Les Bonnes Femmes (1960) - News Poster

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Criterion Collection: La Vérité (1960) | Blu-ray Review

What is the truth? And can you handle it? Notions of truth, perspective and judgment have long been staples of the courtroom drama, melded into specific social commentary concerning the cultural disparity between a country’s elders and its youth in Henri-Georges Clouzot’s late-career masterstroke, La Vérité. Released in 1960, where it would go on to nab an Academy Award nomination and win a Golden Globe, this was Clouzot’s last great hurrah, as the troubled production of 1964’s Inferno was never completed, while one final title in 1968 with La Prisonniere fell into immediate obscurity.

Arriving just as the Nouvelle Vague was redefining the stylistic possibilities of cinema, with Chabrol’s Les Bonnes Femmes, Truffaut’s The 400 Blows and Godard’s Breathless all arriving at or around the same time, Clouzot’s last notable hit stresses the divide of his classical filmmaking style with the topicality of a new generation.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Ophélia

New Wave director Claude Chabrol goes off in an odd direction with this Francophone adaptation of Hamlet. Convinced that his father was murdered, the heir to an estate behaves like a madman as he sets out to unmask the killers. The ‘castle’ is a country manse guarded by thugs as a precaution against the signeur’s striking union workers. Special added attraction: the stars to see are Alida Valli and Juliette Mayniel of Eyes without a Face.

Ophélia

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1963 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 104 min. / Street Date April 25, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.95

Starring: Alida Valli, Juliette Mayniel, Claude Cerval, André Jocelyn, Robert Burnier, Jean-Louis Maury, Sacha Briquet, Liliane Dreyfus (David), Pierre Vernier.

Cinematography: Jacques Rabier, Jean Rabier

Film Editor: Jacques Gaillard

Original Music: Pierre Jansen

Written by Claude Chabrol, Paul Gégauff, Martial Matthieu from a play by William Shakespeare

Produced and Directed by Claude Chabrol

I suppose
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

3 Classic Films by Claude Chabrol

Being called the French Hitchcock does Claude Chabrol a disservice, as his dark thrillers approach mystery and suspense almost completely through character, not cinematics. These three very good 1990s productions are completely different in tone and approach, and each showcases a stunning French actress.

Betty, Torment (L’enfer), The Swindle (Rien ne vas plus)

Blu-ray

3 Classic Films by Claude Chabrol

Cohen Film Collection

1992,1994,1997 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 103, 102, 105 min. / Street Date February 21, 2017 / 49.99

Starring Marie Trintignant, Stéphane Audran, Jean-François Garreaud, Yves Lambrecht; Emmanuelle Béart, François Cluzet, Nathalie Cardone, Dora Doll; Isabelle Huppert, Michel Serrault, François Cluzet, Jean-François Balmer.

Cinematography: Bernard Zitermann; Bernard Zitermann, Eduardo Serra

Film Editor: Monique Fardoulis (x3)

Original Music: Matthieu Chabrol (x3)

Written by Claude Chabrol from a novel by Georges Simenon; Claude Chabrol from a script by Henri-Georges Clouzot; Claude Chabrol

Produced by Marin Karmitz (x3)

Directed by Claude Chabrol (x3)

Not all Claude Chabrol films are equal, but
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Femme Western Short ‘The Good Time Girls’ Gallops Into Production With Quentin Tarantino As Ep

Femme Western Short ‘The Good Time Girls’ Gallops Into Production With Quentin Tarantino As Ep
Exclusive: Principal photography is underway for Courtney Hoffman’s feminist western short The Good Time Girls from Haven Entertainment. Hoffman writes, Quentin Tarantino executive produces and Laura Dern stars in this 1880s tale about three female vigilantes who seek revenge against the outlaws who ruined their lives. Alia Shawkat, Annalise Baso, Q'orianka Kitcher, Garret Dillahunt, and Dana Gourier also star. There are plans to ultimately turn this short into a feature…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Daily | Goings On | New York and Beyond

With bittersweet anticipation, we look forward to the final seven episodes of Mad Men's final season. Matthew Weiner has selected "ten movies that had an important influence" on the show for a series running at the Museum of the Moving Image—and he's written the descriptions for each himself: Alfred Hitchcock's North by Northwest and Vertigo, Billy Wilder's The Apartment, David Lynch's Blue Velvet, Claude Chabrol's Les Bonnes Femmes, Fielder Cook's Patterns, Delbert Mann's Dear Heart and The Bachelor Party, Jean Negulesco's The Best of Everything and Arthur Hiller's The Americanization of Emily. Today's entry features more goings on in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, London, Venice and beyond. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Goings On | New York and Beyond

With bittersweet anticipation, we look forward to the final seven episodes of Mad Men's final season. Matthew Weiner has selected "ten movies that had an important influence" on the show for a series running at the Museum of the Moving Image—and he's written the descriptions for each himself: Alfred Hitchcock's North by Northwest and Vertigo, Billy Wilder's The Apartment, David Lynch's Blue Velvet, Claude Chabrol's Les Bonnes Femmes, Fielder Cook's Patterns, Delbert Mann's Dear Heart and The Bachelor Party, Jean Negulesco's The Best of Everything and Arthur Hiller's The Americanization of Emily. Today's entry features more goings on in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, London, Venice and beyond. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Bernadette Lafont

Actor with a natural and rebellious style, she helped to launch the French New Wave

Bernadette Lafont, who has died aged 74, could have claimed to be the first female star of the Nouvelle Vague. François Truffaut chose the sensual, dark-haired, 18-year-old Lafont and her new husband, Gérard Blain, to play lovers in the director's first professional film, Les Mistons (The Mischief-Makers, 1957). In this charming short, shot in Nîmes one summer, a group of pubescent boys spy on Lafont and Blain's lovemaking in the fields. Blain and Lafont were also picked to appear in arguably the first French New Wave feature, Claude Chabrol's Le Beau Serge (1958). In this film, about a young man returning to his childhood home, Lafont played the "village vamp".

Lafont's fresh look and performance style crystallised the movement's ideological and cinematic ambitions. Truffaut and his colleagues found mainstream stars inadequate to their needs, using instead unknown and non-professional actors,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

“Beloved” — A Hammer To Nail Review

(Beloved world premiered at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival and was picked up for distribution by IFC Films. It opens theatrically on August 17, 2012. Visit the film’s website to learn more.)

Beloved, the latest film from French writer/director Christophe Honoré, uses the history of the late 20th century as a framework for exploring the difficult love affairs of a mother, Madeleine (played as a young woman by Ludivine Sagnier and as an older woman by Catherine Deneuve) and her daughter, Vera (Chiarra Mastroianni). Like much of Honoré’s work, the movie is rich with allusions not only to literary and theatrical forms, but to the history of the cinema itself; opening in a Parisian shoe store in 1964, it takes Honoré only a few moments to reference The Umbrellas of Cherbourg, Cléo From 5 To 7 and Les Bonnes Femmes before, in a single beat, spinning directly into a nod to Belle Du Jour.
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Netflix Nuggets: Who’s Up For a Miramax Marathon?

Netflix has revolutionized the home movie experience for fans of film with its instant streaming technology. Netflix Nuggets is my way of spreading the word about independent, classic and foreign films made available by Netflix for instant streaming.

Sorry, folks… there are simply too many great films streaming this week to post an image for them all, but that’s a good thing, eh? You’ve got your movie watching work cut out for you, due in great part to Miramax releasing damn near their entire catalog of films on one day!

B. Monkey (1999)

Streaming Available: 05/01/2011

Director: Michael Radford

Synopsis: Good-hearted schoolteacher Alan Furnace (Jared Harris) desperately wants some excitement in his life — and he may just get some. One lonely night at a London bar, Alan spies the raven-haired beauty Beatrice (Asia Argento) arguing with two friends, Paul (Rupert Everett) and Bruno (Jonathan Rhys-Meyers). Beatrice quickly befriends Alan and
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

City of Lights, City of Angels 2011

  • MUBI
The 15th City of Lights, City of Angels, a festival with both a handy acronym, Col•Coa, and a winning subtitle, "A Week of French Film Premieres in Hollywood," has opened with Philippe Le Guay's Service Entrance and closes on Sunday with Dany Boon's Nothing to Declare. In all, 34 features and 26 shorts will be screened, and we're teaming up with the festival to present five of those shorts for free. All five have been made by students of La fémis in Paris (whose alumni, by the way, include Laurent Cantet, Costa-Gavras, Claire Denis, Louis Malle, Arnaud Desplechin, Claude Miller, François Ozon and Alain Resnais). You can view our offering here.

In Brice Pancot's À cor et à cir (image above), a woman who's just turned her car over is discovered by a man and his son; see the teaser here. In Marion Desseigne-Ravel's Uniform (Les Murs
See full article at MUBI »

David Thomson on Claude Chabrol

Claude Chabrol is the kind of figure who could be reclaimed after death – there are some films that might look much better years later

Nearly 50 years ago, Claude Chabrol – who died last weekend – wrote an essay, Big Subjects, Little Subjects, in which he set out an attitude to movies and a guide to his own career (which had only just begun). "You can make a film about the French Revolution, or a squabble with the next-door neighbour, the apocalypse of our time or how the barmaid became pregnant, the last hours of a hero of the Resistance, or the inquest on a murdered prostitute. It's all a question of personality."

If you wanted to demonstrate this theory in defence of modesty, you could point to Madame Bovary (1991), where despite the presence of Isabelle Huppert in the title role, Chabrol seems a little overawed or diffident with the material. If only
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Claude Chabrol obituary

Prolific French director of films with murder at their heart

The film director Claude Chabrol, who has died aged 80, created the first ripple of the French new wave with his first feature, Le Beau Serge (1958). Unlike some of his other critic colleagues on the influential journal Cahiers du Cinéma, who also became film-makers, Chabrol was perfectly happy in the mainstream. Along with Jean-Luc Godard, François Truffaut, Eric Rohmer and Jacques Rivette, he paid serious attention to Hollywood studio contract directors who retained their artistic personalities through good and bad films, thus formulating what came to be known as the "auteur theory".

In 1957, he and Rohmer wrote a short book on Alfred Hitchcock, whom they saw as a Catholic moralist. Hitchcock's black humour and fascination with guilt pervades the majority of Chabrol's films, most of which have murder at their heart. However, although Chabrol's thematic allegiance to Hitchcock remained intact, his
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Claude Chabrol: a career in clips

The French New Wave veteran has died aged 80. We look back over his career with a selection of clips from his films

Along with François Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard, Claude Chabrol ushered in the New Wave that washed over French cinema at the end of the 1950s. Like them a critic turned filmmaker, Chabrol shared their appreciation of classical genre form – to some, he appreciated it too much, exploring rather than subverting its strictures. But his prodigious output and technical mastery assure his place as one of the great figures of cinema's first century.

Born in 1930 to a middle-class family, Chabrol studied law before joining Godard, Truffaut, Eric Rohmer and Jacques Rivette in making Cahiers du Cinema, the epicentre of auteurist celebration of 'low' Hollywood. In 1957, he and Rohmer published their influential study of Hitchcock – a director who would have an enduring influence on Chabrol's work behind the camera – and,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Claude Chabrol anatomised the French middle class with a twist of the scalpel

Peter Bradshaw on the French New Wave figure who out-Hitchcocked Hitchcock with his hypocrisy-exposing suspense thrillers

For 30 years after the death of Alfred Hitchcock, the French film-maker Claude Chabrol near single-handedly kept alive a genre that without him might have become a museum piece, like the musical or the western: the icily elegant suspense thriller. The existence of these tense dramas depended largely on a strict set of social codes, a strong sense of order and a buttoned-up bourgeois society within which the idea of crime is unthinkable.

Yet the genre's dramatic charge depends not merely on the chill of transgression, but on the realisation that with sufficient ruthlessness, or ingenuity, or social privilege, some crime or psychopathic outrage might be concealed and fester, unseen, for ever.

Perhaps it is telling that Hitchcock was an Englishman; Chabrol found something in French society that was highly congenial to the suspense genre,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Claude Chabrol 1930-2010

Claude Chabrol 1930-2010
Claude Chabrol, one of the founding players of the French New Wave, and the director of more than fifty films, has died in Paris, aged 80.Starting out as a pharmaclogist at the University of Paris, he was drawn to the cinema, and like his nouvelle vague contemporaries Francois Truffault, Jean-Luc Godard, Eric Rohmer, Alain Resnais and Jacques Rivette, was a critic for the seminal French film magazine Cahiers du Cinema.His Les Bonnes Femmes was one of the earliest films of the nouvelle vague: an intriguing mix of romantic comedy and psychological horror. But as the most "commercial" of his contemporaries, it was for his thrillers, poking around in the rotten core of bourgeois society, that he became most revered. At the fall of the Berlin Wall, he said that he'd read it meant the end of class war, and commented "only someone with money would say such a thing". His hero was Alfred Hitchcock,
See full article at EmpireOnline »

Claude Chabrol, Rip. The death of a master

Claude Chabrol, who died Sunday, Sept. 12 at 80, was a founder of the New Wave and a giant of French cinema. This interview, which took place during the 1970 New York Film Festival, shows him at midpoint in his life, just as he had emerged from a period of neglect and was making some of his best films.

Claude Chabrol's "This Man Must Die" is advertised as a thriller, but I found it more of a macabre study of human behavior. There's no doubt as to the villain's identity, and little doubt that he will die (although how he dies is left deliciously ambiguous).

Unlike previous masters of thrillers like Hitchcock, Chabrol goes for mood and tone more than for plot. You get the notion that his killings and revenges are choreographed for a terribly observant camera and an ear that hears the slightest change in human speech.

For this reason,
See full article at Roger Ebert's Blog »

R.I.P. Claude Chabrol (1930-2010)

Renowned French filmmaker Claude Chabrol has passed away today aged 80. Beginning his career as a film critic alongside contemporaries Jean-Luc Godard, Jacques Rivette, Eric Rohmer and François Truffaut with the influential French film magazine Cahiers du Cinéma, Chabrol helped to usher in the French New Wave with his self-financed debut feature Le beau Serge in 1959. He followed this up with a series of arthouse films including Les Cousins (1959), Les Bonnes Femmes (1960) and Les Godelureaux (1961) before shifting to more commercial material in the mid-60s such as the spy thrillers Le Tigre aime la chair fraiche (1964) and Le tigre se parfume à la dynamite (1965).

Heavily influenced by acclaimed British director Alfred Hitchcock (he had co-authored the 1957 study Hitchcock alongside Eric Rohmer), Chabrol began to develop his signature "Chabrol-esque" style in a series of Hitchcock-inspired suspense thrillers and critically acclaimed dramas including Le Scandale (1967), Les Biches (1968), La Femme infidèle (1969) and Le Boucher
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

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