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Film Review: Furie (2019) by Le Van Kiet

Men and women with “a particular set of skills” really need to learn to beef up the security around their family and loved ones! After several such kidnappings that, in afterthought, turn out to be a bad deal for the antagonists, including that of Ma Dong-seok’s wife in “Unstoppable” last year, this time it is Vietnamese superstar Veronica Ngo who has her daughter snatched from her in director Le Van Kiet’s “Furie”. The film made history by becoming the first Vietnamese film to receive a wide release in United States.

“Furie” is screening at New York Asian Film Festival

Hai Phuong is a mysterious resident of a quiet fishing village in the Vietnamese countryside. A martial arts expert, who has moved to the village not too long ago with her clever school-going daughter Mai. Money is hard to come by as Hai works as a debt collector for
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Film at Lincoln Center and New York Asian Film Foundation Announces Full Lineup for The 18th New York Asian Film Festival

New York, NY – Film at Lincoln Center and the New York Asian Film Foundation announce the 18th edition of the New York Asian Film Festival (Nyaff), June 28 – July 14, 2019.

After last year’s Savage Seventeen, this year’s program is dubbed the “Still Too Young to Die” edition with five international premieres, 23 North American premieres, four U.S. premieres, and eight New York premieres, showcasing the most exciting action, comedy, drama, thriller, romance, horror, and art-house films from East Asia, and bringing close to 30 directors and nine actors from Asia.

Eighteen – Still Too Young to Die: Many will recognize the cheeky reference to Nyaff 2016 audience award winner, Kudo Kankuro’s Too Young to Die!, in which a busload of high-school students plummet to their deaths. They either end up in heaven or hell, both of which defy expectations. Graduating into adulthood, Nyaff aims to defy expectations cinematically.

With the irreverent action-comedy
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

‘Warrior’ Casts Four For Season 2 Of Cinemax Drama Series; Promotes Dustin Nguyen To Regular

‘Warrior’ Casts Four For Season 2 Of Cinemax Drama Series; Promotes Dustin Nguyen To Regular
Exclusive: Warrior is setting its cast for Season 2 of the Cinemax drama series, from Justin Lin and Banshee co-creator Jonathan Tropper. Dustin Nguyen, who recurs as Zing in Season 1, has been promoted to series regular for the second season, and also will direct the sixth episode of Season 2. In addition, Chen Tang (Bosch), Celine Buckens (Free Rein) and Miranda Raison (Dark Heart) have joined the series regular cast, and Maria Elena Laas (Vida) will recur.

Created by Tropper, based on the writings of martial arts legend Bruce Lee, Warrior is a gritty, action-packed crime drama set during the brutal Tong Wars of San Francisco’s Chinatown in the second half of the 19th century. The series follows Ah Sahm (Andrew Koji), a martial arts prodigy who emigrates from China to San Francisco under mysterious circumstances. After proving his worth as a fighter, Ah Sahm becomes a hatchet man for the Hope Wei,
See full article at Deadline »

Roberta Haynes Dies: ‘Return To Paradise’, ‘The Nebraskan’ Actress Was 91

  • Deadline
Roberta Haynes Dies: ‘Return To Paradise’, ‘The Nebraskan’ Actress Was 91
Actress Roberta Haynes died Thursday in her home in Delray Beach. She was 91.

Haynes is known for her role opposite Gary Cooper in the 1953 Mark Robson-directed film Return to Paradise where she played a native of Matareva who develops a relationship with Cooper’s American drifter Mr. Morgan. In the same year, she starred in two westerns including The Nebraskan directed by Fred F. Sears and Gun Fury directed by Raoul Walsh.

Born Roberta Arline Schack in Wichita Falls, Tex. on Aug. 19, 1929, Haynes was raised in Toronto and moved on to California where she starred on Broadway and film. In 1949, she appeared in the film Knock on Any Door starring Humphrey Bogart and the John Huston-directed We Were Strangers. On stage, appeared The Madwoman of Chaillot in 1950 opposite John Carradine as well as The Fighter with Lee. J. Cobb in 1952. Her other film credits include High Noon, Gun Fury and Hell Ship Mutiny.
See full article at Deadline »

Review: Furie – Does Veronica Ngo How To Save Her Daughter?

Furie came onto my radar because it’s a martial arts film starring Veronic Ngo. She’s been popping up in movies lately, most notably a small role in The Last Jedi and minor role in the head scratching sequel to Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon. I, however, remember her from The Rebel, a 2007 martial arts film starring and action directed by Johnny Nguyen. You may remember him as the staircase boss from the infamous one take scene in Tony Jaa’s Tom Yum Goon. While it’s been awhile since I’ve seen The Rebel, I remember being pretty impressed with Veronica’s ability as a martial artist. Strangely though, more than 10 years later, I finally get to see her in another martial arts role that isn’t a throw...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Fantasia 2018 Review: Loi Bao Is A Fun Martial Arts Oddity From Vietnam

It's been several years since the Vietnamese film industry had its moment as the next big thing in martial arts action. Back in the late '00s, led by incredible performer Johnny Tri Nguyen and director Charlie Nguyen, Vietnam was beginning to make a name for itself. Films like The Rebel and Clash were making the festival rounds and even getting picked up for overseas distribution thanks to high octane, inventive action sequences and gritty, real stories that connected with audiences much in the same way that late '80s-early '90s Hong Kong martial arts cinema did. Then, around 2013 with the banning of another Johnny Tri Nguyen/Charlie Nguyen collaboration, the politically charged Cho Lon, everything just kind of died. Cut to five years later and now...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

For better and for worse, the music of ‘Star Wars’ dominates its middle chapters

Among the many sweeping divisions that separate the original Star Wars trilogy from the Prequels is in how “used” the films feel; or to put it another way, how the Prequels don’t. The franchise’s earlier installments have endured trends of computer graphics and frenetic editing across several generations in part because George Lucas leveraged a tight production budget with rusty edges and sputtering engines. The Millennium Falcon needs a few loving punches to fire up its nav-comptuer. The Rebel base on Hoth looks more like a rundown snow fort than an outpost fit for a princess. And the most powerful being in the galaxy might actually be a Grover-voiced frog puppet, rubber lips and all.

As covered in the first volume of this series, John Williams taps into the charm of used futurism with his music, doubling down on A New Hope‘s distressed and worn out compositions for its first sequel,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

For better and for worse, the music of ‘Star Wars’ dominates its middle chapters

Among the many sweeping dichotomies that separate the Star Wars Trilogy from the Prequels is how “used” the original films feel; or to phrase it another way, how the Prequels don’t. Part of the charm that’s allowed the franchise to persist for generations lies in how George Lucas leveraged a risky production budget with rusty edges and sputtering engines. The Millennium Falcon needs a few loving punches to fire up its nav-comptuer. The Rebel base on Hoth looks more like a rundown snow fort than an outpost fit for a princess. And the most powerful being in a galaxy far, far away might actually be a Grover-voiced frog puppet, rubber lips and all.

As already outlined in the first volume of this series, John Williams mirrors Star Wars’ “used future” masterfully in his music, doubling down on A New Hope‘s distressed and worn out compositions for its sequel.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

'Empire Strikes Back' director Irvin Kershner: An appreciation

'Empire Strikes Back' director Irvin Kershner: An appreciation
George Lucas will always be known as the genius behind Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, and Darth Vader. But it was Irvin Kershner, a professorial and genteel man of the old school, who directed the film most Star Wars aficionados consider the greatest chapter in the saga, 1980′s The Empire Strikes Back. It was to Kershner’s credit that he never jockeyed for the limelight or clawed for the credit. He was a quiet craftsman who believed in letting the images he put on screen speak for him. The news that Kershner passed away earlier today leaves a giant black hole
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »

R.I.P. Irvin Kershner (1923-2010)

Following on from the sad news of comedy legend Leslie Nielsen's passing comes word that Irvin Kershner has died at his home in Los Angeles, aged 87. The American filmmaker - best known for directing the all-time classic Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back, was born Philadelphia in 1923 and after serving in World War II he began his career teaching photography at USC School of Cinematic Arts while studying film under montage artist Slavko Vorkapi.

Kershner made his feature film debut with the crime film Stakeout on Dope Street (1958) and honed his skills directing television shows such as The Rebel (1959), Philip Marlowe (1959) and Peyton Place (1964). Through-out the 60s and 70s Kersh collaborated with the likes of Sean Connery, Faye Dunaway, Richard Harris, Tommy Lee Jones, George C. Scott, Robert Shaw and Barbra Streisand with credits including The Luck of Ginger Coffey (1964), A Fine Madness (1966) and Eyes of Laura Mars
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Rip Irvin Kershner

The Associated Press is reporting that Irvin Kershner, director of the critically-acclaimed sequel to Star Wars, has passed away in Los Angeles following a long illness. He was 87.

Born in Philadelphia, Pa in 1923, Kershner's first love was music. He studied the violin, viola, and composition at Philadelphia's Temple University. He later moved on to painting and then photography, where he attended the Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles. Finally, Kershner began his film career at University of Southern California's acclaimed School of Cinematic Arts.

After a foray into government-sponsored still photography projects in Iran, Kershner returned to the States and co-developed a documentary film series called Confidential File. This led to Kershner directing the short-lived television series The Rebel, as well as several TV pilots, including Peyton's Place and Philip Marlowe. A feature film career followed, with Kershner at the helm of such films as The Flim-Flam Man,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Ask the Flying Monkey! (May 27, 2009)

Have a question about gay male entertainment? Ask the Monkey! (Please include your city and state and/or country.)

Q: So Gregory Michael, who plays gay on Dante’s Cove, is now playing Calvin’s love interest on Greek. So what gives? Gay guy or just a really cool straight one? – Jason, Milwaukee, Wi

A: A really cool straight one.

“I didn't have any reservations about it being gay or what kind of character it was,” Gregory tells AfterElton.com. “Just, ‘It's another role – are you ready to do it?’ You look at everything. I just got back from the holidays [when I did it]. Did I eat too much? Am I going to look good? You look at those things, not, ‘Oh, I'm doing another gay role.’”

Gregory Michael

Interestingly, Gregory didn’t even consider the aspect of doing two prominent gay roles until his manager said to him, "You know you're doing another gay role.
See full article at The Backlot »

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