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‘In Contempt’ Canceled By Bet After One Season

  • Deadline
There will be no second season for In Contempt, Bet’s legal drama starring Erica Ash, Deadline has confirmed.

“At this time, Bet Networks will not be moving forward with a second season of In Contempt. We are grateful to the incredible cast and producers. We would especially like to thank and recognize the acclaimed Executive Producers Terri Kopp, who created the series, Lance Samuels and Daniel Iron. We look forward to finding ways to continue in partnership,” a Bet Networks spokesperson said in a statement to Deadline. “We are also excited to continue our relationship with the star of In Contempt, Erica Ash as she is set to star along Paula Patton in the film Sacrifice premiering this fall on Bet+.”

In Contempt was set in a legal aid office in New York City, in which opinionated and wildly outspoken attorney Gwen (Ash) contended with complicated cases and office
See full article at Deadline »

Jean-Luc Godard Shares Details of New Film, a Yellow-Vest Drama

Jean-Luc Godard Shares Details of New Film, a Yellow-Vest Drama
Jean-Luc Godard has revealed details of his follow-up to “The Image Book,” which saw the French New Wave luminary take his experimental approach in bold new directions. Though his next project doesn’t yet have a title, it does have a narrative: “It will tell the story of a Yellow Vest woman who breaks up with her boyfriend,” Godard told Les Inrockuptibles. “The theme is inspired by Racine’s Bérénice. The character brings to mind Bérénice when Titus comes back to the State.”

“It won’t be made just of what you call archival images. There will also be a shoot. I don’t know whether I’ll find what one calls actors. I’d like to film the people one sees on news channels but plunging them into a situation where documentary and fiction blend,” Godard added.

He continued, “I don’t know whether they’ll agree to be filmed in relation to themselves,
See full article at Indiewire »

Scorsese and De Niro Discuss Music, Leo, and a Letter from Malick

Scorsese and De Niro Discuss Music, Leo, and a Letter from Malick
The celebrated director-actor duo Martin Scorsese and Robert De Niro have been familiar faces on stage at the Tribeca Film Festival De Niro co-founded 18 years ago. Yet it is rare to have the two on the same stage talking about their work like they did yesterday for 90 minutes in front of a packed Beacon Theater crowd.

Officially, it was De Niro interviewing Scorsese, but with Marty curating most of the half dozen clips that were screened it was very much the director framing the conversation and it was clear he had music on his mind. Early in the conversation, Scorsese screened back-to-back clips of Emmylou Harris and The Band performing “Evangeline” from his 1978 concert film “The Last Waltz” and a boxing scene from “Raging Bull” to highlight the role music plays in shaping his work.

Scorsese started by breaking down how the entire concert performance was done in six carefully planned shots.
See full article at Indiewire »

Journeys into Dissonance: Close-Up on Jean-Luc Godard's "The Image Book"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Jean-Luc Godard's The Image Book (2018) is having its exclusive online premiere in the United Kingdom from December 3 – January 1, 2019.Attempting to write about Jean-Luc Godard’s The Image Book is a frankly Sisyphean and onerous task. We can start with the fact that the film was screened in Cannes and in the closing ceremony was awarded a Special Palme d’Or, the first in the festival’s history. The award felt like a merci et au revoir to one of the most distinctive, pioneering thrillingly intellectual and irascible directors in cinema; a man who re-mapped and re-routed the destination of the medium many times. But was seldom thanked for it, at least not after the halcyon New Wave period that incorporated Breathless (1960) and Contempt (1963). Godard, it transpires, has no plans to stop working. Good for him; the perennial fly in the ointment.
See full article at MUBI »

Netflix and Movie Theaters Are on the Same Side, Whether or Not They’ll Admit It — Cannes Critic’s Notebook

Walking the red carpet at Cannes feels less like you’re going to the movies and more like you’re going to the Oscars. It’s like being in the eye of the world’s most glamorous hurricane, a maelstrom of pomp and celebrity raging around you as you try not to trip over your own feet. Once inside the theater, you’re ushered to your seat by someone dressed like a Pan Am stewardess. A hush sweeps over the crowd when the director of that evening’s film arrives, as everyone rises to their feet for a thunderous ovation as he or she (but probably he) walks down the aisle; it’s like the royal wedding, but not as diverse.

Waiting for the lights to go down on the depressing Polish love story at the center of all this fuss, I found myself reflecting on the very public spat
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes News: Everbody Knows, The Poster Unveils, and Netflix Whines

It's still wintry here in NYC (groan) but Spring technically arrived a little while ago which means that the Cannes film festival is right around the corner. Here are three pieces of news involving the festival which will run from May 8th to May 19th.

The Poster

This year's poster, pictured above, is a quad rather than a horizontal for some reason. Usually they come in both formats or are just horizontal. It's based on the work of stills photographer Georges Pierre and the Jean Luc Godard film Pierrot Le Fou (1965). That's two posters based on Godard films in fairly quick succession. Last year's poster featured 1960s Italian sex symbol Claudia Cardinale but the year before that the poster was in tribute to Jean-Luc Godard's Contempt (1963)! 'Maybe Cannes ought to look beyond the 1960s and Godard sometime soon?,' he suggested with ribbing affection. 

Opening Night film and the Netflix controversy after the jump.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Cannes Film Fest Poster 2018: Stolen Kisses In Jean-Luc Godard’s ‘Pierrot Le Fou’

  • Deadline
For the second time in recent memory, a Jean-Luc Godard film has inspired the annual Cannes Film Festival poster — this year with an image from his 1965 crime/romance pic Pierrot Le Fou. It’s a fitting tribute to have another Godard movie memorialized given this year’s event marks half a century since the legendary filmmaker played a part in halting the 1968 proceedings amid a wave of civil unrest throughout France. The last Godard movie to inspire the poster was Contempt (Le Mépris) in 2016.

The fest has been teasing out info ahead of tomorrow’s lineup reveal and today unveiled the official affiche — a collectible that’s annually anticipated and dissected.

Pierrot Le Fou, based on the 1962 novel Obsession, starred Jean-Paul Belmondo and Anna Karina. He’s a TV executive bored by his bourgeois Parisian life who drops everything and runs off with an old girlfriend (Karina) who’s being chased by hitmen.
See full article at Deadline »

Barry Jenkins Names His 10 Favorite Film Scores: ‘Sicario,’ ‘Gone Girl,’ and More

Barry Jenkins Names His 10 Favorite Film Scores: ‘Sicario,’ ‘Gone Girl,’ and More
Love the film scores for “Jackie” and “Gone Girl”? You’re not alone. Barry Jenkins celebrated National Film Score Day by publishing his personal list of 10 favorite film scores, and the selections cover recent favorites like “Sicario” and classics such as Georges Delerue’s music for Jean-Luc Godard’s “Contempt.”

Jenkins includes current favorites like Mica Levi, Alexandre Desplat, and Cliff Martinez on his list. The “Sicario” mention is another reminder of what great work Jóhann Jóhannsson achieved before his untimely death earlier this year. Despite the addition of “The 400 Blows,” Jenkins wrote a follow-up tweet saying he would replace the entry with Ryuchi Sakamoto’s “Gohatto” score instead.

Jenkins is expected to return to theaters this year with his James Baldwin adaptation “If Beale Street Could Talk.” The feature is the director’s first since the breakout success of “Moonlight,” which won the Oscar for Best Picture. Jenkins
See full article at Indiewire »

A Spectre Is Haunting...: The Dziga Vertov Group

  • MUBI
The retrospective Godard and the Dziga Vertov Group is showing from February 27 - March 26, 2018 on Mubi in the United Kingdom and United States.British SoundsThe execrable new film Redoubtable by Michel Hazanavicius reduces all aspects of Jean-Luc Godard and his career to the level of a cartoon. And not even a great, cinematically advanced cartoon—the Fleischer brothers, Chuck Jones, or Tex Avery, something that might actually capture some semblance of Jlg’s anarchic humor. No, Redoubtable is strictly Hanna-Barbara, two-dimensional animals lumbering about on an unchanging, depthless landscape. (Oh look! Silly Jean-Luc has broken his glasses again!) As if to drive home the childishness of the film, it is being retitled in the U.S. Now called Godard Mon Amour, it not only makes a mockery of an actually great film by Alain Resnais and Marguerite Duras. It emphasizes Godard as little more than a brand name, a selling point.
See full article at MUBI »

Video Essay. Coming Apart: Jean-Luc Godard’s "Contempt"

  • MUBI
The 27th entry in an on-going series of audiovisual essays by Cristina Álvarez López and Adrian Martin. Mubi is showing Jean-Luc Godard's Contempt (1963) December 24, 2017 - January 23, 2018 in the United States as part of the retrospective For Ever Godard.The challenge of composing any decent history of film style is to account for, and accurately annotate, its transformations. And this is an especially acute challenge when we find ourselves in a transit-lounge that overlaps different periods—such as the 1960s, when classical mise en scène became something which could be rejected wholesale, but also referenced, cited, evoked—and thereby bracketed, problematized, and merrily interfered with. There are many sly ways in which the modernist cinema of the 1960s played with strategies of narrative and mise en scène. In Jean-Luc Godard’s Contempt (1963) there is an early scene, set in the villa garden of the movie producer Prokosch (Jack Palance), which
See full article at MUBI »

The World as One: Close-Up on Jean-Luc Godard’s “Contempt”

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Jean-Luc Godard's Contempt (1963) is showing December 24, 2017 - January 23, 2018 in the United States as part of the retrospective For Ever Godard.One thing most commonly and justly admired in Contempt (1963) by the many who revere the film is its singular place on the dividing line in cinema between classicism and modernism. The 1960s, and most intensely in mid-decade, was a transitional time for these phases, one that of course should never be simplified because of the many instances in which classical directors looked ahead with modernist impulses or modern directors (like the New Wave coterie of which Jean-Luc Godard was a part) looked back with longing to what had gone before. Among so many movies that affirm this point, it’s enough to cite Voyage to Italy (Roberto Rossellini, 1954), a touchstone for modern cinema, which it anticipated (though without
See full article at MUBI »

Life Is Elsewhere: Close-Up on "That Most Important Thing: Love"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Andrzej Żuławski's The Most Important Thing: Love (1975) is showing November 22 - December 22, 2017 in the United States.The DevilKiedy wszedłeś między wrony, musisz krakać jak i one.

(‘When among the crows, caw as they do.’)—Polish sayingAndrzej Żuławski’s That Most Important Thing: Love (1975) is unlike any film he ever made, and was certainly a departure in his visual sensibility relative to the feature films he had made previously in his native Poland: The Third Part of the Night (1971) and The Devil (1972). Narratively and visually, the film is at once an oddity and a turning point in Żuławski’s oeuvre, and in viewing it, it would benefit the viewer to understand the director’s experience with the French cinematic tradition and its effect on his own cinema.Żuławski was born into a well-known family of artists that spanned several generations in Poland,
See full article at MUBI »

The Reality of a Reflection: An Exploration of Jean-Luc Godard's Filmography

  • MUBI
Mubi's retrospective For Ever Godard is showing from November 12, 2017 - January 16, 2018 in the United States.Jean-Luc Godard is a difficult filmmaker to pin down because while his thematic concerns as an artist have remained more or less consistent over the last seven decades, his form is ever-shifting. His filmography is impossible to view in a vacuum, as his work strives to reflect on the constantly evolving cinema culture that surrounds it: Godard always works with the newest filmmaking technologies available, and his films have become increasingly abstracted and opaque as the wider culture of moving images has become increasingly fragmented. Rather than working to maintain an illusion of diegetic truth, Godard’s work as always foreground its status as a manufactured product—of technology, of an industry, of on-set conditions and of an individual’s imagination. Mubi’S Godard retrospective exemplifies the depth and range of Godard’s career as
See full article at MUBI »

NYC Weekend Watch: Michael Haneke, German Cinema, Rialto Pictures, and More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Forum

A Michael Haneke retrospective begins as does a restoration of The Crime of Monsieur Lange.

The Film Society Lincoln Center

“The Lost Years of German Cinema” features rare cinematic gems from Fritz Lang, Helmut Käutner, Robert Siodmak, and more.

Anthology Film Archives

“Generation Wealth” kicks off with The Bling Ring, Spring Breakers, L’Argent,
See full article at The Film Stage »

How New Movies Are Redefining Our Understanding of Family Life

  • Indiewire
How New Movies Are Redefining Our Understanding of Family Life
The following essay was produced as part of the 2017 Locarno Critics Academy, a workshop for aspiring film critics that took place during the 70th edition of the Locarno Film Festival.

Locarno isn’t just home to a major European film festival. It’s also an ideal place for many Swiss and foreign families to travel in summer and enjoy its hot weather, pleasant cuisine, and serene lake. This makes it a terrific place for contemplating new movies.

Ironically, during the 70th edition of the Locarno Film Festival, many of the films outwardly questioned the value of traditional family life. Many viewers encountered the puzzling contrast of watching subversive movies, leaving the screening rooms, and watching very conventional heterosexual families enjoying their vacations. But this only made the power of these movies stand out.

“C’est moi” says Fanny Ardant, a transgender women, in “Lola Pater,” the film by the Franco-Algerian director Nadir Mokneche,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Quiet American (1958)

There appear to be no rules governing tricky politics in movies — Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s adaptation of Graham Greene’s novel about terrorism in French-held Vietnam completely reverses the author’s message. Does a conspiracy theory about a movie still carry any weight, when our daily political life now plays like one giant conspiracy?

The Quiet American

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1958 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 122 min. / Street Date June 13, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Audie Murphy, Michael Redgrave, Claude Dauphin, Giorgia Moll,

Bruce Cabot, Fred Sadoff, Kerima, Richard Loo.

Cinematography: Robert Krasker

Film Editor: William Hornbeck

Original Music: Mario Nascimbene

Written by Joseph L. Mankiewicz from a novel by Graham Greene

Produced and Directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz

Fans of author Graham Greene know him for his political sophistication and his adherence to Catholic themes; he’s found holy values in a razor-wielding Spiv in Brighton Rock and
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The World’s Most Beautiful Swindlers

A breezy five-episode compilation movie about swindles plays out in five film capitals, under the eye of five different directors including Claude Chabrol and Jean-Luc Godard. But Roman Polanski’s Amsterdam segment couldn’t be included, which is a shame. It’s in B&W ‘scope, and everybody gets to bring their favorite cameraman and composer along.

The World’s Most Beautiful Swindlers

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1964 / B&W / 2:35 widescreen / 95 108, 124 min. / Street Date April 25, 2017 / Les plus belles escroqueries du monde / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring: Mie Hama, Ken Mitsuda, Nicole Karen, Gabriella Giorgelli, Jan Teulings, Arnold Gelderman, Guido Giuseppone, Giuseppe Mannajuolo, Jean-Pierre Cassel, Catherine Deneuve, Francis Blanche, Sacha Briquet, Jean-Louis Maury, Philomène Toulouse, Charles Denner, Jean-Luc Godard, Jean Seberg, László Szabó.

Cinematography: Raoul Coutard, Tonino Delli Colli, Jerzy Lipman, Asakazu Nakai, Jean Rabier

Film Editor:

Original Music: Serge Gainsbourg, Pierre Jansen, Krzysztof Komeda, Michel Legrand, Keitaro Miho, Piero Umiliani
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Best Opening Credit Sequences In Movie History — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best Opening Credit Sequences In Movie History — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: Inspired by Baby Groot’s “Mr. Blue Sky” dance sequence at the beginning of “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,” what movie has the best opening credits sequence?

April Wolfe (@awolfeful), La Weekly

Hands down, it’s R.W. Fassbinder’s “The Marriage of Maria Braun.” I watch the opening sequence at least three times a year and show it to every filmmaker I can. I love any film that begins with a bang, and this one does quite literally: We open up on an explosion that rips out a hunk of brick wall, exposing a German couple in the middle of a rushed marriage ceremony.
See full article at Indiewire »

Frémaux spills the beans on Cannes Official Selection process

Cannes will be tying up the line-up until late into the night, according to Frémaux’s recent book.

With less than 24 hours to go until the Cannes Film Festival unveils the Official Selection of its 70th edition (May 17-28) speculation is building.

The eve of the announcement is a decisive day for the festival as it ties-up the loose ends of it line-up.

Cannes delegate general Thierry Frémaux and the rest of his selection and press team will be lockdown at the festival’s rue Amélie offices in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower.

Frémaux describes today as the “day of all dangers”, in his recent book, Sélection Officielle (pictured, right), a blow-by-blow account of how the 2016 selection came together over the course of a year.

“There are still films to be seen and decisions to be taken, some will be delicate: establishing a selection is not an exact science,” writes Frémaux
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Thierry Frémaux spills the beans on Cannes Official Selection

Cannes will be tying up the line-up until late into the night, according to Frémaux’s recent book.

With less than 24 hours to go until the Cannes Film Festival unveils the Official Selection of its 70th edition (May 17-28) speculation is building.

The eve of the announcement is a decisive day for the festival as it ties-up the loose ends of it line-up.

Cannes delegate general Thierry Frémaux and the rest of his selection and press team will be lockdown at the festival’s rue Amélie offices in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower.

Frémaux describes today as the “day of all dangers”, in his recent book, Sélection Officielle (pictured, right), a blow-by-blow account of how the 2016 selection came together over the course of a year.

“There are still films to be seen and decisions to be taken, some will be delicate: establishing a selection is not an exact science,” writes Frémaux
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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