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Dennis Hopper movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Blue Velvet,’ ‘Easy Rider,’ ‘Hoosiers’

  • Gold Derby
Dennis Hopper movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Blue Velvet,’ ‘Easy Rider,’ ‘Hoosiers’
Dennis Hopper would’ve celebrated his 83rd birthday on May 17, 2019. The Oscar-nominated performer experienced many ups-and-downs throughout his career, with his off-screen antics often overshadowing his onscreen talent. Yet many of his movies have stood the test of time. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of Hopper’s greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1936, Hopper made his movie debut at the age of 19 in “Rebel Without a Cause” (1955), where he became fast friends with James Dean. He had an even bigger role in “Giant” (1956), which would be Dean’s last film before his untimely death in 1955. Hopper struggled for several years trying to find his voice, making small appearances in such films as “Cool Hand Luke” (1967) and “True Grit”(1969).

SEERock Hudson movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

He burst onto the scene with the counterculture phenomenon “Easy Rider” (1969), which he also
See full article at Gold Derby »

Dennis Hopper movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Dennis Hopper movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Dennis Hopper would’ve celebrated his 83rd birthday on May 17, 2019. The Oscar-nominated performer experienced many ups-and-downs throughout his career, with his off-screen antics often overshadowing his onscreen talent. Yet many of his movies have stood the test of time. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of Hopper’s greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1936, Hopper made his movie debut at the age of 19 in “Rebel Without a Cause” (1955), where he became fast friends with James Dean. He had an even bigger role in “Giant” (1956), which would be Dean’s last film before his untimely death in 1955. Hopper struggled for several years trying to find his voice, making small appearances in such films as “Cool Hand Luke” (1967) and “True Grit”(1969).

He burst onto the scene with the counterculture phenomenon “Easy Rider” (1969), which he also directed and co-wrote (with co-star Peter Fonda and Terry Southern
See full article at Gold Derby »

Rock Hudson Biopic ‘All That Heaven Allows’ Moves Ahead at Universal

  • Variety
Universal Pictures, moving ahead with its Rock Hudson biopic “All That Heaven Allows,” is in talks with Richard Lagravenese to write the screenplay.

The studio bought the movie rights last year to Mark Griffin’s “All That Heaven Allows: A Biography of Rock Hudson.” Greg Berlanti is attached to direct and will produce alongside Sarah Schechter for Berlanti Film Corp. and Sherry Marsh for Marsh Productions Entertainment.

Hudson was one of the leading movie stars of the 1950s and ’60s, with credits on “Magnificent Obsession,” “Pillow Talk,” “All That Heaven Allows,” “Send Me No Flowers,” and the James Dean western “Giant,” for which he received an Oscar nomination. Hudson successfully transitioned to television in the ’70s in the long-running series “McMillan & Wife” and “Dynasty.”

He remained discreet about his sexual orientation throughout his life and died of complications from AIDS in 1985.

Berlanti is a prolific television producer with credits on “Dawson’s Creek,
See full article at Variety »

Alfonso Cuaron becomes 92nd Best Director winner, joining Guillermo Del Toro, Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg and…

Alfonso Cuaron becomes 92nd Best Director winner, joining Guillermo Del Toro, Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg and…
Alfonso Cuaron just added another Best Director Oscar to his shelf with his victory for “Roma,” a personal story about growing up in Mexico City in the 1970s. The win came just five years after his first one for “Gravity” (2013). He became the 92nd person in history to clinch that prize, beating out Yorgos Lanthimos (“The Favourite”), Spike Lee (“BlacKkKlansman”), Adam McKay (“Vice”), and Pawel Pawlikowski (“Cold War”). Tour our photo gallery above of every Academy Award winner for Best Director, from the most recent winner to the very first one.

SEE2019 Oscars: Full list of winners (and losers) at the 91st Academy Awards

At the first Academy Awards ceremony in 1927, two awards were given for directing: one for comedy (Lewis Milestone for “Two Arabian Nights”), the other for drama (Frank Borzage for “7th Heaven”). The next year, only one prize was given.

Since 1927, only 21 directors have won this category more than once.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Beyoncé's Royal Surprise to Hugh Jackman's Peak Performance: The Brit Awards Biggest Moments

Beyoncé's Royal Surprise to Hugh Jackman's Peak Performance: The Brit Awards Biggest Moments
Meghan Markle stole the show at the 2019 Brit Awards Wednesday — despite being 3,500 miles away in New York.

The appearance of the Duchess of Sussex in a painting behind Beyonce and Jay-Z drew audible gasps and giggles from the audience as the Carters picked up the award for Best International Group in a pre-recorded video clip.

“Thank you so much to the Brit awards for this incredible honor,” Beyoncé, 37, said to the camera. “You guys have always been so supportive. Everything is love. Thank you.”

Yet the Carters were by no means the only act to leave the audience at London’s O2 Arena gasping.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Alfonso Cuaron is about to join rarified air at the DGA Awards

Alfonso Cuaron is about to join rarified air at the DGA Awards
DGA Award No. 2 is about to make Alfonso Cuaron No. 13. The “Roma” writer/director/cinematographer/editor is the massive favorite to win the Directors Guild of America Award on Saturday, which would propel him onto the short list of two-time champs.

Only 12 people have won the prestigious prize twice, including Cuaron’s good pal Alejandro G. Inarritu, who claimed back-to-back wins for “Birdman” (2014) and “The Revenant” (2015). Steven Spielberg holds the record with three wins, for “The Color Purple” (1985), “Schindler’s List” (1993) and “Saving Private Ryan” (1998).

Cuaron nabbed his first DGA Award for “Gravity” (2013), for which he later won the Best Director Oscar. One of the most accurate Oscar precursors, DGA has lined up with Oscar 63 times in 70 years. Of the two-time DGA winners, thrice has the DGA champ not converted both of their victories into Oscar gold. Francis Ford Coppola lost the Oscar to Bob Fosse (“Cabaret”); Ron Howard was snubbed by Oscar,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Hear Calvin Harris’ Brassy New Song With Rag’n’Bone Man, ‘Giant’

Hear Calvin Harris’ Brassy New Song With Rag’n’Bone Man, ‘Giant’
Calvin Harris recruited soul singer Rag’n’Bone Man for his lush new single “Giant.” The producer blends standard Edm touches – pulsating synths, house beats – with organic flourishes like brass, strings, piano and vocal chants.

Rag’n’Bone Man sings about addiction and redemption throughout the colorful track. “I understood loneliness before I knew what it was/Saw the pills on your table for your unrequited love,” he belts. “I would be nothing without you holding me up/Now I’m strong enough for both us, both of us, both of us,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Eric Roth on What He Learned From William Goldman: ‘Take the Reader by the Heart’

  • Variety
Eric Roth on What He Learned From William Goldman: ‘Take the Reader by the Heart’
Somebody (I think it was my hero Francis Coppola) said the movies that most affect us, the moments that changed us, live on the other side of the moon while we live our lives.

Al Pacino kissing Fredo on the lips. Bob De Niro asking a mirror if it’s talking to him. James Dean discovering oil reaching to the heavens in “Giant.” Those Red Shoes. Burt Lancaster waltzing in Visconti’s “The Leopard.” Mary Badham being told to stand up in “To Kill a Mockingbird” because her father was leaving the room. Kubrick looking beyond Jupiter. All of those emotions and images still exist as the movies play out for the rest of our lives.

And how many of these images that walk around with us are from the imagination and the grandeur of William Goldman. He wrote the book for me, literally, on what a screenplay is, and try as I might,
See full article at Variety »

Rock Hudson movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Giant,’ ‘Pillow Talk,’ ‘Written on the Wind’

  • Gold Derby
Rock Hudson movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Giant,’ ‘Pillow Talk,’ ‘Written on the Wind’
Rock Hudson would’ve celebrated his 93rd birthday on November 17, 2018. The Oscar-nominated actor made a name for himself as a hunky leading man in romantic comedies, melodramas, and adventure flicks. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Hudson spent years as a supporting player and leading man in B-pictures before shooting to stardom in Douglas Sirk‘s soap opera satire “Magnificent Obsession” (1954). Shot in glossy Technicolor with a sweeping musical score, the film was the first of many the actor made with the German-born auteur, including “All That Heaven Allows” (1955), “Written on the Wind” (1956), and “The Tarnished Angels” (1957). Trashed by critics and adored by audiences in their time, these works have found a second life as clever subversions of American values, influencing filmmakers such as Pedro Almodovar and Todd Haynes.

He received his sole Oscar nomination for
See full article at Gold Derby »

Rock Hudson movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Rock Hudson movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best
Rock Hudson would’ve celebrated his 93rd birthday on November 17, 2018. The Oscar-nominated actor made a name for himself as a hunky leading man in romantic comedies, melodramas, and adventure flicks. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Hudson spent years as a supporting player and leading man in B-pictures before shooting to stardom in Douglas Sirk‘s soap opera satire “Magnificent Obsession” (1954). Shot in glossy Technicolor with a sweeping musical score, the film was the first of many the actor made with the German-born auteur, including “All That Heaven Allows” (1955), “Written on the Wind” (1956), and “The Tarnished Angels” (1957). Trashed by critics and adored by audiences in their time, these works have found a second life as clever subversions of American values, influencing filmmakers such as Pedro Almodovar and Todd Haynes.

He received his sole Oscar nomination for
See full article at Gold Derby »

Film Review: Larry Clark’s ‘Marfa Girl 2’

  • Variety
Film Review: Larry Clark’s ‘Marfa Girl 2’
The year 2018 is not what you would call a Larry Clark moment. The director of “Kids,” “Bully,” “Wassup Rockers,” and the new “Marfa Girl 2” — yes, he has made a sequel to a film that virtually no one saw — is now 75 years old, and he may be the cinema’s last shameless mystic of forbidden sexuality. These days, you know you’re watching a Larry Clark film when the sex scenes are real as opposed to simulated, when the close-ups of genitals (mostly male) are multiple and looming and adoring, and when the performers are non-professional actors whose job is to live up to an ideal of skinny hard-bodied youthful tumescence.

That’s been the Larry Clark fetish going back to his two fabled books of transgressive photographs, “Tulsa” (1971) and “Teenage Lust” (1983), and in 50 years of flesh-gazing it hasn’t changed much. Neither has the fundamental controversy that surrounds and
See full article at Variety »

Ang Lee movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Brokeback Mountain,’ ‘Life of Pi’

  • Gold Derby
Ang Lee movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Brokeback Mountain,’ ‘Life of Pi’
Ang Lee celebrates his 64th birthday on October 23, 2018. The Oscar-winning filmmaker has worked in a variety of genres and styles to explore the lives of people around the globe. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in Taiwan in 1954, Lee’s interest in film brought him to NYU’s graduate program, where he worked as a crew member on classmate Spike Lee‘s thesis project, “Joe’s Bed-Stuy Barbershop: We Cut Heads.” He directed his first feature, “Pushing Hands” (1991) at the age of 37.

Lee followed up his debut with back-to-back international successes, each one scoring Oscar nominations as Best Foreign Language Film: “The Wedding Banquet” (1993) and “Eat Drink Man Woman” (1994). In both films, the director explored the kinds of complex familial relationships that would animate many of his stories.

He was then drafted by Hollywood to
See full article at Gold Derby »

Ang Lee movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Ang Lee movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best
Ang Lee celebrates his 64th birthday on October 23, 2018. The Oscar-winning filmmaker has worked in a variety of genres and styles to explore the lives of people around the globe. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in Taiwan in 1954, Lee’s interest in film brought him to NYU’s graduate program, where he worked as a crew member on classmate Spike Lee‘s thesis project, “Joe’s Bed-Stuy Barbershop: We Cut Heads.” He directed his first feature, “Pushing Hands” (1991) at the age of 37.

Lee followed up his debut with back-to-back international successes, each one scoring Oscar nominations as Best Foreign Language Film: “The Wedding Banquet” (1993) and “Eat Drink Man Woman” (1994). In both films, the director explored the kinds of complex familial relationships that would animate many of his stories.

He was then drafted by Hollywood to
See full article at Gold Derby »

Lego Ideas Pop-Up Book officially revealed ahead of November release

Lego has unveiled its Lego Ideas Pop-Up Book (21315) which includes two scenes from the classic fairy tales Little Red Riding Hood and Jack and the Beanstalk. The set goes on sale on November 1st and is priced at $69.99/£59.99; check out the promotional images, video and details here…

21315 Pop-Up Book

Ages 12+. 859 pieces

Us $69.99 – CA $89.99 –De 69.99€ – UK 59.99£ – Fr 69.99€ – Dk 599Dkk – Au $109.99

Enjoy 2 classic fairy tales with this brick-mazing pop-up Lego® book!

Build, play and display the classic fairy tales Little Red Riding Hood and Jack and the Beanstalk with Lego® Ideas 21315 Pop-up Book! This first-ever buildable pop-up book made from Lego bricks opens to reveal the famous scene of grandmother’s forest cottage featuring opening door, bed and kitchen area. Recreate the scene when Little Red Riding Hood meets the wolf or swap out grandmother’s cottage for the scene of the giant’s castle in the clouds. This collectible toy features
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘The Other Side of the Wind’: Posthumous nomination for two-time Oscar winner John Huston?

‘The Other Side of the Wind’: Posthumous nomination for two-time Oscar winner John Huston?
Since 1929, the year of the 2nd Academy Awards, seven performers have earned posthumous Oscar nominations for their work. This year, a legend of the silver screen may join the list of actors recognized for roles following their passing. More than three decades since his death in 1987, John Huston is poised for a posthumous Oscar return with his leading turn in Orson Welles‘ final film, “The Other Side of the Wind.”

This actor, writer, producer and director was no stranger to the Oscars over his illustrious five-decade career in cinema. Between 1940 and 1985, he garnered a total of 15 nominations, including bids in Best Picture, Best Director, Best Supporting Actor, Best Original Screenplay and Best Adapted Screenplay. His pair of victories came in 1948, as he triumphed for his direction and screenwriting on “The Treasure of the Sierra Madre.”

In “The Other Side of the Wind,” which premiered to warm notices at this year’s Venice Film Festival,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Basque Audiovisual in Focus at San Sebastian

  • Variety
San Sebastian — Basque Audiovisual, it’s all there in the name.

A comprehensive brand encompassing companies from across the audiovisual sector of the Basque Country, Basque Audiovisual represents the international interests of local productions from the northern Spanish community.

As some of Europe’s growth is driven not by its biggest markets, but far smaller territories still growing their cinema industries, there are strong indicators that their agenda is paying off.

According to the organization’s head of communication Jara Ayucar, Basque films are not only finding homes in cinemas and on platforms abroad, but featuring in prominent positions at Europe’s most prestigious festivals.

“What we see is that more and more Basque films are competing at international festivals such as Cannes, the Berlinale, Karlovy Vary or Locarno,” she told Variety, adding: “We are showing up on the international map; the stories that our filmmakers tell are increasingly universal and exportable.
See full article at Variety »

David Ladd At "Shane" Screening, Beverly Hills, August 26

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Laemmle’s Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre in Beverly Hills will be presenting a Digital Cinema Package (Dcp) screening of George Stevens’s 1953 film Shane. The 118-minute film, which stars Alan Ladd as the hero and Jack Palance, Ben Johnson, Elisha Cook, Jr., will be screened on Sunday, August 26, 2018 at 3:00 pm.

Please Note: At press time, actor/producer David Ladd (son of actor Alan Ladd) will participate in a Q&A after the screening at the Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre on Sunday, August 26.

From the press release:

Shane (1953)

65th Anniversary Screening

Sunday, August 26, at 3 Pm

Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre

Q&A with David Ladd, Actor-Producer and Son of Alan Ladd

Laemmle Theatres and the Anniversary Classics Series present a 65th anniversary screening of one of the most beloved Westerns of all time, George Stevens’ production of 'Shane.' The 1950s happened to be a golden age for cowboy sagas,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Film News Roundup: ‘Whitney’ Filmmaker Kevin Macdonald Partnering With Docsville

  • Variety
In today’s film news roundup, “Whitney” filmmaker Kevin Macdonald is partnering with Docsville, “Marfa Girl 2” is getting distribution, and a Dave Gurney mystery series is heading into development.

Partnerships

Documentary streaming service Docsville has signed a partnership with “Whitney” filmmaker Kevin Macdonald, Variety has learned exclusively.

Macdonald’s credits include “Touching the Void,” “One Day in September,” “The Last King of Scotland,” the thriller “State of Play,” “How I Live Now,” and the upcoming Whitney Houston documentary “Whitney,” which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival this year.

He won an Academy Award for best documentary in 2000 for “One Day in September,” working with Docsville co-founder Nick Fraser on the film.

“It’s been a joy to work with Kevin over many years, from our collaboration on ‘One Day in September’ up until our most recent efforts with Docsville,” Fraser said. “Having such a talented director on board will surely
See full article at Variety »

Michael Anderson, ‘Logan’s Run’ and ‘Around the World in 80 Days’ Director, Dies at 98

Michael Anderson, ‘Logan’s Run’ and ‘Around the World in 80 Days’ Director, Dies at 98
Michael Anderson, the British filmmaker who directed the 1956 Oscar Best Picture winner “Around the World in 80 Days,” died of heart disease in Canada on April 25, according to a spokesperson for the family. He was 98.

In a career that spanned decades, Anderson also won acclaim for the 1955 WWII film “The Dam Busters,” as well as 1976’s influential sci-fi movie “Logan’s Run,” about a dystopian future in which everyone is killed off when they reach the age of 30.

The son of an actor, Anderson landed small acting roles in his teens, and then worked as an office boy and later assistant director at London’s Elstree Studios on films like “Pygmalion” and Noel Coward’s “In Which We Serve,” the Times of London reported.

Also Read: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2018 (Photos)

He served in the Royal Signals Corps in WWII, then returned to the British film industry. “The Dam Busters,” starring Michael Redgrave and Richard Todd as British airmen who help devise an effective system of aerial bombing, won critical raves for its accuracy — and earned an Oscar nomination for special effects.

The success of “The Dam Busters” led Anderson to Hollywood — and the epic scale of “Around the World in 80 Days,” with its star-studded cast, 110 locations and 68,000 extras. The film got middling reviews but was a giant hit, winning five Oscars. (Anderson himself lost to George Stevens for “Giant.”)

Also Read: Ryan Gosling to 'Logan's Run,' Dominic Cooper biting into 'Vampire Hunter'

He followed that success with films like 1965’s “Operation Crossbow,” 1966’s “The Quiller Memorandum” and 1968’s “The Shoes of the Fishermen.”

In the ’70s, Anderson drifted from action thrillers into science fiction with the 1976 hit “Logan’s Run,” starring Michael York. Four years later, he directed Rock Hudson in a TV miniseries adaptation of Ray Bradbury’s “The Martian Chronicles.”

Read original story Michael Anderson, ‘Logan’s Run’ and ‘Around the World in 80 Days’ Director, Dies at 98 At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Oscars 2018: Will Best Picture and Best Director line up for the first time since ‘Birdman’?

Oscars 2018: Will Best Picture and Best Director line up for the first time since ‘Birdman’?
It used to be pretty much an Academy Awards norm that the film that won Best Picture also took home the Oscar for Best Director. In recent years that has changed, largely due to the preferential ballot that has been implemented for Best Picture voting. These two categories have split in four of the past five years, with “Birdman” (2014) and its director Alejandro G. Inarritu being the last time they lined up. Currently “The Shape of Water” is in first place to win both categories on Gold Derby’s Oscar charts, so might things get back on track this year?

See 2018 Oscar nominations: Full list of Academy Awards nominees in all 24 categories

A year ago Damien Chazelle won Best Director for “La La Land” while “Moonlight” took Best Picture, becoming the fourth time this decade that the Oscar split occurred. In 2015 Inarritu won Best Director for “The Revenent” (his second
See full article at Gold Derby »
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