PT 109 (1963) - News Poster

(1963)

News

Acting President: Actors Who Have Portrayed More than One U.S. President On Film

  • Cinelinx
Which actors are the most "Presidential"? To find out, we assembled this exclusive list of actors who have portrayed the President of the United States more than once.

Getting the opportunity to portray a Us President in film is rare. It can be a dignified role, and many times the actor has to be able to exhibit certain qualities we would traditionally associate with the Us head of state. Us Presidents are also depicted in film in a variety of ways. Some of them are the main characters for their respective films, where others are simply bit parts designed to represent the figurehead. Other roles may be satires, caricatures, or played for comedic effect. Regardless of the purpose or the depth of the role, there have been a limited number of Us President roles in the last century+ of motion picture projection.

Of course, some actors are more Presidential than others.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Ansel Elgort to play a young John F. Kennedy in Mayday 109

  • JoBlo
According to Deadline, Baby Driver star Ansel Elgort has signed on to play John F. Kennedy in Mayday 109, a drama based on Kennedy’s service during the second World War. The upcoming feature will focus on Kennedy's time as the commander of Patrol Torpedo boat 109 in the South Pacific when, on the evening of August 2, 1943, Pt 109 was rammed by the Japanese destroyer Amagin and two crewmen... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »

15 Actors Who Played JFK, From Patrick Dempsey to Rob Lowe (Photos)

15 Actors Who Played JFK, From Patrick Dempsey to Rob Lowe (Photos)
Cliff Robertson, “Pt 109” (1963) Oscar winner Cliff Robertson (“Charly” and “Spider-Man” 1 and 2) portrayed JFK during his military years as a U.S. Navy officer in command of Motor Torpedo Boat Pt-109 touring the waters of the Pacific amidst World War II. William Devane, “The Missiles of October” (1974) Devane (“Knots Landing,” “24”) portrayed JFK in this made-for-tv offering, which depicted the drama in the 1962 White House while the President’s administration decided the best course of action during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Martin Sheen, “Kennedy” (1983) Jed Bartlet on “The West Wing” wasn’t the only Democratic president Sheen has portrayed on screen.
See full article at The Wrap »

Veteran’s Day Tribute: The Ten Best Navy Movies

Veteran’s Day is November 11. While we all try to escape from the most exasperating Presidential Campaign in our history let me pay tribute to the Men and Women who have served in the military to insure we keep our electoral process and our freedoms.

Having served in the Navy four years (there he goes again!) I have a keen interest in any movie about the military, especially the sea service. I did serve during peace time so had no experience with combat but still spent most of my tour of duty at sea on an aircraft carrier, the USS Amerca CV66. Among other jobs I ran the ship’s television station for almost two years. Movies have always been important to me and so providing a few hours of entertainment every day when we were at sea was just about the best job I could have had.

The author
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

When Barack met Michelle: the presidential biopic as love story

Southside With You is the latest in a long line of presidential biopics. But since it is simply an account of the Obamas’ first date, with little reference to their illustrious future, how will it rate alongside the likes of Young Mr Lincoln and Pt 109?

If Hollywood is to be believed, the most fascinating parts of a life are the rise and the fall — the ascent up the mountain and the inevitable tumble back to sea level. The middle bit — all the stuff about how one copes with the mundane reality of one’s fate — is less travelled territory. Look no further than the superhero origin story. Despite how often moviegoers have seen Batman’s parents gunned down in an alley, no shortage of films and TV shows choose to dramatise it yet again. But long before capes and masks were dominating cinemas, the film industry was giving audiences
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Why ‘American Sniper’ Is a Coming Out Party for Patriotism (Guest Blog)

  • The Wrap
Why ‘American Sniper’ Is a Coming Out Party for Patriotism (Guest Blog)
Moviegoers can finally enjoy a film with a genuine hero who served his country and fought in a righteous war

The New England Patriots spent this past weekend earning a spot in the Super Bowl. But many more patriots went to the movies and propelled “American Sniper” to a record-setting January box office weekend.

In doing so, they officially declared war against the likes of Michael Moore, Seth Rogen and so many liberal, peace loving, pot-smoking A-listers and Hollywood suits who, since the 1970s, have had an ambivalent, if not disdainful relationship with war movies in general, and American patriotism in particular.
See full article at The Wrap »

Blu-ray Review: Glorious ‘JFK 50th Commemorative Ultimate Collector’s Edition’

Chicago – Oliver Stone reached the peak of his fascination with controversy, history, and epic productions when he made 1991’s “JFK,” arguably the masterpiece of the director of “Platoon,” “Natural Born Killers,” “Nixon,” and many more beloved films. “JFK” is a remarkable cinematic achievement, a movie that has lost none of its power 22 years after its release, looking like something that could come out today, especially now that we’re in the peak of Kennedy mania as we approach the 50th anniversary of his assassination, one of the most important events in American history.

Rating: 5.0/5.0

Whether or not you believe Stone’s conspiracy-based version of events or not, “JFK” is a masterful film in terms of acting, directing, and every technical element. It is a major accomplishment treated as such in this collector’s edition that includes three other discs besides the Director’s Cut of the film, all feature-length, along with unique physical collectibles.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

'Cold Case JFK,' 'Secrets of the Dead': JFK assassination anniversary specials

On Nov. 22, America marks the 50th anniversary of the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy - and television is giving viewers plenty to think about.

"Nova: Cold Case JFK" (PBS, Wednesday, Nov. 13): With a nod to the enduring conspiracy theories surrounding the assassination, the science series enlists modern investigators with state-of-the-art forensic tools to see if they can do a better job sorting out the evidence than was done in the '60s.

"Secrets of the Dead: JFK: One Pm Central Standard Time" (PBS, Wednesday): CBS news footage chronicles the assassination minute by minute, including Walter Cronkite's emotional report of Kennedy's death.

"Letters to Jackie: Remembering President Kennedy" (TLC, Nov. 17): Actors including Laura Linney and John Krasinski bring to life some of the condolence letters written to Jacqueline Kennedy after her husband's death.

"Where Were You? The Day JFK Died Reported by Tom Brokaw" (NBC,
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

TCM To Commemorate 50th Anniversary of JFK Assassination

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) will commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Nov. 22nd assassination of President John F. Kennedy with a primetime lineup on Thursday Nov. 21 featuring five powerful documentaries about Kennedy’s election, presidency and tragic death. Also included is a popular drama about Kennedy’s service during World War II.

TCM’s commemoration of the 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination will open with four works by documentary filmmaker Robert Drew, considered a pioneer of the cinéma verité. Drew’s use of new light-weight cameras traditional allowed him to capture reality as never before, leading to a filmmaking movement known as “direct cinema.” He utilized the new cameras for the first time while chronicling the election of John F. Kennedy in Primary (1960), airing at 8 p.m. (Et), which focuses on the 1960 Wisconsin Democratic Primary contest between Kennedy and Hubert Humphrey.

Primary will be followed by the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Review: JFK Drama 'Parkland' Starring Zac Efron, Paul Giamatti & More Feels Like A Cheap Cash-In

Ever since "Pt 109," which detailed his WWII war record and was released while he was still in office, President John F. Kennedy has been catnip to Hollywood. After all, he was good looking, charismatic, had a dark secret life of womanising, among other things, and of course, was assassinated three years into his presidency—an event that inspires debate and conspiracy theories to this day. He's been the subject of great films (Oliver Stone's "JFK") and bad ones (recent miniseries "The Kennedys"), and been played by everyone from Cliff Robertson to James Marsden (in "Lee Daniels' The Butler"). This November marks the 50th anniversary of his assassination in Dealey Plaza, and as such, it was inevitable that there'd be some kind of film to mark the occasion. We just wish it wasn't as terrible as "Parkland." Produced by Tom Hanks and Bill Paxton (Kevin Bacon and Gary Sinise
See full article at The Playlist »

Venice Review: JFK Drama 'Parkland' Starring Zac Efron, Billy Bob Thornton & Jacki Weaver

Ever since "Pt 109," which detailed his WWII war record and was released while he was still in office, President John F. Kennedy has been catnip to Hollywood. After all, he was good looking, charismatic, had a dark secret life of womanising, among other things, and of course, was assassinated three years into his presidency—an event that inspires debate and conspiracy theories to this day. He's been the subject of great films (Oliver Stone's "JFK") and bad ones (recent miniseries "The Kennedys"), and been played by everyone from Cliff Robertson to James Marsden (in "Lee Daniels' The Butler"). This November marks the 50th anniversary of his assassination in Dealey Plaza, and as such, it was inevitable that there'd be some kind of film to mark the occasion. We just wish it wasn't as terrible as "Parkland," which premieres (in competition, inexplicably) at the Venice Film Festival today. Produced
See full article at The Playlist »

Blu-ray Release: JFK 50th Commemorative Uce

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: Nov. 12, 2013

Price: Blu-ray $59.99

Studio: Warner Bros. Home Entertainment

Nov. 22, 2013, marks 50 years since the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, and Warner honors the anniversary with the release of a new version of Oliver Stone’s (Savages) Oscar-winning movie: JFK 50th Commemorative Ultimate Collector’s Edition.

The 1991, R-rated film looks at the aftermath of the killing, with New Orleans Da Jim Garrison (Kevin Costner, Dances With Wolves) suspicious of the FBI’s official story and launching his own investigation. Like in many of Stone’s movies, Garrison discovers that there’s more to the story than what the public is being told.

JFK won Academy Awards for Best Cinematography and Best Film Editing, and was nominated for another six, including Stone for Best Director, Tommy Lee Jones (The Fugitive) for Best Supporting Actor, John Williams’ original score, the adapted screenplay and the biggie, Best Picture.

The cast
See full article at Disc Dish »

Remembering Cliff Robertson: from Kennedy and Charly to David Begelman

Remembering Cliff Robertson: from Kennedy and Charly to David Begelman
Cliff Robertson passed of natural causes on September 10. The actor, whose credits span over fifty years, is known most recently for his role as Ben Parker in the Spider-Man franchise, and will be remembered most for his Oscar-winning role in 1968's Charly and 1963's Pt 109, in which he played John F. Kennedy. (My favorites are his angry safecracker in Sam Fuller's Underworld USA and unhappy husband in Brian De Palma's Obsession.) Here is a round-up of the media's coverage of Robertson's life and career, as well as photos and clips from his films and interviews: The NY Times describes him as "the ruggedly handsome actor who won an Oscar for Charly but found himself frozen out of Hollywood for almost four years after ...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Cliff Robertson, 1923 - 2011

  • MUBI
"Cliff Robertson, who starred as John F Kennedy in a 1963 World War II drama and later won an Academy Award for his portrayal of a mentally disabled bakery janitor in the movie Charly, died Saturday, one day after his 88th birthday," reports Dennis McLellan in the Los Angeles Times, adding that Robertson " also played a real-life role as the whistle-blower in the check-forging scandal of then-Columbia Pictures President David Begelman that rocked Hollywood in the late 1970s… In a more than 50-year career in films, Robertson appeared in some 60 movies, including Pt 109, My Six Loves, Sunday in New York, The Best Man, The Devil's Brigade, Three Days of the Condor, Obsession and Star 80. More recently, he played Uncle Ben Parker in the Spider-Man films."

In Charly, "he played a lovable bakery worker with the Iq of a 5-year-old whose intelligence is raised to genius level by an experiment,
See full article at MUBI »

Tributes to TV Spartacus star Andy Whitfield and Spider-Man's Cliff Robertson

Andy Whitfield, who played the title role in the Starz TV series Spartacus: Blood And Sand, has died of cancer, aged 39.

Whitfield, who was born in Wales and moved to Australia in 1999, passed away in Sydney yesterday, September 11, surrounded by his family and in the arms of his wife Vashti. His death comes 18 months after being diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Vashti said: "Thank you to all his fans whose love and support have help carry him to this point. He will be remembered as the inspiring, courageous and gentle man, father and husband he was."

Co-star Lucy Lawless praised his "incandescent presence" and said: "Andy Whitfield left an indelible mark on all of us in the Spartacus family. He was a gentle man... and a brilliant actor."

Andy was set to shoot the second season of the show when he found out about his illness. The network delayed filming for
See full article at The Geek Files »

So Long Mr. Cliff Robertson!

Cliff Robertson passed away Saturday in Stony Brook, NY. The Oscar winner was 88. In 1969, Robertson took home the gold beating out Alan Arkin ("The Heart is a Lonely Hunter"), Peter O'Toole ("The Lion in Winter"), Alan Bates ("The Fixer), and Ron Moody ("Oliver!"). But Robertson's performance in "Charly" was deemed the best of the year (see clip below).

In 2002's "Spider-Man," Robertson, playing Uncle Ben, uttered the famous line that became the crux of the franchise -- "With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility."

Here's more on the brilliant life of Cliff Robertson from the NY Daily News:

Robertson, a native of La Jolla, California, had already won an Emmy when he had his moment of big-screen recognition in 1968 -- 13 years after his feature debut in "Picnic." Though he played JFK as a young naval officer in "Pt 109 " - released five months before Dealey Plaza -- and gave an icy
See full article at Manny the Movie Guy »

'Spider-Man' Actor Cliff Robertson Dies

Cliff Robertson, the man who first taught Peter Parker about great power coming with great responsibility — or, more accurately, the actor who expressed such advice over the course of three previous "Spider-Man" movies — has died.

The Academy Award winning actor passed away over the weekend, just one day after his 88th birthday. He died of natural causes at Stony Brook University Medical Center on Long Island, according to a family statement.

Robertson is best known to modern audiences for playing Uncle Ben Parker in director Sam Raimi's trilogy of "Spider-Man" movies, his character routinely serving as a voice of reason to our friendly neighborhood superhero both in the mortal realm and often from beyond the grave.

Robertson is not the first major actor from Raimi's era of "Spider-Man" movies to die this year: Randy "Macho Man" Savage, who appeared in the first "Spider-Man" film as Bone Saw McGraw — the
See full article at MTV Splash Page »

R.I.P. Cliff Robertson & Andy Whitfield

Two actors familiar to genre audiences passed away over the weekend - one an Oscar winning veteran with a long career behind him, the other a young star unfairly cut down in his prime.

Cliff Robertson, whom most will recognise these days for his portrayal of Peter Parker's father figure Uncle Ben in Sam Raimi's "Spider-Man", passed away at age 88 from natural causes.

Robertson scored an Oscar in 1968 for the lead role in "Charly", an adaptation of "Flowers for Algernon". Other notable roles included "Pt 109," "The Best Man," "Gidget," "Three Days of the Condor," "J.W. Coop" and various TV shows like "Falcon Crest," "Batman" and "The Twilight Zone".

The other tragedy today was the death of 39-year-old "Spartacus: Blood and Sand" star Andy Whitfield. The Welsh-born, Australian-trained actor got his start in Australia in guest roles on numerous local dramas including "All Saints," "Packed to the Rafters" and
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Oscar-Winning Actor Cliff Robertson Passes Away

Cliff Robertson as Uncle Ben Parker in Spider-Man (2002)Long time actor Cliff Robertson, 88, passed away of natural causes on Saturday, September 10 just a day after his 88th birthday.  His secretary of 53 years, Evelyn Christel, said he died at Stonybrook University Medical Center in Long Island, NY.

The actor won an Academy Award for his performance as a mentally disabled man in the movie Charly (1968), though his big break came when he was picked by late President John F. Kennedy to play a young JFK in the WWII made for TV movie Pt 109 (1963).
See full article at Get The Big Picture »

R.I.P. Cliff Robertson (1923-2011)

The Academy Award-winning actor and screen veteran Cliff Robertson passed away yesterday from natural causes at Stony Brook University Medical Center, just one day after celebrating his 88th birthday. Beginning his acting career in the 1950s, Robertson made a number of film and television appearances such as Rod Brown of the Rocket Rangers (1953-1954), Picnic (1955), Gidget (1959), The Untouchables (1959), The Twilight Zone (1961-1962) and The Outer Limits (1963) before enjoying a breakthrough as Lt. John F. Kennedy in the war-time biopic Pt 109 (1963). From 1966-1968, Robertson went on to make a number of appearances in the Batman television show, and in 1969 he received the Academy Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role for his performance in Ralph Nelson's 1968 drama Charly.

Following his Oscar success, Robertson remained a popular supporting actor, juggling appearances in films such as Three Days of the Condor (1975), Battle of Midway (1976), Star 80 (1983) and Renaissance Man (1994) with
See full article at Flickeringmyth »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed