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Bruce Dern movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Coming Home,’ ‘Nebraska,’ ‘The Great Gatsby’

  • Gold Derby
Bruce Dern movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Coming Home,’ ‘Nebraska,’ ‘The Great Gatsby’
Bruce Dern celebrates his 83rd birthday on June 4, 2019. The two-time Oscar nominee shows no signs of slowing down, and he’s got several upcoming projects including a role in Quentin Tarantino‘s “Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood.” But how many of his titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1936, Dern made his film debut with an uncredited appearance in Elia Kazan‘s “Wild River” (1960). He popped up in a number of supporting roles throughout the decade, making a name for himself in exploitation films produced by low-budget king Roger Corman.

SEEJane Fonda movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

Dern hit his stride in the 1970s, when a number of offbeat-looking performers suddenly became leading men. He earned his first Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actor for Hal Ashby‘s
See full article at Gold Derby »

Bruce Dern movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Bruce Dern movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Bruce Dern celebrates his 83rd birthday on June 4, 2019. The two-time Oscar nominee shows no signs of slowing down, and he’s got several upcoming projects including a role in Quentin Tarantino‘s “Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood.” But how many of his titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1936, Dern made his film debut with an uncredited appearance in Elia Kazan‘s “Wild River” (1960). He popped up in a number of supporting roles throughout the decade, making a name for himself in exploitation films produced by low-budget king Roger Corman.

Dern hit his stride in the 1970s, when a number of offbeat-looking performers suddenly became leading men. He earned his first Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actor for Hal Ashby‘s Vietnam War drama “Coming Home” (1978), playing a Ptsd-afflicted marine whose
See full article at Gold Derby »

Wanda

The work of a great, original, natural filmmaker, Wanda continues to confound viewers that don’t recognize honest human reality when they see it. A woman dispossessed, uprooted and adrift no longer has a self-definition, just a basic drive to subsist and find someone who values her. Morals? It’s hard enough just to survive. Director-actress Barbara Loden isn’t Wanda, yet she is — her film erases the distinctions between movies, theater and reality, something John Cassavetes never quite accomplished.

Wanda

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 965

1970 / Color / 1:37 flat Academy / 103 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date March 19, 2019 / 39.95

Starring: Barbara Loden, Michael Higgins, Jerome Thier, Jack Ford.

Cinematography, Editing: Nicholas T. Proferes

Produced by Harry Shuster

Directed by Barbara Loden

Consciously or unconsciously, most American movies pre: 1970 promote the status quo success story. People living below middle-class status were often patronized; in many socially-conscious movies they were either problem cases or overly sentimentalized,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Valley Girl

One of the oldies celebrated by lovers of ’80s fare, Martha Coolidge’s ode to pampered teens in La La Land has aged extremely well. It’s still fairly representative of reality, but the romantic fairy tale angle is what keeps it afloat. Nicolas Cage’s unguarded vulnerability and Deborah Foreman’s infectious smile win the day — we like these kids, even if they’re somewhat idealized.

Valley Girl

Blu-ray

Shout Select

1983 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 99 min. / Street Date October 30, 2018 / 34.93

Starring: Nicolas Cage, Deborah Foreman, Elizabeth Daily, Michael Bowen, Cameron Dye, Heidi Holicker, Michelle Meyrink, Tina Theberge, Lee Purcell, Richard Sanders, Colleen Camp, Frederic Forrest, David Ensor, The Plimsouls, Josie Cotton.

Cinematography: Frederick Elmes

Film Editor: Éva Gárdos

Original Music: Mark Levinthal, Scott Wilk

Produced and Written by Andrew Lane, Wayne Crawford

Directed by Martha Coolidge

Women directors of the 1980s didn’t have a smooth ride, as can be attested
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Montgomery Clift movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘A Place in the Sun,’ ‘From Here to Eternity’

  • Gold Derby
Montgomery Clift movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘A Place in the Sun,’ ‘From Here to Eternity’
Montgomery Clift would’ve celebrated his 98th birthday on October 17, 2018. The iconic actor gave only a small number of onscreen performances before his untimely death in 1966 at the age of 45. Yet several of those titles remain classics. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

A product of the Actor’s Studio, where he studied under Lee Strasberg and Elia Kazan, Clift had a successful Broadway career before moving to Hollywood. Among his notable stage credits was the role of Henry in Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer Prize-winning “The Skin of Our Teeth.” Like James Dean and Marlon Brando, he was one of the original method actors, calling upon past memories and experiences to inform his performances.

He came to the attention of movie audiences in 1948 with a pair of releases: Howard Hawks‘ western “Red River” and Fred Zinnemann‘s WWII drama “The Search.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Elia Kazan movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘A Streetcar Named Desire,’ ‘On the Waterfront’

  • Gold Derby
Elia Kazan movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘A Streetcar Named Desire,’ ‘On the Waterfront’
Elia Kazan would have celebrated his 109th birthday on September 7, 2018. Years after his death in 2003, the two-time Oscar-winning director remains both an influential and controversial figure, respected and reviled in equal measure. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Kazan started his career as a stage actor, soon transitioning into directing. He mounted several landmark productions, including the original run of “A Streetcar Named Desire.” Throughout his career he received three Tony awards for Best Director of a Play: “All My Sons” in 1947, “Death of a Salesman” in 1949, and “J.B.” in 1959.

He transitioned into filmmaking with “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” (1945). Two years later, he won his first Oscar for Best Director for “Gentleman’s Agreement” (1947), which also took home Best Picture and Best Supporting Actress (Celeste Holm). A taboo-shattering drama about antisemitism, the film established
See full article at Gold Derby »

Martin Scorsese Says His Next Film The Irishman Has Almost 300 Scenes!

Martin Scorsese isn't messing around with his new film The Irishman. He's going all out on this sucker and he shot almost 300 scenes for the film to prove it! In case you're wondering... that's a lot of scenes! That makes The Irishman the biggest production of his career and we probably won't even get to see it on the big screen! As you know, The Irishman is a Netflix exclusive. An average number of scenes shot for a film ranges from 40 to 60 scenes, so this movie is going to be epic.

Scorsese is certainly taking advantage of the opportunity that Netflix has given him and by the time the film is done, he will have spent over $140 million. A good chunk of that money is going to the effects department who are using CGI to digitally de-age several of the actors in the film including Robert De Niro, who stars
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Nine new Lego City 2018 sets revealed

Last month we brought you a look at several of the upcoming Lego City 2018 sets [check them out here], and now a batch of promotional images have arrived online for another nine sets due to hit shelves over the coming months; check them out here…

See Also: First Lego Creator 2018 sets revealed

Off-Road Chase (60170)

Mountain Fugitives (60171)

Mountain Police Headquarters (60174)

Wild River Escape (60176)

Airshow Jet (60177)

Speed Record Car (60178)

Mining Team (60184)

Mining Heavy Driller (60186)

Mining Experts Site (60188)

See Also: Follow all of our Lego coverage here

The post Nine new Lego City 2018 sets revealed appeared first on Flickering Myth.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Hour of the Gun

It’s the one saga of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral that puts Western legend into proper perspective as to the nature of money, power and the law: Edward Anhalt’s vision is of a gangland turf war with sagebrush and whiskey bottles. James Garner is a humorless Wyatt Earp, matched by Jason Robards’ excellent Doc Holliday. It’s one of John Sturges’ best movies.

Hour of the Gun

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1967 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 101 min. / Street Date September 19, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: James Garner, Jason Robards, Robert Ryan, Albert Salmi, Charles Aidman, Steve Ihnat, Michael Tolan, William Windom, Lonny Chapman, Larry Gates, William Schallert, Jon Voight.

Cinematography: Lucien Ballard

Art Direction: Alfred C. Ybarra

Film Editor: Ferris Webster

Original Music: Jerry Goldsmith

Written by Edward Anhalt

Produced and Directed by John Sturges

Producer-director John SturgesHour of the Gun was a dismal non-performer in
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Big Sick

This modern romantic comedy about stand-up comedians generates a genuine warmth about people, the ones-who-need-people kind. Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon’s comic dramatization of the way they became a couple is a big winner, with heart-tugging performances from Nanjiani and Zoe Kazan, and fine characterizations by Holly Hunter, Zenobia Shroff, Ray Romano, and Anupam Kher.

The Big Sick

Blu-ray + DVD

Lionsgate

2017 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 120 min. / Street Date September 19, 2017 / 39.99

Starring: Kumail Nanjiani, Zoe Kazan, Holly Hunter, Ray Romano, Anupam Kher, Zenobia Shroff, Adeel Akhtar, Bo Burnham, Aidy Bryant, Kurt Braunohler, Vella Lovell.

Cinematography: Brian Burgoyne

Film Editor: Robert Nassau

Original Music: Michael Andrews

Written by Emily V. Gordon, Kumail Nanjiani

Produced by Judd Apatow, Barry Mendel

Directed by Michael Showalter

These days even caustic mainstream comedies are trying to rediscover sentimentality, without being sentimental. The Big Sick succeeds in generating genuine warmth even though it’s set in the middle of stand-up culture,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Wind River review – death on the reservation

A tracker investigates the murder of a Native American girl in a tense thriller full of well-meaning white people

“How do you gauge someone’s will to live?” asks Jeremy Renner’s Cory, a cowboy hunter living among the snow and silence of rural Wyoming’s permanent winter. Named after an Indian reservation of the same name, Wind River is the place where the corpse of a young Native American girl (Kelsey Asbille) is found, barefoot and frozen solid. With the help of FBI agent and Florida native Jane Banner (Elizabeth Olsen), Cory tries to figure out what – or who – she was running from. Written and directed by Taylor Sheridan (who wrote the screenplays for Sicario and Hell Or High Water), Wild River is a violent, tense thriller, sparse and well paced, from its chilling, moonlit opening to a nerve-shredding episode in a dilapidated house that recalls Clarice’s standoff
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Jeremy Renner Opens Up About Late Soundgarden Singer Chris Cornell: ‘He Is Amazing’

  • ET Canada
There’s no shortage of people whose lives Chris Cornell touched. Jeremy Renner was promoting his new film, “Wild River”, on Howard Stern’s SiriusXM radio show on Tuesday, when he also took a moment to open up about the late Soundgarden singer, who committed suicide at age 52 in May. “He is amazing,” the 46-year-old actor shared, explaining how […]
See full article at ET Canada »

Jeremy Renner Opens Up About Late Soundgarden Singer Chris Cornell: 'He Is Amazing'

Jeremy Renner Opens Up About Late Soundgarden Singer Chris Cornell: 'He Is Amazing'
There's no shortage of people whose lives Chris Cornell touched.

Jeremy Renner was promoting his new film, Wild River, on Howard Stern's SiriusXM radio show on Tuesday, when he also took a moment to open up about the late Soundgarden singer, who committed suicide at age 52 in May.

"He is amazing," the 46-year-old actor shared, explaining how he crossed paths with the rock legend through Josh Brolin and Andrew Michael Cooper. "Through friends of mine, I've known him for a bit."

"I was just glad to have any experience with Chris," Renner added.

Himself a musician, Renner admitted that he would have been too awestruck to ever have a jam session with Cornell.

"He was one of the reasons why I never wanted to be a singer because that voice that he had was...I almost
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Robin Hobb’s Realm Of The Elderlings series: Do I need to read them all?

Juliette Harrisson Jul 4, 2017

Thinking of tackling Robin Hobbs' Realm Of The Elderlings series? Juliette talks you through it...

Since this article is aimed at those who may not have read all of these books, spoilers will be kept to an absolute minimum – though a discussion of the overall development of a long-running series will inevitably involve some indication of where the early books are heading.

See related Willy Wonka: new movie will not adapt any of the books, origin beats confirmed

Robin Hobb’s Realm Of The Elderlings series is an epic fantasy saga currently comprising sixteen books. It tells a continuous, chronological story that starts in the first book, Assassin’s Apprentice, and reaches a conclusion (whether it is a final conclusion remains to be seen) in the most recent, Assassin’s Fate. However, unlike some other long-running fantasy sagas, this series is sub-divided into four trilogies and a quartet,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Jeremy Renner And Elizabeth Olsen In Action-Packed ‘Wind River’ Trailer

Elizabeth Olsen and Jeremy Renner were recently at the Cannes Film Festival to debut their upcoming film, “Wild River”, a tense thriller in which a rookie FBI agent (Olsen) teams up with a local tracker (Renner) to help solve a murder in a remote First Nations reservation. “U.S. Fish & Wildlife agent Cory Lambert discovers a […]
See full article at ET Canada »

18 Movies You'll Want to See After They Premiere at Sundance

Although the 2016 season in film isn't quite over until the Oscars take place, 2017's newest and most anticipated films are about to usher their way onto the (screen) scene. The Sundance Film Festival has arrived! This year's festival consists of 113 full-length films coming from as many as 31 countries and debuting 36 first-time filmmakers. Those included in the lineup come from a whopping 13,782 submissions, 95 of which will be world premieres. And to save you some trouble (read: countless hours scrolling Rotten Tomatoes), we've rounded up the most eagerly awaited movies you're most likely to hear about postpremiere. How about that for upping your indie culture game? 1. Before I Fall Director: Ry Russo-Young Cast: Zoey Deutch, Halston Sage, Diego Boneta This is a book-to-film adaptation based on the 2010 novel of same name by Lauren Oliver. High schooler Samantha Kingston (Deutch) thinks she has it all, living life amongst her Mean Girls-esque clique,
See full article at BuzzSugar »

The King and Four Queens

Clark Gable is still sufficiently frisky in this late career western to attract four well-chosen frontier women -- who in this case happen to be a quartet of robbers' wives, sitting on a rumored mountain of ill-gotten gains. Raoul Walsh abets the comedy-drama, as Gable's fox-in-a-henhouse tries to determine which hen can lead him to the promised golden eggs. The King and Four Queens Blu-ray Olive Films 1956 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 86 min. / Street Date May 24, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Clark Gable, Eleanor Parker, Jo Van Fleet, Jean Willes, Barbara Nichols, Sara Shane, Roy Roberts, Arthur Shields, Jay C. Flippen. Cinematography Lucien Ballard Production Design Wiard Ihnen Film Editor Howard Bretherton Original Music Alex North Written by Richard Alan Simmons, Margaret Fitts from her story Produced by David Hempstead Directed by Raoul Walsh

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Olive's latest dip into MGM's United Artists holdings brings up the cheerful, not particularly
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Scott Reviews Samuel Fuller’s Fixed Bayonets! [Masters of Cinema Blu-ray Review]

I’m noticing more and more a theme in postwar (especially American) cinema concerning pacifists turning towards violence. A character will introduce him- or herself as someone unable and morally opposed to weapons in general or harming another human being specifically, only to be put in a situation in which violence is presented as the only way out. We’ve covered (at least) two such films on this very website – Shane and Violent Saturday – and, having just seen it, I can add the considerably odd Frank Sinatra vehicle Suddenly to this list.

It’s not hard to see why American filmmakers and moviegoers would be interested in this subject at this time. Many of them had recently returned from war, where they did awful things for a greater good; those who didn’t go to war themselves certainly knew somebody who had. On a much larger scale, the use of
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Southerner

Looking to discover a top-quality film that honors lasting values? Jean Renoir gives Zachary Scott and Betty Field as Texas sharecroppers trying to survive a rough first year. It's beautifully written by Hugo Butler, with given realistic, earthy touches not found in Hollywood pix. And the transfer is a new UCLA restoration. With two impressive short subjects in equal good quality. The Southerner Blu-ray Kino Classics 1945 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 92 min. / Street Date February 9, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Betty Field, Beulah Bondi, Carol Naish, Norman Lloyd, Zachary Scott, Percy Kilbride, Charles Kemper, Blanche Yurka, Estelle Taylor, Paul Harvey, Noreen Nash, Nestor Paiva, Almira Sessions. Cinematography Lucien Andriot Film Editor Gregg C. Tallas Production Designer Eugène Lourié Assistant Director Robert Aldrich Original Music Werner Janssen Written by Hugo Butler, Jean Renoir from a novel by George Sessions Perry Produced by Robert Hakim, David L. Loew Directed by Jean Renoir
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Scott Reviews Samuel Fuller’s Pickup on South Street [Masters of Cinema Blu-ray Review]

In so many of the discussions (recorded and written) that accompany Masters of Cinema’s new Blu-ray edition of Pickup on South Street, the critic finds some way to make apologies for the fact that not all of the film was shot on the streets. In fact, very little was. Then as now, New York is an unpredictable animal, difficult to harness in a medium that so predicated on reliability that the entire industry surrounding it moved across the country just to ensure the sun would always be out. But studio-set production is not antithetical to Samuel Fuller’s “whole thing.” He’s not the gritty realist perhaps even he’d like to be, even viewing his films in the context of the times. Fuller is more like a political cartoonist without a punchline. He has cleverness to spare, but no jokes. More importantly, his style of expression is dependent
See full article at CriterionCast »
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