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Deadpan Comic Usurper Tim Conway Dies at 85

Tony Sokol May 14, 2019

Tim Conway's approach to comedy was so off-kilter his Carol Burnett Show acting partners couldn't keep straight faces.

It always appeared there were two jokes going on when Tim Conway took a turn on stage on The Carol Burnett Show. He was acting for the audience, but he was also trying to break up his co-performers. This gave the audience a view into an inside joke being tossed around by the troupe, and sometimes it looked like he was pulling a gag on his fellow performers. Tim Conway had a genius for making almost every line appear to be off-script and improvised. The quintessential in-the-moment comic performer died at 8:45 a.m. on May 14, in the Los Angeles area, according to Variety.

Conway was first noticed as Ernest Borgnine's sidekick on the 1960s sitcom McHale's Navy, an honor he continued when the pair reunited for SpongeBob SquarePants,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Tim Conway Dead At 85

  • CinemaRetro
Tim Conway, a legend of American comedy, has passed away at age 85. Conway soared to fame as the bungling Ensign Parker on the hit 1960s TV series "McHale's Navy". He later enjoyed great success as a regular player on Carol Burnett's variety show series. Conway also appeared in numerous feature films including Disney's "Apple Dumpling Gang" films. His final years were marred by serious health issues and family strife regarding who would represent his interests. For more, click here.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Tim Conway, ‘Carol Burnett Show’ and ‘SpongeBob SquarePants’ Star, Dies at 85

  • The Wrap
Tim Conway, ‘Carol Burnett Show’ and ‘SpongeBob SquarePants’ Star, Dies at 85
Tim Conway, the Emmy-winning comedian and actor who memorably starred in “McHale’s Navy” in the 1960s and “The Carol Burnett Show” in the ’70s, has died. He was 85.

Conway died around 8:45 a.m. Tuesday morning at a Los Angeles-area hospital after dealing with complications from Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus, according to family representative Howard Bragman.

The comedian, who also voiced Barnacle Boy on the animated hit “SpongeBob SquarePants,” won two of his six Emmys for guest appearances on the ’90s sitcom “Coach” and a second season episode of “30 Rock” in 2008.

Also Read: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2018 (Photos)

But he is best remembered for his outrageous work on “The Carol Burnett Show,” including characters such as the Oldest Man and Mr. Tudball, a badly toupéed businessman who becomes increasingly frustrated by Burnett’s dimwitted secretary Mrs. Wiggins.

Conway earned four Emmy Awards and a Golden Globe for his performance
See full article at The Wrap »

Tim Conway, 84, Suffering from Dementia: He's 'Almost Entirely Unresponsive,' Says Daughter

Tim Conway, 84, Suffering from Dementia: He's 'Almost Entirely Unresponsive,' Says Daughter
Tim Conway is battling dementia.

The 84-year-old Carol Burnett Show star’s daughter Kelly is asking to be appointed conservator of her father and be in charge of his medical treatments, according to court documents obtained by People and first reported by The Blast.

Kelly, 56, filed the documents in Los Angeles on Friday, claiming Conway’s wife Charlene is “planning to move him out of the excellent skilled nursing facility he is currently at” and place him in one that won’t give him access to “registered nurses at all times and his 24-hour caregiver and speech therapist (to help
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Former Child Actor Teddy Rooney, Son of Mickey Rooney, Dies at 66

Former Child Actor Teddy Rooney, Son of Mickey Rooney, Dies at 66
Former child actor Teddy Rooney has died. He was 66. Rooney's sister, Kelly, confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter that her brother died on Saturday in a convalescent home in Southern California after a long illness. Teddy was one of late actor Mickey Rooney's nine children. His mother was model and actress Martha Vickers, who was married to Mickey from 1949 - 1951 as his third of eight wives. Rooney acted alongside his mother on an episode of Playhouse 90 in 1957. In addition, he was featured in his father's film Andy Hardy Comes Home in 1958 and General Electric Theater in 1960. Among Rooney's most
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

George Kennedy, 'Dallas' and 'Cool Hand Luke' Star, Passes Away at 91

George Kennedy, 'Dallas' and 'Cool Hand Luke' Star, Passes Away at 91
Star of both the big and small screen, George Kennedy has died. The actor passed away at the age of 91. It was reported by the Oscar-winning actor's grandson that Kennedy had been in failing health since the death of his wife over a year ago. He is best known for his role on the hit TV series Dallas and turns in such iconic movies as Cool Hand Luke and Airport.

The actor won a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his role as prison warden Dragline in Cool Hand Luke. He died this past Sunday in Boise, Idaho. Grandson Cory Schenkel told TMZ that the actor had been in hospice care this entire past month. Though, an exact cause of death was not immediately stated.

George Kennedy has a long and storied history in Hollywood, with over 183 acting credits to his name. He made his debut appearance on The Phil Silvers Show
See full article at MovieWeb »

R.I.P. Yvonne Craig aka Batgirl

  • JoBlo
Actress Yvonne Craig, best known for her role as Batgirl in the 60s Batman TV series, died this past Monday at age 78 from cancer. She originally trained to be a ballet dancer before finding success in TV shows like The Man From U.N.C.L.E, McHale's Navy, and of course, Batman. That, coupled with her later role on Star Trek as the infamous green slave girl who wanted to kill Captain Kirk, permanently etched her in... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »

Bob Hastings Dead: McHale's Navy Actor Dies at 89

Bob Hastings Dead: McHale's Navy Actor Dies at 89
Bob Hastings, known to McHale's Navy fans as Lt. Elroy Carpenter, died Monday, June 30, of prostate cancer. He was 89. His granddaughter Allison Knowles confirmed his death to the Associated Press on July 2, noting that he was at home in Burbank, Calif., at the time of his passing. Hastings' role in the 1960s sitcom McHale's Navy was his most famous, but he also appeared on Dennis The Menace, The Munsters, Green Acres, and All in the Family (as bar owner Kelsey). In the 1980s, he had [...]
See full article at Us Weekly »

McHale's Navy, Batman: Actor Bob Hastings Dies at 89

Beloved character actor Bob Hastings passed away yesterday at the age of 89. He died at his Burbank home from pancreatic cancer, his third fight with cancer in 15 years.

Robert "Bob" Francis Hastings, Sr. began his career in radio at the age of 11. Followng a stint in the Air Force, he became the voice of Archie Andrews on radio. He moved into television where he appeared on numerous shows and voiced many, many cartoon characters.

He was perhaps best known for playing Lieutenant Elroy Carpenter on McHale's Navy, bartender Tommy Kelsey in All in the Family, Superboy in the 1960s Superboy cartoons, and Comissioner Gordon in various Batman series and projects starting in the 1990s.

What do you think? Did you enjoy Bob Hastings' work? Have any favorite memories?
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Rip: Batman The Animated Series Voice Actor Bob Hastings

Bob Hastings, who voiced Commissioner Gordon on Batman: The Animated Series, as well as Clark Kent and Superboy in The Superman/Batman Hour and Superboy in the 1960's, has passed away. According to The Burbank Leader, Hastings died of pancreatic cancer, which he had been battling for the last 15 years.  People like Kevin Conroy and Mark Hamill get a lot of credit for voicing Batman and the Joker, respectively, but Hastings put his own iconic stamp on the character of Commissioner Gordon, which undoubtedly influenced the live action versions we've seen in various Batman films.  Hastings lent his voice to a variety of voicework for decades. His credits include Batman: The Mystery of the Batwoman, Batman: The Rise of Sin Tzu videogame, Static Shock, Gotham Girls, Jak and Daxter, The New Batman Adventures, Superman, Batman: The Animated Series, Batman: Mask of the Phantasm, Challenge of the SuperFriends, The Munsters,
See full article at ComicBookMovie »

Gavin MacLeod 'This Is Your Captain Speaking': 'The Love Boat,' suicide and alcoholism

  • Pop2it
"This Is Your Captain Speaking: My Fantastic Voyage Through Hollywood, Faith & Life" is the new memoir from Gavin MacLeod, in which "The Love Boat" icon name drops major Hollywood stars and opens up about his alcoholism and suicidal tendencies.

"The big stars are the best," MacLeod writes of working on "The Love Boat." "I pinched myself every single day."

He also provides personal anecdotes about Robert Redford, Cary Grant and Bette Davis, among other Hollywood heavyweights.

A slump later in MacLeod's career, around the time he appeared on TV's "McHale's Navy" lead the actor into heavy drinking, which he eventually gave up in the early 1970s. "I never craved another drink," he writes of his newfound sobriety. "I see people get drunk in front of me and I feel compassion for them. I celebrate life sober." 

Macleod also celebrates life as a "grateful" born again Christian, and says he will
See full article at Pop2it »

Ernest Borgnine obituary

Stocky supporting actor who won an Oscar when he was cast against type as a lonely butcher in Marty

With his coarsely podgy features, bug eyes, gap-toothed grin and stocky build, Ernest Borgnine, who has died aged 95 of renal failure, seemed destined to remain one of nature's supporting actors in a string of sadistic and menacing parts. Instead he won an Oscar for a role which was the antithesis of all his previous characters.

In 1955, the producer Harold Hecht wanted to transfer Paddy Chayefsky's teleplay Marty to the big screen, with Rod Steiger in the title role, which he had created. But Steiger was filming Oklahoma! so was unavailable. Borgnine was offered the role after a female guest at a Hollywood reception quite disinterestedly remarked to Hecht that, ugly as he was, Borgnine possessed an oddly tender quality which made her yearn to mother him. "That," Hecht said later,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Ernest Borgnine dies aged 95

Actor who won an Oscar for his role as Marty in the 1955 film of the same name had a 60-year career in film and television

Ernest Borgnine, the Italian-American actor who carved out a distinctive screen presence in a range of pugnacious character roles over a 60-year career, has died at the age of 95.

Borgnine won an Oscar for his role as Marty in the 1955 film of the same name, and was a star of the small screen during the 1960s as the scheming Navy officer in the comedy McHale's Navy. In the 80s, he came to the attention of a new generation of TV viewers as Dominic Santini in the hit series Airwolf.

In other roles, particularly during the earlier years of his career, his stocky build and bulldog appearance made him a natural choice to play the classic Hollywood 'heavy' and he was memorable as the sergeant who
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Ernest Borgnine – a career in clips

Ernest Borgnine has died at the age of 95. We look back over his career in clips

Borgnine's first screen credit was, somewhat improbably, as a Chinese gambling-den operator called Hu Chang in a studio thriller called China Corsair. After more bit parts as racketeers, heavies and gun-toting villains, Borgnine put himself on the map with the memorably-named nasty Fatso Judson in From Here to Eternity. The aggressive, loutish Judson, quick with a switchblade, is the guard sergeant in the stockade, where he eventually does for the mercurial Angelo Maggio (played by Frank Sinatra).

Borgnine progressed to a string of more visible henchman roles – in Johnny Guitar, Vera Cruz, The Bounty Hunter – but probably his best from this period is another fight-picking bruiser from Bad Day at Black Rock – "I'm half horse, half alligator. You mess with me and I'll kick a lung outta' ya'."

Bad Day at Black Rock was
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Ernest Borgnine: 1917-2012

Ernest Borgnine: 1917-2012
Ernest Borgnine, the rugged, stocky actor with a brassy voice and the face of the local butcher, died today in Los Angeles at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center of renal failure. He was 95.

Borgnine was known for playing characters both brutal and gentle. On the brutal side was the cruel Sgt. "Fatso" Judson in From Here to Eternity, Coley Trimble, the right-hand goon in Bad Day at Black Rock, Dutch Engstrom, in the enduring classic The Wild Bunch and Shack, the train bull after Lee Marvin in Emperor of the North. On the gentle side he was known as the love-lorn Marty in the 1955 film of the same name (for which he earned an Oscar for Best Actor), Lt. Commander Quinton McHale from "McHale's Navy," Rogo, the cop with the prostitute-wife in The Poseidon Adventure and, to a whole new generation, as the voice of the starfish-donning, geriatric Mermaid Man on "SpongeBob SquarePants."

A first generation American Ernest Borgnine was born Ermes Effron Borgnino on January 24, 1917, in Hamden, Connecticut. His father was Camillo (later Charles) Borgnino of Ottiglio, in northern Italy and his mother was Anna Bosselli, from Capri, Italy.

Borgnine showed no real interest in acting until well after a ten-year stint in the Navy. He was 32 when his mother suggested that he become an actor, observing "you like to make a fool of yourself in front of other people" so Ernie enrolled in the Randall School of Drama in Hartford and then moved to Abingdon, Virginia for Robert Porterfield's famous Barter Theatre.

Times were lean for Borgnine. He had married for the first time and moved from the Barter to New York, quickly getting noticed for his role as a male nurse in a Broadway production of "Harvey" but he soon moved back to the Barter school again. He then returned to New York but the nascent medium of television, not the stage, sustained him for a while. Borgnine prided himself on not being picky. His original TV work included a stint in the action serial "Captain Video and His Video Rangers." He was noticed by Delbert Mann, himself a budding director, who encouraged Borgnine and gave him small roles.

Borgnine's true break came when he moved to Los Angeles and landed the role of Sergeant "Fatso" Judson in Eternity, a smash hit that, in addition to launching Borgnine's helped reinvigorate numerous careers including Frank Sinatra's and Deborah Kerr's. He played the bad guy again, though one of the goons this time, in Johnny Guitar. Borgnine then parlayed his new-found notoriety with the lead in a screenplay written by Paddy Chayefsky, that of Marty, in the film of the same name, slated to be directed by his mentor, Delbert Mann. The story was about an underdog named Marty, a self-avowed ugly man, who has to evolve beyond his dedication to his overbearing mother and his bonds with his best friend, when he falls in love with Clara, a woman who is also unpopular and unattractive, played by Betsy Blair.

Marty was a surprise hit, was nominated for eight Oscars (including Best Picture and Best Director for Mann) and won four, including Borgnine's unexpected win over a very crowded field which included his co-star in Bad Day at Black Rock,Spencer Tracy, and a posthumous nod to James Dean (who had died the previous September in a car crash) for his role in East of Eden.

The Oscar helped keep the actor in the game and the next seven years included a mix of TV and film work including A Catered Affair, Jubal, The Vikings and various "Playhouse" appearances on the small screen.

1962 brought "McHale's Navy," with Borgnine assaying the role of Lt. Commander Quinton McHale, the put-upon chief of PT boat 73. The cast included Joe Flynn and Tim Conway (Conway would, 35 years later, team up again with Borgnine as the voice of Mermaid Man's sidekick, Barnacle Boy, on "SpongeBob SquarePants"). "McHale's" had a healthy following for four years.

Borgnine had a mid-life Renaissance in the late '60s and early '70s. He played a small but pivotal role in The Dirty Dozen, was Boris Vaslov in Ice Station Zebra and was Dutch Engstrom, the taciturn but decisive bandit throwing in with Sam Peckinpah's Wild Bunch. He also joined the capsized cast of The Poseidon Adventure, played Shack, the train bull in The Emperor of the North Pole and was the simple-minded but helpful Cabbie in Escape from New York.

Borgnine was married five times. His second marriage was to the fiery actress Katy Jurado. It began in 1959 but was over four years later. Reports differ on when he met his third wife, Ethel Merman. She claimed it was in November of 1963, the same month that he was finalizing his divorce to Jurado. He insisted it wasn't until the next spring. Regardless they were married on June 24th, the following year. It lasted less than a month. In her autobiography entitled "Merman," the actress intimated that Borgnine was abusive stating, "I just feel lucky to have been able to 'walk' away from the marriage." She devoted an entire chapter to their union, entitled "My Marriage to Ernest Borgnine"--it consisted of one blank page.

His last marriage, to Tova Traesnaes, lasted over 35 years and until his death. Borgnine had four children: Gina Kemins-Borgnine, the child from his first marriage to Rhoda Kemins, and three from his fourth wife, Donna Rancourt, named Diana Rancourt-Borgnine (born December 29th 1970), Sharon (born 1965) and Cristofer (born 1969). Oddly, in his autobiography, "Ernie" Bornine only acknowledged the first three children, dropping Diana out entirely.

TV Espresso: House, Smurfs, Lone Ranger, Kojak, and The Addams Family

A veteran character actor passes, Hugh Laurie's still unsure about the future of House, The Addams Family musical has been revamped, The Smurfs is ineligible for an Oscar, The Lone Ranger movie gets a True Blood bad guy, and notable dates in TV history.

Dan Frazer

The actor best known for playing Police Captain Frank McNeil in the Kojak TV series has died at the age of 90. He passed away in New York on December 16th from cardiac arrest. Frazer appeared on numerous TV shows since the 1950s, including McHale's Navy, The Untouchables, The Phil Silvers Show, My Favorite Martian, Barney Miller, and The Waltons. He appeared in three versions of Law & Order and recurred on As the World Turns as Lt. McCloskey from 1986-96. He played McNeil on Kojak for all five seasons and reprised the role for the 1983 reunion movie, Kojak: The
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

The Dick Van Dyke Show, That Girl: Writer Sam Denoff Dies

Sam Denoff, the Emmy-winning writer who wrote for shows like The Dick Van Dyke Show, has died at the age of 83 in Los Angeles. He passed away on Friday from Alzheimer's disease at the age of 83.

With his writing partner Bill Persky, Denoff wrote for Steve Allen, Andy Williams, and McHale's Navy before being hired for The Dick Van Dyke Show. They worked on more than 70 episodes, including such classics as the one in which Rob thinks they brought home the wrong baby, when Laura accidentally tells the world that Alan Brady is bald, the Western dream episode, and the series finale.

Series creator Carl Reiner told the La Times, "When they came upon the scene, they saved my life... These two guys made my life possible after that."

Denoff and Persky went on to create several other
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Arthur Marx obituary

Novelist, screenwriter and biographer whose subjects included his father, Groucho

Arthur Marx, who has died aged 89, grew up in the shadow of his father, Groucho, and was steeped in the controlled chaos of the Marx Brothers. Torn between trying to distance himself from a demanding father, yet also prove worthy of his genius, he enjoyed a long career as a writer of screen and stage comedies, novels and biographies. Not surprisingly, however, his most successful work capitalised on the public's interest in his father and his uncles, Chico, Harpo, Gummo and Zeppo.

Marx wrote several works about Groucho, the first of which, Life With Groucho (1954), published at the height of his father's television popularity, was a warts-and-all portrait punctuated by Groucho's own annotations. (Marx wrote that he would like to correct the impression that his father was a miser; Groucho's footnote read: "You'd better or I'll cut you off without a nickle.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Arthur Marx obituary

Novelist, screenwriter and biographer whose subjects included his father, Groucho

Arthur Marx, who has died aged 89, grew up in the shadow of his father, Groucho, and was steeped in the controlled chaos of the Marx Brothers. Torn between trying to distance himself from a demanding father, yet also prove worthy of his genius, he enjoyed a long career as a writer of screen and stage comedies, novels and biographies. Not surprisingly, however, his most successful work capitalised on the public's interest in his father and his uncles, Chico, Harpo, Gummo and Zeppo.

Marx wrote several works about Groucho, the first of which, Life With Groucho (1954), published at the height of his father's television popularity, was a warts-and-all portrait punctuated by Groucho's own annotations. (Marx wrote that he would like to correct the impression that his father was a miser; Groucho's footnote read: "You'd better or I'll cut you off without a nickle.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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