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The Complete Monterey Pop Festival

Criterion lavishes a major upgrade to its older box set celebrating the first major rock concert event, the ‘California Dreamin’ idyll that some say marked the beginning of the Summer of Love. Get ready to hear and see some history-making performances from Big Brother and the Holding Company, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, and The Who. Plus two more features and a bundle of ‘extra’ music sets . . . including Tiny Tim.

The Complete Monterey Pop Festival

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 167

1968 / Color / 1:33 flat / 79 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date December 12, 2017 / 69.95

Cinematography: James Desmond, Barry Feinstein, Richard Leacock, Albert Maysles, Roger Murphy, D.A. Pennebaker

Film Editor: Nina Schulman

Original Music: The Animals, The Association, Big Brother and the Holding Company, The Byrds, Canned Heat, Country Joe and the Fish, Jimi Hendrix Experience, Al Kooper, Hugh Masekela, Jefferson Airplane, The Mamas and the Papas, Laura Nyro, Otis Redding, The Quicksilver Messenger Service,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Joshua Reviews Pablo Larrain’s Jackie [Theatrical Review]

“I believe the characters we read about on the page become more real than the men who stand beside us.”

As trite as this sentiment may seem at first glance, the latest film from director Pablo Larrain finds this focus on mythology and the building of myth in the public eye utterly thrilling. And so will anyone who watches Jackie.

Starring Natalie Portman in possibly a career-defining performance (Black Swan fans don’t find me on Twitter, I love the film as well), Jackie tells the story of a brief moment in the life of former first lady of these United States Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, the lead up to and fall out from the assassination of her iconic husband. We don’t see her as a child, we don’t watch her near the end of her life, as with any good biopic this film simply focuses on one brief
See full article at CriterionCast »

Which Movie President Would You Vote For? — Critics Survey

Which Movie President Would You Vote For? — Critics Survey
Every week, the CriticWire Survey asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday morning. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: As you may be aware, America is fixing to elect a new President later this year. If you could cast your vote this November for any movie President (real or fictional), who would it be and why?

Christopher Campbell (@thefilmcynic), Nonfics/Film School Rejects

If I had to choose fictional, I’d go with Jackson Evans in “The Contender.” He comes off as so perfect that he’s clearly just a product of the movies. But I can choose someone real, so I go with the John F. Kennedy of “Primary” and “Crisis: Behind a Presidential Commitment” (and the Drew
See full article at Indiewire »

Criterion Close-Up – Episode 39 – The War Room & Politics in Film

Aaron is joined by Keith Enright for a discussion of politics, new and old, through the lens of The War Room (1993), the behind-the scenes 1992 Clinton campaign documentary. We go into depth about the backroom politics and how those are what defines the campaign, but are usually far from the public eye. We contrast the politics of today and yesterday by looking the current affairs and Robert Drew’s Primary.

About the film:

The 1992 presidential election was a triumph not only for Bill Clinton but also for the new breed of strategists who guided him to the White House—and changed the face of politics in the process. For this thrilling, behind-closed-doors account of that campaign, renowned cinema verité filmmakers Chris Hegedus and D. A. Pennebaker captured the brainstorming and bull sessions of Clinton’s crack team of consultants—especially James Carville and George Stephanopoulos, who became media stars in their
See full article at CriterionCast »

6 Filmmaking Tips From Documentary Pioneers Robert Drew and Richard Leacock

Robert Drew‘s name is attached to a team of filmmakers who made revolutionary changes to documentary in the early 1960s. But today he’s probably the least-appreciated member of Drew Associates and the Direct Cinema movement after Albert Maysles, D.A. Pennebaker, and Ricky Leacock. Part of that is because he never became as well-known a solo director as his colleagues. He didn’t go on to make more revered classics like the Maysles Brothers’ Salesman and Grey Gardens or Pennebaker’s Don’t Look Back and The War Room, and he didn’t have the kind of film history-spanning career and influence that Leacock’s legacy entails. That’s why Criterion’s new set “The Kennedy Films of Robert Drew & Associates” is so important. Not that it totally isolates Drew from the others — he barely gets to stand out alone even in the new bonus-feature documentary Robert Drew in His Own Words — but it at least
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

The Kennedy Films of Robert Drew & Associates

Take a look at the roots of American campaign image consciousness, and the then-new techniques of cinéma vérité to bring a new 'reality' for film documentaries. Four groundbreaking films cover the Kennedy-Humphrey presidential primary, and put us in the Oval Office for a showdown against Alabama governor George Wallace. The Kennedy Films of Robert Drew & Associates Blu-ray Primary, Adventures on the New Frontier, Crisis: Behind a Presidential Commitment, Faces of November The Criterion Collection 808 1960 -1964 / B&W / 1:33 flat full frame / 53, 52, 53, 12 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date April 26, 2016 / 39.95 Starring John F. Kennedy, Robert F. Kennedy, Jacqueline Kennedy, Robert Drew, Hubert H. Humphrey, McGeorge Bundy, John Kenneth Galbraith, Richard Goodwin, Albert Gore Sr., Eunice Kennedy Shriver, Pierre Salinger, Haile Selassie, John Steinbeck, George Wallace, Vivian Malone, Burke Marshall, Nicholas Katzenbach, John Dore, Jack Greenberg; Lyndon Johnson, John Kennedy Jr., Caroline Kennedy, Peter Lawford. Cinematography Richard Leacock, Albert Maysles, D.A. Pennebaker,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Review: “The Kennedy Films Of Robert Drew & Associates”, Blu-ray Special Edition From Criterion

  • CinemaRetro
“The President’S Reality Show

By Raymond Benson

Robert Drew was a pioneer who changed the way we think about the documentary film. As first a writer/editor at Life Magazine in the 1950s, and then the head of a unit that produced short documentaries for Time Inc., Drew knew how to tell a story visually. When he formed his own company, Robert Drew & Associates, he was the guiding force for other talented (and later, more well-known) filmmakers such as D. A. Pennebaker (Don’t Look Back, Monterey Pop), Albert and David Maysles (Gimme Shelter), and Richard Leacock, among others. Together they invented a novel way to present a documentary film, something historians coined “direct cinema.”

Documentaries had previously been scripted, usually shot to order, and more often than not, were textbook dull. Drew and his colleagues developed the you-are-there style of following subjects around as they did their business,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

2016 Sundance Film Festival: Eric Lavallee’s Top 5 Most Anticipated Films

Unlike some other media outlets who are blasphemously drawing up “most anticipated” Sundance lists that come across as a simple rehash of the entire feature film line-up, over here, Nicholas Bell and I pare down this shared enthusiasm in what are individual must see top five lists. The catch: select five films from five sections. In the decade I’ve been coming down here, the U.S Dramatic Comp section was the sure-fire bet for treasures, the Premieres section offered heavyweights and misfires while you had to look elsewhere for the gems. Last year’s Next was where all the riches were at. James White, Entertainment, Tangerine , Nasty Baby, and the upcoming Take Me to the River reminded me why the Next section has become a robust category in itself but surprisingly it might be the Premieres program (half a dozen offerings I could easily see in Cannes) is poised to get the major attention.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Kino Lorber Acquires North American Rights To Les Blank & Gina Leibrecht’s How To Smell A Rose: A Visit With Ricky Leacock In Normandy

Kino Lorber is proud to announce the acquisition of all North American rights to Les Blank & Gina Leibrecht‘s How To Smell A Rose: A Visit With Ricky Leacock In Normandy, a moving tribute by one cinema verité master to another.

Opening at New York’s Film Forum on Wednesday, August 12, 2015, How To Smell Of Rose: A Visit With Ricky Leacock In Normandy was co-directed by Les Blank and his longtime creative partner, Gina Leibrecht. How To Smell A Rose: A Visit With Ricky Leacock is the penultimate film directed by Les Blank, before he passed away on April 7, 2013.

During its theatrical run at Film Forum, How To Smell A Rose will be screened with the Leacock-Joyce Chopra classic, Happy Mother’S Day, on the 1963 birth of the Fischer quintuplets in Aberdeen, South Dakota. In further national theatrical engagements “Rose” will be presented with Les Blank’s now classic
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Kino Lorber Acquires Les Blank's Penultimate Doc 'How to Smell a Rose'

Kino Lorber Acquires Les Blank's Penultimate Doc 'How to Smell a Rose'
Read More: SXSW: Les Blank's Leon Russell Doc Gets a Proper Premiere and a Trippy New Poster Les Blank and longtime collaborator Gina Leibrecht's documentary "How to Smell a Rose: A Visit with Ricky Leacock in Normandy" has been acquired by Kino Lorber.  The film paints a portrait of the British documentarian and his partner Valerie Lalonde while in France. It features clips of Leacock's films. One such film, "Primary," follows the 1960 Wisconsin Primary election between John F. Kennedy and Hubert Humphrey. "Canary Bananas," also featured in the documentary, was made by Leacock at 14 years old on his father's Canary Island plantation.  "How to Smell a Rose" will be screened at art house theaters and film festivals during the fall, followed by a VOD and home media release.  Read More: Leon Russell Gets Reflective at 'A Poem is a Naked Person' NYC Opening
See full article at Indiewire »

Tonight on TCM: Watch Albert Maysles essential films

Back at the start of March, the world of film lost one of its most revered documentarians, Albert Maysles. He and his brother David made three of Sight & Sound’s Top 50 Documentaries of all time, and to pay tribute to the late director, Turner Classic Movies is tonight changing their schedule to air three of those films, along with one of his early shorts.

TCM’s Albert Maysles Memorial Tribute will air Grey Gardens, Salesman, Gimme Shelter, and Meet Marlon Brando, starting at 8 Pm Et tonight. We first reported on the series back in our film Week in Review. Here’s the schedule:

TCM Remembers Albert Maysles– Monday, March 23

8 Pm Grey Gardens (1976)

10:00 Pm Salesman (1968)

11:45 Pm Gimme Shelter (1970)

1:30 Am Meet Marlon Brando (1968)

Grey Gardens recently received a restoration via the Criterion Collection, while the controversial Gimme Shelter is an absolute must-see and pinnacle of music history, ranking along
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Rewind: Robert Drew and a Whole New Way of Seeing

Editor's note: Robert Drew passed away today at age ninety. We revisit a 2003 interview with the filmmaker. Wisconsin, 1960. An unlikely setting perhaps for one of the most crucial showdowns in the wide-open race for the presidency. The Democrats had to decide whom to nominate to run against Richard Nixon. John F. Kennedy realized that if he beat Hubert Humphrey in the Wisconsin primary (and if he could prove that a Catholic senator from New England could triumph over a Protestant senator from a neighboring state), he could also prove his national appeal. It's quite a story and Primary tells it like no documentary ever had before.>> - Jonathan Marlow
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Rewind: Robert Drew and a Whole New Way of Seeing

Editor's note: Robert Drew passed away today at age ninety. We revisit a 2003 interview with the filmmaker. Wisconsin, 1960. An unlikely setting perhaps for one of the most crucial showdowns in the wide-open race for the presidency. The Democrats had to decide whom to nominate to run against Richard Nixon. John F. Kennedy realized that if he beat Hubert Humphrey in the Wisconsin primary (and if he could prove that a Catholic senator from New England could triumph over a Protestant senator from a neighboring state), he could also prove his national appeal. It's quite a story and Primary tells it like no documentary ever had before.>> - Jonathan Marlow
See full article at Keyframe »

R.I.P. Robert Drew, Pioneer Of American Cinema Verite

R.I.P. Robert Drew, Pioneer Of American Cinema Verite
The documentary filmmaker who was called the “father of American cinema verite” died today at his home in Sharon, Conn. Robert Drew was 90. He was a Life magazine correspondent and editor when he formed Drew Associates in 1960 and hired a team of filmmakers that included then-unknowns D.A. Pennebaker, Albert Maysles and Ricky Leacock. Their first project was Primary, which followed handsome young senator John F. Kennedy as he campaigned in Wisconsin for the 1960 Democratic presidential nomination. Starting with Primary, Drew’s films pioneered a new journalistically minded code of documentary creation, including not directing subjects or using set-up shots or […]
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Daily | Robert Drew, 1924 – 2014

Documentary filmmaker Robert Drew, widely regarded as "the father of American cinéma vérité," has died at the age of 90. As Vadim Rizov writes at Filmmaker, "It’s not oversimplifying to note that Drew’s Primary (covering the JFK-Hubert Humphrey faceoff in the 1960 Wisconsin primary) and Crisis: Behind a Presidential Commitment (examining the administration’s standoff against segregationist George Wallace) are two of the key documents of the Kennedy presidency, whose levels of candor, access and good judgment about where to point the camera when remain startlingly fresh." » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Daily | Robert Drew, 1924 – 2014

Documentary filmmaker Robert Drew, widely regarded as "the father of American cinéma vérité," has died at the age of 90. As Vadim Rizov writes at Filmmaker, "It’s not oversimplifying to note that Drew’s Primary (covering the JFK-Hubert Humphrey faceoff in the 1960 Wisconsin primary) and Crisis: Behind a Presidential Commitment (examining the administration’s standoff against segregationist George Wallace) are two of the key documents of the Kennedy presidency, whose levels of candor, access and good judgment about where to point the camera when remain startlingly fresh." » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

R.I.P Robert Drew

A press release prepared by documentarian Robert Drew’s family announced his death today at age 90. Drew is remembered as a pioneer of cinéma vérité — now a term thrown around carelessly to denote just about any documentary assembled without talking heads or a narrator, which is a radical oversimplification of vérité’s possibilities. It’s not oversimplifying to note that Drew’s Primary (covering the JFK-Hubert Humphrey faceoff in the 1960 Wisconsin primary) and Crisis: Behind a Presidential Commitment (examining the administration’s standoff against segregationist George Wallace) are two of the key documents of the Kennedy presidency, whose levels of candor, access […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

R.I.P Robert Drew

A press release prepared by documentarian Robert Drew’s family announced his death today at age 90. Drew is remembered as a pioneer of cinéma vérité — now a term thrown around carelessly to denote just about any documentary assembled without talking heads or a narrator, which is a radical oversimplification of vérité’s possibilities. It’s not oversimplifying to note that Drew’s Primary (covering the JFK-Hubert Humphrey faceoff in the 1960 Wisconsin primary) and Crisis: Behind a Presidential Commitment (examining the administration’s standoff against segregationist George Wallace) are two of the key documents of the Kennedy presidency, whose levels of candor, access […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Albert Maysles: The Hollywood Interview

Albert Maysles: Gimme Some Truth

By

Alex Simon

I'm sick and tired of hearing things/From uptight, short-sighted, narrow-minded hypocritics/All I want is the truth/Just gimme some truth/I've had enough of reading things/By neurotic, psychotic, pig-headed politicians/All I want is the truth/Just gimme some truth. – John Lennon

Albert and David Maysles are generally regarded as the fathers of the modern American documentary film. Beginning in the early 1960s, their pioneering work with contemporaries such as Robert Drew, Richard Leacock and D.A. Pennebaker helped launch the “Direct Cinema” movement, devoted to capturing real life as closely as possible, in all its unscripted reality. Today, filmmakers like Michael Moore, reality TV and every news magazine on the air and on the web can trace their linage back to the Maysles brothers.

Their three defining features: Salesman (1968), a sobering and often hilarious look at the lives
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

'Cold Case JFK,' 'Secrets of the Dead': JFK assassination anniversary specials

On Nov. 22, America marks the 50th anniversary of the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy - and television is giving viewers plenty to think about.

"Nova: Cold Case JFK" (PBS, Wednesday, Nov. 13): With a nod to the enduring conspiracy theories surrounding the assassination, the science series enlists modern investigators with state-of-the-art forensic tools to see if they can do a better job sorting out the evidence than was done in the '60s.

"Secrets of the Dead: JFK: One Pm Central Standard Time" (PBS, Wednesday): CBS news footage chronicles the assassination minute by minute, including Walter Cronkite's emotional report of Kennedy's death.

"Letters to Jackie: Remembering President Kennedy" (TLC, Nov. 17): Actors including Laura Linney and John Krasinski bring to life some of the condolence letters written to Jacqueline Kennedy after her husband's death.

"Where Were You? The Day JFK Died Reported by Tom Brokaw" (NBC,
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »
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