The Devil's Disciple (1959) - News Poster

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More 4th of July Escapism: Small-Town Iowa and Declaration of Independence Musicals

More 4th of July Escapism: Small-Town Iowa and Declaration of Independence Musicals
(See previous post: Fourth of July Movies: Escapism During a Weird Year.) On the evening of the Fourth of July, besides fireworks, fire hazards, and Yankee Doodle Dandy, if you're watching TCM in the U.S. and Canada, there's the following: Peter H. Hunt's 1776 (1972), a largely forgotten film musical based on the Broadway hit with music by Sherman Edwards. William Daniels, who was recently on TCM talking about 1776 and a couple of other movies (A Thousand Clowns, Dodsworth), has one of the key roles as John Adams. Howard Da Silva, blacklisted for over a decade after being named a communist during the House Un-American Committee hearings of the early 1950s (Robert Taylor was one who mentioned him in his testimony), plays Benjamin Franklin. Ken Howard is Thomas Jefferson, a role he would reprise in John Huston's 1976 short Independence. (In the short, Pat Hingle was cast as John Adams; Eli Wallach was Benjamin Franklin.) Warner
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Recommended Films in Times of Madness: Singing Kidnappers and Dancing Puerto Ricans Will Make You Forget Ballistic Missiles

Recommended Films in Times of Madness: Singing Kidnappers and Dancing Puerto Ricans Will Make You Forget Ballistic Missiles
Fourth of July movies: A few recommended titles that should help you temporarily escape current global madness Two thousand and seventeen has been a weirder-than-usual year on the already pretty weird Planet Earth. Unsurprisingly, this Fourth of July, the day the United States celebrates its Declaration of Independence from the British Empire, has been an unusual one as well. Instead of fireworks, (at least some) people's attention has been turned to missiles – more specifically, a carefully timed North Korean intercontinental ballistic missile test indicating that Kim Jong-un could theoretically gain (or could already have?) the capacity to strike North America with nuclear weapons. Then there were right-wing trolls & history-deficient Twitter users berating National Public Radio for tweeting the Declaration of Independence, 140 characters at a time. Besides, a few days ago the current U.S. president retweeted a video of himself body-slamming and choking a representation of CNN – courtesy of a gif originally created by a far-right Internet
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Guy Hamilton, James Bond Director, Passes Away at 93

Guy Hamilton, James Bond Director, Passes Away at 93
Guy Hamilton, who directed four James Bond movies including the 1964 classic Goldfinger, passed away earlier today at the age of 93. The filmmaker died on the Spanish island of Majorca where he lived. No details about the cause of death were given at this time, but we'll be sure to keep you posted with more updates as soon as they come in.

Guy Hamilton was born September 16, 1922 in Paris, France, and he got his start in the film business in the late 1940s. He served as director Carol Reed's assistant for five years, before becoming an assistant director on his 1949 classic film The Third Man. He also served as an assistant director on The Angel With the Trumpet, The Great Manhunt, Outcast of the Islands and the John Huston classic The African Queen, before making his directorial debut in 1951 with The Ringer.

He went on to direct An Inspector Calls,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Guy Hamilton Dead At Age 93; Directed Four James Bond Films And "Battle Of Britain".

  • CinemaRetro
Guy Hamilton and Roger Moore on the set of "The Man With the Golden Gun" in Thailand, 1974.

 

By Lee Pfeiffer

Cinema Retro mourns the loss of director Guy Hamilton, who has passed away at age 93. Guy was an old friend and supporter of our magazine and a wonderful talent and raconteur. Hamilton, though British by birth, spent much of his life in France. After WWII, he entered the film industry in England and served as assistant director to Sir Carol Reed, working on the classic film "The Third Man". He also served as Ad on John Huston's "The African Queen". Gradually, he moved up the ladder to director and helmed such films as "An Inspector Calls", "The Colditz Story" and "The Devil's Disciple", the latter starring Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas and Laurence Olivier. In 1964 Hamilton was hired to direct the third James Bond film "Goldfinger" and made cinema history.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

BBC One's Ordinary Lies tops Tuesday with 4.8m for final episode

Ordinary Lies topped the ratings outside of soaps once again, according to overnight data for Tuesday (April 21).

The BBC One drama attracted 4.79m (22.7%) for its final episode, adding around 300,000 viewers from last week, at 9pm. Later, Del Boys and Dealers was seen by 1.82m (19.8%) at 10.45pm.

On BBC Two, Alex Polizzi: Chefs on Trial interested 1.41m (7.1%) at 8pm, while Back in Time for Dinner continued with 1.74m (8.3%) at 9pm.

ITV's coverage of the Champions League tie between Barcelona and Psg averaged 1.89m (11.2%) between 7.30pm and 10pm.

Channel 4's Plus Sized Wars interested 1.26m (6.4%) at 8pm (123k/0.6% on +1), and One Born Every Minute thrilled 1.34m (6.4%) at 9pm (234k/1.5%). Ballot Monkeys was seen by 890k (5.4%) at 10pm (109k/1.4%).

On Channel 5, Britain's Horror Homes fascinated 874k (4.4%) at 8pm (76k/0.4%), while The Devil's Disciple brought in 676k (3.2%) at 9pm (98k/0.6%). Family Secrets and Lies gathered 596k (3.9%) at 10pm (21k/0.3%).

BBC Three's Stacey
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

4th of July TV: Nathan's hotdog eating contest, 'Buckwild' marathon and more

If you're like us, with the 4th of July being a Thursday, you have to work Friday and don't get a four-day weekend. So, we're settling in for some good TV the next couple of days. Set your DVRs if you're heading out of town!

All times Eastern.

Thursday, July 4

A&E: "The First 48" marathon, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., "Independence Day," 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.

ABC Family: "National Treasure" marathon, noon to 11 p.m.

AMC: "The Walking Dead" Season 1 marathon, 1 p.m. to 8 p.m., replayed in black and white after

BBC America: "Star Trek: The Next Generation" marathon, 8 a.m. to 6 a.m. the next day

CBS: "The Price is Right" Fourth of July special, 11 a.m.

Chiller: "Fear Factor" marathon, 6 a.m. to 6 a.m. the next day

Espn: 2013 Wimbledon women's semifinals, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 2013 Hot Dog Eating Contest at Coney Island,
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Sir Richard Rodney Bennett obituary

Composer and pianist whose work included film scores, opera and jazz cabaret

The composer Richard Rodney Bennett, who has died in New York aged 76, pursued multiple musical lives with extraordinary success. He was one of the more distinguished soundtrack composers of his era, having contributed to some 50 films and winning Oscar nominations for his work on Far from the Madding Crowd (1967), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971) and Murder on the Orient Express (1974).

But it scarcely seemed credible that this knack for writing for a mainstream audience in a melodic, romantic style co-existed with his mastery of serialism and 12-tone techniques. From 1957 to 1959, Bennett was a scholarship student with Pierre Boulez in Paris and soaked up the latter's total serialism techniques as well as his infatuation with the German avant garde. He also attended the summer schools at Darmstadt, the mecca for diehard atonalists.

His tremendous facility as a pianist would prompt the
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Sir Richard Rodney Bennett obituary

Composer and pianist whose work included film scores, opera and jazz cabaret

The composer Richard Rodney Bennett, who has died in New York aged 76, pursued multiple musical lives with extraordinary success. He was one of the more distinguished soundtrack composers of his era, having contributed to some 50 films and winning Oscar nominations for his work on Far from the Madding Crowd (1967), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971) and Murder on the Orient Express (1974).

But it scarcely seemed credible that this knack for writing for a mainstream audience in a melodic, romantic style co-existed with his mastery of serialism and 12-tone techniques. From 1957 to 1959, Bennett was a scholarship student with Pierre Boulez in Paris and soaked up the latter's total serialism techniques as well as his infatuation with the German avant garde. He also attended the summer schools at Darmstadt, the mecca for diehard atonalists.

His tremendous facility as a pianist would prompt the
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Sir Richard Rodney Bennett, Oscar-nominated Composer, Dead At Age 76

  • CinemaRetro
One of the film industry's last great composers has passed away at age 76. Sir Richard Rodney Bennett died this week in New York. The prolific composer was part of a now bygone age when spectacular and memorable film scores were a routine part of the motion picture industry. Bennett was nominated for three Oscars for his work on Far From the Madding Crowd, Nicholas and Alexandra and Murder On The Orient Express. He was also nominated for numerous BAFTA awards for his work in film and on television. Bennett was also acclaimed for his non-film work that included writing symphonies and operas. His other feature film scores include Billy Liar, Equus, Billion Dollar Brain, Four Weddings and a Funeral and The Devil's Disciple. For more click here
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Rare Movie Alert! "The Devil's Disciple" (1959) On TCM July 4

  • CinemaRetro
Turner Classic Movies is celebrating the 4th of July with screenings of patriotic movies all day. Included in the schedule is the underrated 1959 film adaptation of George Bernard Shaw's The Devil's Disciple with the stellar teaming of Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas and Laurence Olivier. The consistently amusing comedy set in the American Revolution features fine direction by Guy Hamilton. The film has never been released on DVD so crank up those recorders! (Check your local listings for time)
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Joyce Redman obituary

Vivacious Irish actor best known for her role opposite Albert Finney in Tom Jones

The red-haired, vivacious and provocative Irish actor Joyce Redman, who has died aged 93, will for ever be remembered for her lubricious meal-time munching and swallowing opposite Albert Finney in Tony Richardson's 1963 film of Tom Jones. Eyes locked, lips smacked and jaws rotated as the two of them tucked into a succulent feast while eyeing up the afters. Sinking one's teeth into a role is one thing. This was quite another, and deliciously naughty, the mother of all modern mastication scenes.

Redman and Finney were renewing a friendship forged five years earlier when both appeared with Charles Laughton in Jane Arden's The Party at the New (now the Noël Coward) theatre. Redman was not blamed by the critic Kenneth Tynan for making nothing of her role as Laughton's wife. "Nothing," he said, "after all, will come of nothing.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Kirk Douglas @ 95

  • MUBI
Issur Danielovitch Demsky was to Russian-Jewish immigrant parents in Amsterdam, New York, on this day in 1916 and, to celebrate, the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung and the Telegraph have posted photo galleries. Both are fine as these things go, but not nearly as much fun as Douglas's own official site, which greets you with a clip (you know which one) from Kubrick's Spartacus (1960).

It was while serving in the Us Navy during World War II that Izzy Demsky changed his name to Kirk Douglas, by which time he'd already made a name for himself as a champion wrestler and as a performer in plays at Saint Lawrence University in upstate New York. He'd attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in NYC, where he met Betty Joan Perske (later to become better known as Lauren Bacall), who'd eventually score him a screen test for his first film role in The Strange Love of Martha Ivers,
See full article at MUBI »

2011 Fourth of July marathons, movies and specials

It's time to celebrate the nation's independence. If you aren't boating, picnicking, enjoying fireworks or what have you, Zap2it has you covered for all the marathons, movies and specials you can settle in for instead. Or set your DVR - all of "Harper's Island" is showing on Chiller!

Here is all the programming for this holiday weekend. All times Eastern. Check your local listings for channel numbers.

Friday, July 1

BBC America: "Star Trek: The Next Generation" marathon, 8 a.m. to midnight

Hgtv: "House Hunters" marathon, 7 p.m. to 4 a.m. the next day

NBC: Wimbledon, Men's Semifinals, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., new "Friday Night Lights," 8 p.m.

Sci: "How It's Made" marathon, 9 a.m. to 3 a.m. the next day

Syfy: "Warehouse 13" marathon, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

USA: "House" marathon, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

VH1: "Mob Wives," "Basketball Wives" marathon 11:30 a.m.
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Tp McKenna obituary

Versatile Irish stage actor who became a familiar face across British drama

Before he became a familiar face on television and cinema screens, the outstanding Irish actor Tp McKenna, who has died after a long illness aged 81, bridged the gap between the old and the new Abbey theatres in Dublin. He appeared with the company for eight years during the interim period at the Queen's theatre; the old Abbey burned down in 1951, the new one opened by the Liffey in 1966.

During that time he made his reputation as a leading actor of great charm, vocal resource – with a fine singing voice – and versatility. He was equally adept at comedy and tragedy, a great exponent of the best Irish playwriting from Jm Synge and Séan O'Casey to Hugh Leonard and Brian Friel. The elder son in Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night was a favourite, much acclaimed role.

It was Stephen D,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Tp McKenna obituary

Versatile Irish stage actor who became a familiar face across British drama

Before he became a familiar face on television and cinema screens, the outstanding Irish actor Tp McKenna, who has died after a long illness aged 81, bridged the gap between the old and the new Abbey theatres in Dublin. He appeared with the company for eight years during the interim period at the Queen's theatre; the old Abbey burned down in 1951, the new one opened by the Liffey in 1966.

During that time he made his reputation as a leading actor of great charm, vocal resource – with a fine singing voice – and versatility. He was equally adept at comedy and tragedy, a great exponent of the best Irish playwriting from Jm Synge and Séan O'Casey to Hugh Leonard and Brian Friel. The elder son in Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night was a favourite, much acclaimed role.

It was Stephen D,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Grin, Smile, Smirk: The Films Of Burt Lancaster

On September 3, 1981, Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas brought Bernard Sabath's The Boys of Autumn for a trial run to Marines Memorial Theatre, San Francisco. A "what-if" tale about the reunion of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn 50 years after their infamous adventures on the Mississippi, Lancaster played Henry Finnegan (Huck, of course) and Douglas his old friend Thomas Gray (Sawyer). Having retired from vaudeville, Tom Sawyer--who has been using the stage name of Thomas Gray--returns to his home in the South searching for his boyhood friend Huckleberry Finn. The play was directed by Tom Moore and ran for four weeks (some sources say six) and reunited Lancaster and Douglas for their seventh collaboration after previously starring together in six films: I Walk Alone (1948), Gunfight at the Ok Corral (1957), The Devil's Disciple (1959), The List of Adrian Messenger (1963), Seven Days in May (1964), and the made-for-tv Victory at Entebbe (1976). They would work together
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Clear and 'Present'

Victor Garber says the biggest challenge he's facing at the moment is not quite feeling up to snuff. "I have a touch of bronchitis to remind me of my mortality," he quips, noting it doesn't help a performance either. That aside, the most daunting task in doing a Noël Coward play is "just getting the words out and making them sound like you're actually saying them," asserts Garber, who is stretched out in his dressing-room chaise longue before a performance of the playwright's "Present Laughter." "Doing Coward is in many ways akin to doing Shakespeare," says the actor. "I'm not that smart. Few are. But you have to make it sound like you are that smart." It has also been more than a decade since Garber last appeared on Broadway, when he starred with Alan Alda and Alfred Molina in Yasmina Reza's "Art."But have no doubt: The Tony-
See full article at Backstage »

Trp Presents The Devil's Disciple 3/20-4/12

Theatre in the Round Players (Trp) presents The Devil's Disciple by George Bernard Shaw in weekend performances March 20 through April 12. In a New Hampshire village during the Revolutionary War, the local rascal Dick Dudgeon is mistaken for the town's minister and arrested by the British as a rebel. Now facing the gallows, will this scoundrel betray the reverend? In his only play set in America, George Bernard Shaw aims his wicked wit at our War for Independence, along with his usual targets - religion, the English, the military - in a crackling comic melodrama.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

See also

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