Horrors of the Black Museum (1959) - News Poster

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A Study in Terror

A Study in Terror

Blu ray

Mill Creek Entertainment

1966 /1:85 / Street Date April 3, 2018

Starring John Neville, Donald Houston, Anthony Quayle

Cinematography by Desmond Dickinson

Written by Donald Ford, Derek Ford

Directed by James Hill

From master criminals like Professor Moriarty to Sebastian Moran, Sherlock Holmes faced his fair share of danger – but his greatest nemesis may have been the man who created him, Arthur Conan Doyle. Exasperated by his brainchild’s overwhelming popularity, the weary scribe groused, ”I think of slaying Holmes… and winding him up for good and all. He takes my mind from better things.”

Doyle tried to kill off his cash-cow on at least one occasion but the great detective had the last word, maintaining a firm grip on our imagination decades after other seemingly invincible literary characters dropped down the memory hole – perhaps because Holmes is far more mysterious than any mystery he himself might have
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Horrors Of The Black Museum (1959)

If you were a kid or teenager in the ’50s or ’60s and dug horror and/or sci-fi, the chances were astronomically good that you were watching something from American International Pictures, aka Aip, home to hormonal werewolves, monsters, and other adolescent dilemmas. Add in British comedy makers Anglo-Amalgamated Productions (the Carry On series of films) to the mix, and you probably ended up watching Horrors of the Black Museum (1959), a wry and dry romp highlighted by Michael Gough's (Sleepy Hollow) delightful performance.

Released stateside at the end of April with a rollout in the UK the following month, Horrors of the Black Museum actually made some good coin; Aip added a 13-minute prologue featuring a hypnotist (filmed in Hypno-Vista, ooh) to the American release to draw people in (although completely disconnected from the narrative of the film), and it worked, gimmick and all. Hooray for showbiz! Despite the tacked-on hucksterism,
See full article at DailyDead »

Hypnotic Chill! Monster Thrill!

This short article is in the spirit of the crowded ad-mat advertising blurbs that, once upon a time, would show up in the newspaper for horror related features. The particular composite above is a fantasy, but since all films back then were for General Audiences, a stack like it is entirely credible. Here, it’s an excuse for a trio of personal Savant anecdotes, vividly remembered from fifty-odd years ago.

Not Bad! Charlie Largent assembled this convincing triple bill ad paste-up,

customized for San Bernardino in 1964.

Don’t listen to Gen X’ers or Millennials, kids: the Real era to be an adolescent moviegoer was in the 1950s and 1960s, when downtown movie palaces had regular Saturday kiddie matinees, just as seen in the nostalgic Joe Dante movie. Theaters in most towns functioned as ad hoc babysitters, with kids dropped off in clumps. In many cases the oldest squab in
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Beautiful Cult Horror Cinema Actress (and Bond Girl Contender) Has Died

Yvonne Monlaur: Cult horror movie actress & Bond Girl contender was featured in the 1960 British classics 'Circus of Horrors' & 'The Brides of Dracula.' Actress Yvonne Monlaur dead at 77: Best remembered for cult horror classics 'Circus of Horrors' & 'The Brides of Dracula' Actress Yvonne Monlaur, best known for her roles in the 1960 British cult horror classics Circus of Horrors and The Brides of Dracula, died of cardiac arrest on April 18 in the Paris suburb of Neuilly-sur-Seine. Monlaur was 77. According to various online sources, she was born Yvonne Thérèse Marie Camille Bédat de Monlaur in the southwestern town of Pau, in France's Pyrénées-Atlantiques department, on Dec. 15, 1939. Her father was poet and librettist Pierre Bédat de Monlaur; her mother was a Russian ballet dancer. The young Yvonne was trained in ballet and while still a teenager became a model for Elle magazine. She was “discovered” by newspaper publisher-turned-director André Hunebelle,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Headless Ghost: Fun 1950s Horror Movies to Watch During Halloween

I’m a big fan of horror comedy. It’s a combination that isn’t easy to get right, but when it is done well it can be hilarious. A couple of my favorite horror comedies in recent years include The Cabin in the Woods, Tucker Dale Vs. Evil, and Hell Baby. Horror comedies have been around forever, though, and I had to include one of them in the 1950s horror movie column that I’ve been writing this month for Halloween.

The next film on my list is the 1959 film The Headless Ghost. The story follows three college students, two Americans and a girl from Denmark, who take a day trip from London to visit an old English castle called Ambrose Castle. The three students hide in the castle after it is closed to see if the legends of the ghosts they heard about were real. There they find the headless ghost.
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Shudder’s October Titles to Include 1980s Anthology Series Tales From The Darkside

  • DailyDead
Shudder will take viewers to the place that's "not as brightly lit" this Halloween season, as the 1980s anthology series Tales From the Darkside will be available to watch in its entirety on the horror streaming service beginning October 1st:

Press Release: New York, New York – September 26, 2016 – The AMC-backed streaming service, Shudder, is The entertainment destination for everything you need to watch this Halloween season. Whether you’re a hardcore horror fan or simply looking for the scariest films to celebrate this time of year, Shudder has something for everyone in its sweeping library, carefully curated by some of the top horror experts in the world.

As Halloween approaches, Shudder is expanding its database with a variety of new titles including cult favorites, blockbuster hits, and classic thrillers. Additionally, for the first time ever, Shudder will be offering horror TV series to complement its expansive film library.

Premiering October 20th
See full article at DailyDead »

Herman Cohen’s Lurid Horror with a British Accent

Hammer wasn't the only studio in Britain mining the vein of horror films that made them such attractive imports for American theaters. Before Amicus and Trigon arose in the 1960s, American producer Herman Cohen made a deal with British studio Anglo-Amalgamated to produce a pair of lurid horrors with British accents. Horrors of the Black Museum (1959), starring Michael Gough as a crime reporter who takes too much delight in the most grotesque murders, is the first of them, arriving in theaters after Hammer had brought new life to old horror icons with full, blood-dripping color, lurid Gothic style, bodice-ripping sexuality, and villains who revel in their power.>> - Sean Axmaker
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Herman Cohen’s Lurid Horror with a British Accent

Hammer wasn't the only studio in Britain mining the vein of horror films that made them such attractive imports for American theaters. Before Amicus and Trigon arose in the 1960s, American producer Herman Cohen made a deal with British studio Anglo-Amalgamated to produce a pair of lurid horrors with British accents. Horrors of the Black Museum (1959), starring Michael Gough as a crime reporter who takes too much delight in the most grotesque murders, is the first of them, arriving in theaters after Hammer had brought new life to old horror icons with full, blood-dripping color, lurid Gothic style, bodice-ripping sexuality, and villains who revel in their power.>> - Sean Axmaker
See full article at Keyframe »

“We came, we turned the lights off, we scared the s*&t out of them.” Greg Day & Alan Jones on FrightFest

  • HeyUGuys
The delights of genre cinema are born from human imagination. The stories are nurtured by individuals who optimistically hope and believe across the years of their lives that a single film will devour that their tales arrive at the intended destination – to discover and touch the sensibilities of the audience.

If films are born out of the imagination then so the same could be said for the festivals that showcase them – festivals such as FrightFest that are crafted according to an ethos shared by four men who genre cinema continues to owe an immeasurable debt of gratitude – “‘Run by fans for the fans”, to find those great new voices in genre and see what difference they can make, and to ensure the FrightFest spirit of community endures.

But those who champion and showcase films, supporting their endeavours to find an audience on their ongoing journey from the intimate confines of its maker’s world,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Dawn of the Dead Historian Roy Frumkes Offers New Fiend Without a Face Update

We reported that Roy Frumkes (Document of the Dead, Street Trash) owned the rights to Arthur Crabtree's 1958 creature feature Fiend Without a Face way back in 2010. Finally an update on it and more has come.

"I’ve wanted to do this film for 40 years, so I already had it all in my head, and it wasn’t hard to write. What I didn’t have was the technical information; I’m no science buff. Now I’m interviewing scientists, getting the technology straight,” Frumkes tells Fango. "It’s set in a think tank in the Berkshires, and it’s not about young people. It’s a mature film, but it has a Street Trash sensibility, so the people who like my work will not be disappointed.”

The site also scored a still from a fund-raising trailer Frumkes shot for his Fiend flick with director Franco Frassetti, which features Ursula
See full article at Dread Central »

Tim Burton, 'Frankenweenie' Director, On Pee-wee Herman, Boris Karloff And Halloween Plans

In Tim Burton's animated horror-comedy "Frankenweenie," opening on October 5, the story of "Frankenstein's Monster" has been transplanted to elementary school. This time around, Victor is a little boy and his mad experiment aims to resurrect his dearly departed dog Sparky. But with the upcoming science fair kicking into high gear, it gives Victor's competitive classmates the license to create a zoo of demented monster animals. This isn't the first time that Burton has told the "Frankenweenie" story; it was originally a live-action short from 1984. But now working with the backing of Disney, he has turned his gothic fable into a 3D stop-motion love letter to the golden age of movie monsters, complete with references to "Godzilla," "The Mummy" and "Creature From the Black Lagoon." Moviefone spoke with the macabre director about his love of classic horror films and the impact that legends like Boris Karloff and Ray Harryhausen had on his style.
See full article at Moviefone »

Halloween Mod from Warner Archive Black Zoo on DVD

Michael Gough is known to modern audiences as Alfred the Butler in the Batman films. But fans of horror movies know that he was one of the most entertaining villains of 60's English horror cinema playing mad baddies in Herman Cohen films like Horrors of the Black Museum (1959), Konga (1961) and this little number. Here he plays a sadistic zookeeper and big cat cult worshipper determined to protect his beloved felines at any cost including using the kitties to kill those who stand in his way. Elsiha Cook jr. from The Killing (1956), House on Haunted Hill (1959) and numerous other famous films has a great smaller role as one of the victims but the real star here is Gough who chews up the...
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Remember Me: Michael Gough

Stars bring a character to life on the screen; but behind them is another kind of actor that brings life to that character’s world. They are the seasoning which turns a good meal into a great meal, the chinking keeping a cold wind from blowing through the holes in a script. Call them what you will: supporting players, character actors, familiar faces, second bananas. To most viewers, their names mean nothing, and a headshot over their obituary usually draws little more than an, “Oh, yeah, that guy!” They rarely get their due, often only at their passing, which, sadly, makes it time to give one of the best his due – Michael Gough, who died this week at the age of 94.

All of his obits usually start with saying he was best known for his role as Batman’s faithful butler Alfred in the Tim Burton version of Batman (1989) and its three sequels.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

R.I.P. Michael Gough

Legendary actor Michael Gough (Batman, Batman Returns) has passed away at the age of 94 after battling an illness over the last year. He died at his home, surrounded by his family. Gough is survived by his fourth wife Henrietta, daughter Emma, and his two sons Simon and Jasper.

While most people know Gough for his portrayal of Alfred Pennyworth in director Tim Burton‘s late 80s and early 90s trips to Gotham City with Batman and Batman Returns, as well as his reprisal of the role in Joel Schumacher‘s installments in the franchise, Batman Forever and Batman and Robin, the actor had a decades-long career and numerous roles both on television and in films.

Gough had roles in numerous classic television series’ like The Avengers and The Saint, along with repeated appearances on the British sci-fi series Doctor Who between the late 1960s and early 1980s. The actor attained
See full article at ScifiMafia »

British Horror Actor Michael Gough Dead at 94

British cult horror actor Michael Gough has died at the age of 94 after a stellar career playing character roles in over 100 films. Horror fans know him well from his role in the seminal Hammer Horror film Horror Of Dracula (1958) as well as cult goodies such as Horror Hospital, Horrors Of The Black Museum, Legend Of Hell House, and Konga. A younger generation of film fans discovered him when he starred as Alfred the butler in the 90′s Batman franchise and he continued working up to his death, providing voice work for Tim Burton’s The Corpse Bride and last year’s Alice In Wonderland.

From The Daily Telegraph:

Michael Gough, the actor who died on Thursday aged 94, achieved cult status for his roles in the Hammer horror films of the 1960s, but became better known as Alfred the Butler in Tim Burton’s Batman films; he was also an accomplished stage actor,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Batman Actor Michael Gough Passes Away

Genre TV and Movie fans are mourning the loss of British actor Michael Gough who died at the age of 94 at his home in England. He was best known in this country for playing Alfred Pennyworth, Bruce Wayne’s butler in the 80′s and 90′s Batman films.

Gough had a long and illustrious career including memorable roles in Laurence Olivier’s Richard III (1955, Out of Africa (1985) and The Citadel (1983). Genre fans will remember him though in multiple roles in British horror films throughout the 1960′s and 1970′s like Hammer Film ProductionsDracula (1958), Horrors of the Black Museum (1959), The Phantom of the Opera (1962), and Satan’s Slave (1976). Science-fiction fans may remember him in multiple roles in Doctor Who as Councillor Hedin and the Celestial Toymaker. He was nominated for a BAFTA Award in 1970 for his supporting role in The Go-Between.

In more recent years he became a staple of Tim Burton
See full article at BuzzFocus.com »

Batman Star Michael Gough Passes Away

Batman Star Michael Gough Passes Away
Michael Gough, who played Alfred Pennyworth in director Tim Burton's Batman and Batman Returns , as well as Joel Schumacher's Batman Forever and Batman & Robin , passed away today (March 17th) at the age of 94. Gough was born in Kuala Lumpur, Malaya (now Malaysia) on November 23, 1916. He has appeared in more than 100 films, but is most known worldwide for his role of Alfred in the four "Batman" films. The actor made his film debut in 1947 in Blanche Fury , and since appeared numerous times on British television. Gough also had roles in many horror films, such as Dracula in 1958, The Phantom of the Opera in 1962, Horrors of the Black Museum in 1960, The Corpse in 1970 and Satan's Slave in 1976. Gough also reprised his role of Alfred...
See full article at Comingsoon.net »

Fred Fetes a Fiend Without a Face

Fred Fetes a Fiend Without a Face
By Fred Burdsall

Fiend Without a Face first started out as a story that appeared in Weird Tales (possibly the best fantasy/horror fiction magazine ever) back in 1930 as “The Thought Monster” by Amelia Reynolds Long. The film’s director, Arthur Crabtree, also gave us Horrors of the Black Museum in 1959.

A lone sentry on patrol hears a crunching, slurping sound in the woods and goes to investigate. A farmer out checking on his cows in the early morning is attacked and the sentry arrives seconds later to find a dead man and no sign of the killer. Official cause of death: Heart Failure. The Air Force wants to do an autopsy but his daughter, Barbara (Kim Parker), won’t allow it and hands the body over to the local authorities.

The Adams farm comes under attack and the old couple die as horribly as Farmer Griselle did. The Air
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

DVD Releases for Oct. 19th. Time to stock up for Halloween.

This week sees a ton of genre movies coming out on DVD and Blu- Ray. The biggest being Predators, followed up by the remake of the cult classic Night of the Demons, a sequel to Mirrors, and Anniversary editions for Rocky Horror Picture Show and Psycho. Add to that a slew of indie and classic horror and there is a lot to choose from.

Predators

Directed by Nimród Antal

Robert Rodriguez presents Predators, a bold new chapter in the Predator universe. Adrien Brody stars as Royce, a mercenary who reluctantly leads a group of elite warriors mysteriously brought together on a jungle planet. But when these cold-blooded human “predators” find themselves in all-out war against a new breed of alien Predators, it’s the ultimate showdown between hunter and prey. Predators also star Laurence Fishburne, Topher Grace, Alice Braga, Walton Goggins, Danny Trejo, Mahershalalhashbaz Ali, Oleg Taktarov, and Louis Ozawa Changchien.
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

DVD Releases - October 19th: It's a Rocky, Psycho Night of the Predators in Mirrors

The number of home video releases on October 19th is not as abundant as in recent weeks, and fewer re-released titles means those that are available are much more special. In this batch one Adrien Brody flick competes with another, and at least two independent horror titles are making a splash. Two beloved classic films return in Blu-ray where one is supplemented by a documentary treatment of it.

Also, don't forget to strum & drum out with some tunes from Rob Zombie on Playstation 3 and Xbox 360. Finally, foreign horror gives us an over-the-top Japanese gorefest, a British zombie flick where the $70 budget was spent on tea and biscuits for the zombies, and Norwegian black metal.

Predators

Directed by Nimród Antal

Robert Rodriguez presents Predators (review), a bold new chapter in the Predator universe. Adrien Brody stars as Royce, a mercenary who reluctantly leads a group of elite warriors mysteriously brought together on a jungle planet.
See full article at Dread Central »
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