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‘Exorcist’ Star Max Von Sydow Doesn’t Let Age Define His Roles

  • Variety
‘Exorcist’ Star Max Von Sydow Doesn’t Let Age Define His Roles
Max von Sydow turned 90 this month, which is a milestone for most people, but age has always seemed incidental to the actor. When he played the elderly, frail Father Merrin in “The Exorcist,” von Sydow was 44 — meaning he was the same age Bradley Cooper is today.

In the 1950s, von Sydow had his big breakthrough in a trio of Ingmar Bergman films — “The Seventh Seal,” “Wild Strawberries” and “The Magician” — while still in his 20s, but with the wisdom and sadness of the world in his eyes. Von Sydow has appeared in such fan favorites as “Game of Thrones,” “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” “Rush Hour 3” and David Lynch’s “Dune.” But to most, he’s synonymous with his 11 films for Bergman and “The Exorcist.” In A.D. Murphy’s enthusiastic Variety review of the latter on Dec. 24, 1973, he said of von Sydow, “His performance is one of controlled dedication.
See full article at Variety »

Rushes: Cannes Honors Agnès Varda, "The Rise of Skywalker," Claire Denis

  • MUBI
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSThe Cannes Film Festival has announced its official poster, a tribute to the late Agnès Varda. The poster depicts Varda on the set of her very first feature, La pointe courte (1955). We are saddened by the news that the brilliant Swedish actress Bibi Andersson died at the age of 83. Best known for her remarkable turns in The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries, and Persona, Ronald Bergan provides a thorough obituary of the timeless artist for The Guardian.Recommended VIEWINGThe first teaser for J.J. Abrams conclusion to the new Star Wars trilogy, Episode IX: The Rise Of Skywalker. We published an extensive 5-part dialogue conducted last year that wrestles with George Lucas's much contested prequels.Kino Lorber's trailer for the re-release of Frank Simon's The Queen (1968), a documentary about the Miss All-America Camp Beauty Contest,
See full article at MUBI »

A tribute to the late, great Bibi Andersson

Tom Jolliffe pays tribute to the late, great Bibi Andersson

Cinephiles around the world were saddened by the recent passing of the magnetic Bibi Andersson. Those versed in Swedish cinema will certainly know well of her work. To the uninitiated, to surmise succinctly, the Swedish actress worked solidly for roughly 60 years.

Andersson will always be most associated with Ingmar Bergman. Bergman, one of cinemas great directors, and certainly the foremost film-maker to come out of Northern Europe, was known to have a select group of favoured actors. Along with the likes of Max Von Sydow, Liv Ullman, Hariet Anderson and Erland Josephson, Andersson starred in several of the directors films. She notably appeared in some of his most iconic works including Wild Strawberries and The Seventh Seal. More on her most revered partnership with Bergman later.

Andersson also worked with John Huston in The Kremlin Letter and Robert Altman in Quintet.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Links: Madame X, Shelley Winters, and Martha Again

Link roundup starting with News articles...

• Nyt The great Swedish actress Bibi Andersson, a Bergman regular dies at 83

• Cartoon Brew Rich Moore, who delivered the Wreck It Ralph movies for Disney leaves to run Sony Animation

• Deadline Gabriel Basso nabs lead in Ron Howard's movie adaptation of bestseller Hillbilly Elegy. Amy Adams and Glenn Close co-star.

• The Wrap talks to Ryan O'Connell, the creator and star of the gay & disabled sitcom Special on Netflix

Lots more after the jump including In the Heights, Bond 25, the influence of Big, new albums, declining sex in the cinema, and two must-reads online this past week in case you missed them...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Bibi Andersson obituary

Actor of great depth and complexity known for her roles in the films of Ingmar Bergman

It is often the fate of any actor who worked regularly for the illustrious Swedish director Ingmar Bergman to be celebrated, above all, for that association. Among this elite ensemble, Bibi Andersson, who has died aged 83, appeared in 10 features and three television films by Bergman, which included such masterpieces as The Seventh Seal (1957), Wild Strawberries (1957) and Persona (1966).

With Persona, Andersson became internationally recognised as a performer capable of great depth and complexity. Playing Nurse Alma, taking care of Elizabet Vogler (Liv Ullmann), a famous actor stricken with psychosomatic loss of speech, at a remote seaside cottage, Andersson has to deliver most of the dialogue of the film. The spiritual anguish is written on the features of the two leads as they begin to understand one another and exchange identities.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Bibi Andersson obituary

Actor of great depth and complexity known for her roles in the films of Ingmar Bergman

It is often the fate of any actor who worked regularly for the illustrious Swedish director Ingmar Bergman to be celebrated, above all, for that association. Among this elite ensemble, Bibi Andersson, who has died aged 83, appeared in 10 features and three television films by Bergman, which included such masterpieces as The Seventh Seal (1957), Wild Strawberries (1957) and Persona (1966).

With Persona, Andersson became internationally recognised as a performer capable of great depth and complexity. Playing Nurse Alma, taking care of Elizabet Vogler (Liv Ullmann), a famous actor stricken with psychosomatic loss of speech, at a remote seaside cottage, Andersson has to deliver most of the dialogue of the film. The spiritual anguish is written on the features of the two leads as they begin to understand one another and exchange identities.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Bibi Andersson, the Great Swedish Actress Known for Her Roles in Ingmar Bergman’s Films, Was a Sunflower Who Saw the Darkness

  • Variety
Bibi Andersson, the Great Swedish Actress Known for Her Roles in Ingmar Bergman’s Films, Was a Sunflower Who Saw the Darkness
Seen from the vantage of 2019, the extraordinary actresses who came to prominence in the films of Ingmar BergmanHarriet Andersson, Liv Ullmann, Ingrid Thulin, and the sunny and anguished, incandescent and heartbreaking Bibi Andersson, who died Sunday — enjoyed a relationship with their director that was rooted in a 20th-century male-gaze ethos. Bergman was famously obsessed with these women: with their faces, their personae, the dramatic possibilities they opened up to him. He carried on off-screen romantic relationships with most of them (including Bibi Andersson), and in his movies he placed them on a grand pedestal of extravagant expression. The pedestal was framed not with a medium or long shot but with a starkly penetrating close-up. You could say that Bergman used the camera to probe their very being.

Yet it may be the essence of the partnership between Bergman, the mythical art-house giant, and the actresses he turned into psychodramatic
See full article at Variety »

Bibi Andersson, ‘Persona,’ ‘The Seventh Seal’ Actress, Dies at 83

  • Variety
Bibi Andersson, ‘Persona,’ ‘The Seventh Seal’ Actress, Dies at 83
Bibi Andersson, the Swedish actress who starred in 13 Ingmar Bergman films, died Sunday in Stockholm. She was 83.

Director Christina Olofson confirmed her death to several outlets. Andersson had suffered a stroke in 2009 and was hospitalized.

Andersson made a name herself after her type-defying role in 1966’s “Persona,” for which she received the award for best actress at the 4th Guldbagge Awards, the Swedish equivalent of the Academy Awards. Previous to the role, she was generally cast in more innocent parts, like in “The Seventh Seal” and “Wild Strawberries.”

Andersson won the silver bear for best actress as the Berlin Film Festival in 1963 for her work in Vilgot Sjöman’s “The Mistress” and in 1968, she was nominated for best foreign actress at the BAFTAs for her roles in both “Persona” and “Syskonbädd 1782.” After her “Persona” fame, she went on to work consistently throughout the ’60s and ’70s and accumulated roles in more than 50 films,
See full article at Variety »

Bibi Andersson, ‘The Seventh Seal’ and ‘Persona’ Actress, Dies at 83

  • The Wrap
Bibi Andersson, ‘The Seventh Seal’ and ‘Persona’ Actress, Dies at 83
Swedish actress Bibi Andersson, known for her roles in “The Seventh Seal” and “Persona,” died on Sunday, according to Stockholm newspaper Aftonbladet. She was 83.

“She has been sick for many years, but it is sad. I found out that Bibi passed away lunchtime today,” director and friend Christina Olofsson told Aftonbladet.

According to Aftonbladet, Andersson had a stroke in 2009 while living in France with her husband Gabriel Mora Baeza. She returned to Sweden a few days later for hospital care. Shortly thereafter, she moved to a nursing home in Stockholm.

Andersson, who starred in several of writer and director Ingmar Bergman’s classic films, became well-known in the 1950’s, appearing in “The Seventh Seal” and “Wild Strawberries,” among countless other films.

She would go on to work constantly throughout the ’60s, ’70s and subsequent decades and as recently
See full article at The Wrap »

Oscars long love affair with foreign language films

Oscars long love affair with foreign language films
There are a lot of Oscar firsts surrounding Alfonso Cuaron’s acclaimed Mexican drama, “Roma.” History will be made if it wins Best Picture and Best Foreign Language Film, as well as being the first movie in Spanish and Mixtec languages to take home the top Academy Award.

With history “Roma” on the cusp of rewriting the Oscar history book, let’s look back at some foreign language Oscar firsts.

The first foreign film to earn an Oscar nomination was Rene Clair’s delightful French satire “A Nous La Liberte” for Best Art Drection in the ceremony’s fifth year.

It was 80 years ago that the academy nominated a foreign-language film for the Best Picture Oscar when Jean Renoir’s anti-war masterpiece “Grand Illusion,” was one of 10 nominees for the top prize. Though the film lost to Frank Capra’s “You Can’t Take It With you,” the French drama
See full article at Gold Derby »

Criterion Collection: Sawdust and Tinsel (1953) | Blu-ray Review

As John Simon’s insert essay “The Lower Depths” asserts in Criterion’s Blu-ray re-release of Ingmar Bergman’s 1953 masterpiece Sawdust and Tinsel, the title was something of a turning point for the Swedish cinematic titan, who had yet to claim the international reputation he would soon come to be known for. Previous titles Summer Interlude (1951) and Waiting Women (1953) had recently found Bergman compete for Venice’s Golden Lion, and while 1947’s A Ship to India had been part of the Cannes program, it was 1955’s Smiles of a Summer Night which gave him his first crack at the Palme d’Or, while 1957’s Wild Strawberries would take home the Golden Bear in Berlin.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

The Most Under-Appreciated Movies of 2018

  • Variety
The Most Under-Appreciated Movies of 2018
Some were launched with mega-hype, only to wind up branded as financial disappointments. Others were indie-produced Cinderellas that got lost on their way to the ball. And one was a legendary film maudit that appears well on its way to becoming a footnote.

What do they all have in common? Their inclusion on this list of the Ten Most Underrated Movies of 2018.

“Blaze”

Despite a strong Sundance sendoff and scads of glowing reviews for his labor-of-love directorial effort, Ethan Hawke couldn’t get many ticketbuyers to share his deep regard for Blaze Foley (1949-89), a relatively obscure figure in the Outlaw Country movement who remains best known for a handful of songs recorded by other, more famous artists. Those who did join Hawke on his detour off the beaten track couldn’t help admiring his avoidance of traditional musical biopic clichés and conventions, and appreciate musician-turned-actor Benjamin Dickey’s raw
See full article at Variety »

‘Searching for Ingmar Bergman’ Film Review: Margarethe von Trotta Explores Her Love of Swedish Auteur’s Work

  • The Wrap
‘Searching for Ingmar Bergman’ Film Review: Margarethe von Trotta Explores Her Love of Swedish Auteur’s Work
In the category of culture-driven documentaries that focus on film history, a particularly enjoyable subset of that subset is the kind made by noteworthy artists themselves. There’s Martin Scorsese waxing luxuriously on Italian cinema (“My Voyage to Italy”), Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow fanboy-interviewing Brian DePalma for “DePalma,” and now, German filmmaker Margarethe von Trotta (“Hannah Arendt”) taking us on a personal tour of her lifelong admiration for Sweden’s hallowed grandmaster in the playfully inquisitive “Searching for Ingmar Bergman.”

Von Trotta’s connection to Bergman started when she was a young, New Wave-enamored film lover who responded deeply to his 1957 chess-with-Death masterpiece “The Seventh Seal”; she even opens her valentine of a documentary visiting its famed rocky beach setting, narrating the impact of its establishing shots.

When she blossomed as an artist herself as part of West Germany’s own exciting crush of post-war filmmaking talent alongside
See full article at The Wrap »

A Beginner’s Guide to Ingmar Bergman

Tom Jolliffe offers a beginner’s guide to the work of Ingmar Bergman

To know Ingmar Bergman’s work is to understand a director who has impacted cinema as greatly as anyone. A true master by any measure of directorial influence, he’s a man whose work is iconic, even to the unbeknown who’ve never seen his films. A cinematic image as famous as any, sees a man pitted in a game of chess against the grim reaper. An image which has been mocked and spoofed many times. That image coming from perhaps his most widely known film (indeed because of that one image), The Seventh Seal.

Bergman’s films to a modern audience may seem unapproachable. A read of any Bergman synopsis will often seem as though you’re in for a grim old time, but even in the darkest subjects he touches upon, there’s a visual
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Criterion Collection Announces 39-Film Ingmar Bergman Box Set

Tomorrow is the centenary of the birth of one of cinema’s greatest directors, Ingmar Bergman, and to celebrate, The Criterion Collection has announced of their most expansive releases ever. This November, they will release Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema, a 39-film box set comprising nearly all of his work, including 18 films never before released by Criterion. Curated akin to a film festival, the set features Opening, Centerpiece, and Closing Films, with many double features in between. The set also features 11 introductions and over five hours of interviews with the director himself, six making-of documentaries, a 248-page book, and much more.

As we await for its November 20 release, check out an overview from Criterion below, as well as the box art, the trailer, and the full list of films, in curated order. One can also see much more about each release and the special features on the official site.

With the
See full article at The Film Stage »

Bergman Centennial: Winter Light (1963) and the echo of First Reformed (2018)

Team Experience will be celebrating one of the world's most acclaimed auteurs for the next week for the 100th anniversary of Ingmar Bergman's birth. Here's Sean Donovan...

Perhaps none of Ingmar Bergman’s films do more to conjure clichés of what a ‘Bergman film’ is than 1963’s Winter Light. While Persona is undoubtedly the cinephile consensus choice for his best film, and The Seventh Seal or Wild Strawberries are his most widely-seen, frequently adorning college syllabi about the history of European cinema, the morose sadness for which his work became known feels most exemplarily expressed in Winter Light. The second part of a trilogy about “the silence of God” (starting out grim already), Winter Light’s infinite quiet, stark black-and-white cinematography, freezing cold exteriors, and tear-soaked monologues scream Bergman in capital letters. It’s strange viewing with which to start a hot summer weekday morning, but here we are.
See full article at FilmExperience »

When You Need To Watch A Film Twice

Tom Jolliffe looks at when you need to watch a film a second time to fully appreciate it…

A couple of days ago one of my Flickering Myth brethren Neil Calloway wrote a piece about watching classic films for the first time and finding them boring. The piece certainly got a reaction, from no less than Ron Perlman. In particular it seemed to be a lack of glowing praise for The Godfather that incurred some internet (and Hellboy) scorn. As with any film fan, Neil’s entitled to his opinion, but it got me thinking. Thinking back to the first time I watched The Godfather. Like my colleague, I did so fully knowing its reputation.

My first viewing left me slightly underwhelmed. I liked it, but it’s long. It’s slow. From about half way in I’d been locked down in the figure four leg lock, it certainly had me.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Ingmar Bergman’s Centennial: A Time to Celebrate Joy of Filmmaking

Ingmar Bergman’s Centennial: A Time to Celebrate Joy of Filmmaking
July 14 marks the 100th birthday of writer-director Ingmar Bergman, whom Variety declared on Nov. 24, 1954, to be “Sweden’s top director.” Within three years, Bergman went beyond that: He was recognized as one of the top filmmakers in the entire world, thanks to the 1957 duo of “The Seventh Seal” and “Wild Strawberries.” A year later, Carl Dymling, president of Sweden’s leading production unit Svensk Filmindustri, told Variety that “Seventh Seal” marked a new era in moviemaking: “Bergman uses the film much as an author does his book. As a rule, one can’t afford to be too explicit about one’s own feelings in making a picture. But Bergman does it.” The director made global stars of Liv Ullmann and Max von Sydow and inspired young filmmakers around the world for decades with his tales of existential crisis, the tenderness and brutality between individuals, and the pleasures and insanity of sex.
See full article at Variety »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Bergman — A Year in a Life’

  • Variety
We tend to think of film directors as generals, a cliché that’s useful, and accurate, as far as it goes. Yet compared to almost any other vocation, the essence of what it means to be a film director — especially if you’re a serious and powerful artist — is that you occupy a dozen roles at once. You’re a politician, an acting coach, a therapist, a budget manager, an image technician, a literary dramatist, a back-room manipulator, a dictator, and (when you need to be) everyone’s best friend. Not to mention the things that often go with the job: a media star, a sexual hound dog, and a workaholic.

When you see a typical documentary about a filmmaker, much of this stuff often ends up on the cutting-room floor. But Jane Magnusson’s “Bergman — A Year in a Life,” a portrait of Ingmar Bergman in the pivotal year
See full article at Variety »

Cannes 2018: Agnès Varda Film to Screen in Classics Program, Cinéfondation Jury Is 60% Female

Varda’s “One Sings, the Other Doesn’t” will be featured in Cannes Classics

Cannes has announced another program for its 2018 edition. Featuring iconic movies and works from renowned filmmakers, the Cannes Classics category is a celebration of the history of film. The fest also unveiled the Cinéfondation Jury, the panel that will award Cannes’ short film prizes. Three of the five jury members, or 60 percent, are women.

Filmmakers Valeska Grisebach (“Western”) and Alanté Kavaïté (“The Summer of Sangaile”), and actress Ariane Labed (“Mary Magdalene”) will serve on the Cinéfondation Jury. They and their fellow Jury members will select the fest’s Short Film Palme d’or winner as well as the three Cinéfondation Prize recipients. The Short Films Competition includes two women-helmed shorts and Cinéfondation — which showcases students’ short films — features eight women-helmed projects. The Short Film Palme d’or will be awarded during Cannes’ Closing Ceremony on May
See full article at Women and Hollywood »
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