juvenile role, in what is essentially a three-hander, went to a child actor, Brandon de Wilde, the complex part of Frankie fell to Harris, who was then 24. Born in Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan, and trained at the Yale School of Drama, Harris had made her Broadway debut in It's a Gift in
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Julie Harris obituary

Award-winning actor renowned for her work on Broadway and roles in classic films such as East of Eden and The Haunting

Unable to make sufficient money from her novels, the great American writer Carson McCullers took advice from Tennessee Williams and allowed one of her masterpieces to be adapted for the theatre. The resultant success of The Member of the Wedding (1950) widened her fame, and made a Broadway star of Julie Harris, who has died aged 87.

The play's main character is Frankie Addams, a gawky 12-year-old who longs for companionship and the "we of me". Although the second juvenile role, in what is essentially a three-hander, went to a child actor, Brandon de Wilde, the complex part of Frankie fell to Harris, who was then 24. Born in Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan, and trained at the Yale School of Drama, Harris had made her Broadway debut in It's a Gift in
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Actress Julie Harris Dead At 87; Won Five Tony Awards, Starred In Classic Films

  • CinemaRetro
Harris gave a brilliant performance as a woman who has been targeted by evil spirits in The Haunting (1963)

By Lee Pfeiffer 

Julie Harris, who was regarded as Broadway royalty for winning five Tony Awards (a feat never equaled by any other actress), has passed away at age 87. Harris' career in stage, film and TV spanned almost 60 years. She was the first actress to play Sally Bowles in the original stage adaptation of Christopher Isherwood's I Am a Camera, which recounted the journalist's experiences in Berlin during the fall of the Weimar Republic and the rise of National Socialism. The musical version of the story was later brought to the stage as Cabaret.  Ms. Harris was widely respected throughout the arts and was among those select American performers who was accorded the Kennedy Center Honors. Ms. Harris also appeared in numerous high profile films beginning with his Oscar-nominated performance in
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Julie Harris Dies at 87

Julie Harris Dies at 87
Julie Harris, one of Broadway's most honored performers, whose roles ranged from the flamboyant Sally Bowles in I Am a Camera to the reclusive Emily Dickinson in The Belle of Amherst died Saturday. She was 87. Harris died at her West Chatham, Mass., home of congestive heart failure, actress and family friend Francesca James said. The actress won five Tony Awards for best actress in a play, displaying a virtuosity that enabled her to portray an astonishing gallery of women during a theater career that spanned almost 60 years and included such plays as The Member of the Wedding (1950), The Lark (1955), Forty Carats
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Julie Harris: Broadway Legend Dies At 87

So sad. One of the most decorated stars in Broadway history passed away on Aug. 24 in West Chatham, Mass. She was 87 years old.

Broadway has lost a legend. Julie Harris, who has won more Tony awards than any other actress, died of congestive heart failure in her Massachusetts home on Aug. 24, according to actress and close friend Francesca James.

Julie Harris: Broadway Actress Passes Away

“I’m still in sort of a place of shock,” said Francesca, who had known Julie for over 50 years. “She was, really, the greatest influence in my life.

Julie, who passed at the age of 87, was known for her incredible virtuosity on the stage. She played the flamboyant Sally Bowles in I Am a Camera but also Emily Dickinson in The Belle of Amherst. Though both roles were polar opposites, Julie was able to convincingly and gracefully portray each one.

And her talents did not go unacknowledged.
See full article at HollywoodLife »

Broadway Star Dies At 87

Broadway Star Dies At 87
New York (Associated Press) — Julie Harris, one of Broadway's most honored performers, whose roles ranged from the flamboyant Sally Bowles in "I Am a Camera" to the reclusive Emily Dickinson in "The Belle of Amherst," died Saturday. She was 87.

Harris died at her West Chatham, Mass., home of congestive heart failure, actress and family friend Francesca James said.

Harris won five Tony Awards for best actress in a play, displaying a virtuosity that enabled her to portray an astonishing gallery of women during a theater career that spanned almost 60 years and included such plays as "The Member of the Wedding" (1950), "The Lark" (1955), "Forty Carats" (1968) and "The Last of Mrs. Lincoln" (1972).

She was honored again with a sixth Tony, a special lifetime achievement award in 2002. Her record is up against Audra McDonald, with five competitive Tonys, and Angela Lansbury with four Tonys in the best actress-musical category and one for best supporting actress in a play.
See full article at Huffington Post »

Oscar Nominee, Emmy Winner, Record-Holding Tony Winner Harris Dead

Julie Harris: Best Actress Oscar nominee, multiple Tony winner dead at 87 (photo: James Dean and Julie Harris in ‘East of Eden’) Film, stage, and television actress Julie Harris, a Best Actress Academy Award nominee for the psychological drama The Member of the Wedding and James Dean’s leading lady in East of Eden, died of congestive heart failure at her home in West Chatham, Massachusetts, on August 24, 2013. Harris, born in Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan, on December 2, 1925, was 87. Throughout her career, Julie Harris collected ten Tony Award nominations, more than any other performer. She won five times — a record matched only by that of Angela Lansbury. Harris’ Tony Award wins were for I Am a Camera (1952), The Lark (1956), Forty Carats (1969), The Last of Mrs. Lincoln (1973), and The Belle of Amherst (1977). Harris’ tenth and final Tony nomination was for The Gin Game (1997). In 2002, she was honored with a Special Lifetime Achievement Tony Award.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Julie Harris dies: Broadway star was 87

  • Pop2it
Julie Harris, one of the biggest stars in Broadway history, died on Saturday (Aug. 24) at the age of 87. The actress suffered from congestive heart failure at her home in West Chatham, Massachusetts.

As one of the most honored actors of the 20th century, Harris won five Tony awards for her theater work, in addition to three Emmys and a Grammy. She was also nominated for an Oscar in 1953 for her Lead Actress role in "The Member of the Wedding." Other honors include the National Medal of Arts in 1994 and a Special Lifetime Achievement Tony award in 2002.

Most known for her stage work, Harris has more Tony wins than any other performer. In addition to her Lifetime Achievement award, the actress was honored for her roles in "I Am a Camera," "The Lark," "Forty Carats," "The Last of Mrs. Lincoln" and "The Belle of Amherst." This final play, a one-woman show,
See full article at Pop2it »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed