Edge of the City (1957) - News Poster

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‘A Raisin in the Sun’: Sidney Poitier Faces the Strains of a Segregated World

Lorraine Hansberry is sometimes lost in the shuffle of famous playwrights, which is quite a shame considering she was the first African American writer to have work produced on Broadway. While only a few of her plays made it to the stage due to her young and untimely death, Hansberry utilized her writing to help the Civil Rights artistic movement, specifically with her hit Broadway show A Raisin in the Sun. Starring Ruby Dee, Sidney Poitier, Diana Sands (all three of whom reprised their roles on screen), among others, the play centers on an African American family struggling with being swallowed by racism in their everyday lives. The show became so popular that Columbia Pictures adapted it for the screen with Hansberry writing the script. Despite the issues that can often come when adapting from stage to screen, Hansberry and company manage to create a space for their actors to
See full article at The Film Stage »

No Down Payment

The blacklist strikes back as both writer Ben Maddow and director Martin Ritt examine the booming ’50s phenomenon of The Suburbs. No money up front will get you into an ‘estate’ of your dreams, provided you’re white. Possibly a little too direct in its messaging of sickness in the American dream, much of what we see in the ticky-tacky subdivision of Sunrise Hills will ring true to those of us who lived it.

No Down Payment

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1957 / B&W / 2:35 widescreen / 101 min. / Street Date April 17, 2018 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store / 29.95

Starring: Joanne Woodward, Sheree North, Tony Randall, Jeffrey Hunter, Cameron Mitchell, Patricia Owens, Barbara Rush, Pat Hingle, Robert H. Harris, Aki Aleong, Charles Herbert, Mimi Gibson.

Cinematography: Joseph Lashelle

Film Editor: Lois R. Loeffler

Original Music: Leigh Harline

Written by Philip Yordan, front for Ben Maddow; from the book by John McPartland

Produced by Jerry Wald
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

NYC Weekend Watch: Kung Fu, Sidney Poitier, The Maysles, Chantal Akerman & More

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

The “Old School Kung Fu Fest” comes to the Lower East Side this weekend, offering the likes of Sammo Hung, Jackie Chan, Bruce Lee, and Tsui Hark, among others.

A print of My Neighbor Totoro screens on Saturday morning.

Frederick Wiseman‘s Hospital begins a week-long run.

A restoration of The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari screens this Monday.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Sidney Poitier to be honoured with BAFTA Fellowship

  • ScreenDaily
Sidney Poitier to be honoured with BAFTA Fellowship
Pioneering actor to receive BAFTA’s highest honour.

BAFTA is to honour Us actor Sidney Poitier with its Fellowship honour at the Ee British Academy Film Awards in London on Feb 14.

Awarded annually, the Fellowship is the highest accolade bestowed by BAFTA upon an individual in recognition of an outstanding and exceptional contribution to film, television or games.

Fellows previously honoured for their work in film include Charlie Chaplin, Alfred Hitchcock, Steven Spielberg, Sean Connery, Elizabeth Taylor, Stanley Kubrick, Anthony Hopkins, Laurence Olivier, Judi Dench, Vanessa Redgrave, Christopher Lee, Martin Scorsese, Alan Parker and Helen Mirren. Mike Leigh received the Fellowship at last year’s Film Awards.

Poitier said: “I am extremely honored to have been chosen to receive the Fellowship and my deep appreciation to the British Academy for the recognition.”

The pioneering actor’s award-winning career includes six BAFTA nominations, including one BAFTA win for The Defiant Ones (1958), and a British Academy Britannia Award for Lifetime
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Screen legend and civil rights activist Ruby Dee passes away at 91

  • Hitfix
Award-winning star of stage and screen and noted civil rights activist Ruby Dee died at her home in New Rochelle, New York on Wednesday. She was 91. She died of natural causes, according to her representative Michael Livingston, as reported by CNN and other news outlets.  Born in Cleveland in October 27, 1922 and raised in Harlem, Dee appeared in several Broadway plays in the '40s before her big screen breakthrough in 1950's "The Jackie Robinson Story," and she continued to appear in films, on TV and on stage in a career which lasted nearly 70 years.  Often appearing alongside her husband Ossie Davis, Dee drew acclaim in films such as 1957's "Edge of the City" and 1961's "A Raisin in the Sun" (both opposite Sidney Poitier) and played a small but pivotal role in Spike Lee's quintessential 1989 film "Do the Right Thing." She also co-starred in ABC's 1994 adaptation of Stephen King's "The Stand.
See full article at Hitfix »

Ruby Dee, Actress & Civil Rights Pioneer, Dies At 91

Actress and pioneer of the civil rights movement Ruby Dee died on Wednesday at her home in New Rochelle, N.Y. She was 91.

Ruby Dee Dies

Dee began her lengthy career on the stage, working steadily on Broadway during the 40s. She appeared in 12 shows during the decade, including South Pacific (1943), Walk Hard (1944), Arsenic and Old Lace (1946) and John Loves Mary (1946).

The Jackie Robinson Story in 1950 was Dee’s breakout film, in which she played Rae Robinson. She went on to play Ruth Younger in the A Raisin in the Sun movie, and appear in a number of other films, including Edge of the City, Gone Are the Days , The Incident and Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing. She received an Oscar nomination for her work in 2007’s American Gangster alongside Denzel Washington.

Dee was also a constant presence on the small screen, making appearances on a number of TV series.
See full article at Uinterview »

It’s Not TV: HBO, The Company That Changed Television: The Wasteland

The Wasteland:

Television is a gold goose that lays scrambled eggs;

and it is futile and probably fatal to beat it for not laying caviar.

Lee Loevinger

When people argue over the quality of television programming, both sides — it’s addictive crap v. underappreciated populist art — seem to forget one of the essentials about commercial TV. By definition, it is not a public service. It is not commercial TV’s job to enlighten, inform, educate, elevate, inspire, or offer insight. Frankly, it’s not even commercial TV’s job to entertain. Bottom line: its purpose is simply to deliver as many sets of eyes to advertisers as possible. As it happens, it tends to do this by offering various forms of entertainment, and occasionally by offering content that does enlighten, inform, etc., but a cynic would make the point that if TV could do the same job televising fish aimlessly swimming around an aquarium,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Husbands – review

John Cassavetes died in 1989 at the age of 59, having acted in a number of extremely popular mainstream movies (Martin Ritt's Edge of the City, Robert Aldrich's The Dirty Dozen, Roman Polanski's Rosemary's Baby and Brian De Palma's The Fury), which helped subsidise the freewheeling, semi-improvised independent films on which his reputation ultimately rests. The best of these perhaps, and the least improvised, is A Woman Under the Influence (1974), for which he (as director) and his wife Gena Rowlands (as best actress) received Oscar nominations. Most characteristic is Husbands (1970), a much derided study of three well-heeled New Yorkers (Cassavetes, Peter Falk and Ben Gazzara) experiencing a shared midlife crisis and confronting the emptiness of their lives following a fourth friend's early death. After the funeral they take off on a drunken, truth-seeking spree in New York and London.

The result is highly uneven, painfully drawn-out, deeply sincere,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Remember Me: Ernest Borgnine

When the drama Marty won the Academy Award for the Best Picture of 1955, it was a win of many wins, and not just because the movie walked off with three other Oscars.

It signaled that the balance of creative power in Hollywood was shifting; that the monopoly of the major studios was fading, and that a new breed of independent companies – often formed with or by the stars who had, at one time, been held in bondage to the majors under long-term contracts – were serious player in the industry (Marty had been produced by Hecht-Lancaster which had been formed by Burt Lancaster and producer Harold Hecht).

It was a victory for a new kind of anti-Hollywood storytelling; unglamorous tales about unglamorous people, real people. Postwar Italian neo-realism had demonstrated the power of the drama of everyday people just trying to get through a day, and Marty and other films like
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Four Uniquely American Directors

Every year during the Fourth of July, American cable and movie channels never fail to make an effort to run a slate of films perceived as ideal in representing the American brand. These range from war movies dripping with nostalgia and patriotism to pop culture pieces sympathetic to American history and ideals to macho action movies dedicated to American exceptionalism. But with every showing of The Patriot, Yankee Doodle Dandy, or Independence Day, the question becomes more and more pressing, what is an American film? Perhaps more specifically, what is an American director?

To be fair, any number of directors could be classified as quintessentially American. There is the shining humanism of John Ford, the political posturing and questioning of Oliver Stone and Michael Moore, even the capitalist excess of Michael Bay. Below are four directors that may not immediately come to mind as proto typically American filmmakers. The films
See full article at SoundOnSight »

[DVD Review] Sidney Poitier Collection

Some might initially be disappointed by the lineup of the Sidney Poitier Collection. Most of Poitier's landmark films were released by United Artists or Columbia Pictures (In the Heat of the Night, A Raisin in the Sun, Lilies in the Field, The Defiant Ones, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, To Sir, With Love, etc.). And since this is a Warner Bros. package, one could feel inclined to pass it up and hope for a different set to be released in the future. But while two of the films included in this collection lack greatness, the other two belong in the library of any avid film lover, whether you like Poitier or not (but who doesn't?). And since all of these films were difficult (if not impossible) to find on DVD before now, it's worth the purchase. Reviews of the four films follow:

Something Of Value

A dramatization of the real
See full article at JustPressPlay »

[DVD Review] Sidney Poitier Collection

Some might initially be disappointed by the lineup of the Sidney Poitier Collection. Most of Poitier's landmark films were released by United Artists or Columbia Pictures (In the Heat of the Night, A Raisin in the Sun, Lilies in the Field, The Defiant Ones, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, To Sir, With Love, etc.). And since this is a Warner Bros. package, one could feel inclined to pass it up and hope for a different set to be released in the future. But while two of the films included in this collection lack greatness, the other two belong in the library of any avid film lover, whether you like Poitier or not (but who doesn't?). And since all of these films were difficult (if not impossible) to find on DVD before now, it's worth the purchase. Reviews of the four films follow:

Something Of Value

A dramatization of the real
See full article at JustPressPlay »

See also

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