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Carol Lynley Dies: ‘The Poseidon Adventure’ Actress Was 77

  • Deadline
Carol Lynley Dies: ‘The Poseidon Adventure’ Actress Was 77
Actress Carol Lynley, whose popularity in the 1960s and ’70s grew with films Return to Peyton Place, Under the Yum Yum Tree and Bunny Lake is Missing, as well as TV appearances in some of the most watched series of the era while peaking with 1972’s disaster film classic The Poseidon Adventure, died Tuesday after suffering a heart attack at her home in Pacific Palisades, CA. She was 77.

Her death was announced by her friend, the actor Trent Dolan.

With a modeling background, Lynley had a few small credits (she was Rapunzel in 1958 on TV’s Shirley Temple’s Storybook) before really making a name for herself that year in James Leo Herlihy’s controversial Broadway play Blue Denim, in which she portrayed a pregnant teenager seeking an illegal abortion. She starred in the feature film adaptation the following year, scoring a
See full article at Deadline »

Carol Lynley, ‘The Poseidon Adventure’ Star, Dies at 77

  • Variety
Carol Lynley, ‘The Poseidon Adventure’ Star, Dies at 77
Actress Carol Lynley, best known for her role in the 1972 film “The Poseidon Adventure,” died at her Pacific Palisades home Tuesday after suffering a heart attack, according to her friend, actor Trent Dolan. She was 77.

Lynley began her career as a child model, appearing on the cover of Life magazine at the age of 15, before starring in Disney’s “The Light in the Forest” and the independent film “Holiday for Lovers.” Shortly after, she secured a breakout role in the 1958 Broadway play “Blue Denim” and its subsequent film adaptation, in which she played 15-year-old Janet Willard tasked with figuring out how to undergo an illegal abortion.

The play, written by James Leo Herlihy, received immediate criticism for its laissez-faire attitude toward abortion, leading to a revised ending in the film that sees Janet go through with her pregnancy. Despite the controversy, the role earned Lynley a nomination for a Golden
See full article at Variety »

Barbara Stanwyck movies: 20 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Barbara Stanwyck movies: 20 greatest films ranked from worst to best
She was one of the hardest working, most versatile actresses of the Golden Era of Hollywood, lauded by directors, costars and crew members for her professionalism and pleasant demeanor. During a time when most actors were typecasts, her most famous roles included a range of characters from society lady to sassy con artist, working class girl to helpless invalid and from heartbroken mother to one of the most infamous femme fatales of film noir.

Barbara Stanwyck was born Ruby Catherine Stevens on July 16, 1907, in Brooklyn, NY. Orphaned very young, Ruby dropped out of school at the age of 14, starting a series of odd jobs, eventually working for the telephone company. However, she had big dreams, and was soon a chorus girl in several shows, including the Ziegfeld Follies. In 1926, she had a part in the moderately successful play “The Noose,” and decided to change her name – “Barbara” was the name of her character,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Barbara Stanwyck movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Double Indemnity,’ ‘The Lady Eve,’ ‘Ball of Fire’

  • Gold Derby
Barbara Stanwyck movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Double Indemnity,’ ‘The Lady Eve,’ ‘Ball of Fire’
She was one of the hardest working, most versatile actresses of the Golden Era of Hollywood, lauded by directors, costars and crew members for her professionalism and pleasant demeanor. During a time when most actors were typecasts, her most famous roles included a range of characters from society lady to sassy con artist, working class girl to helpless invalid and from heartbroken mother to one of the most infamous femme fatales of film noir.

Barbara Stanwyck was born Ruby Catherine Stevens on July 16, 1907, in Brooklyn, New York. Orphaned very young, Ruby dropped out of school at the age of 14, starting a series of odd jobs, eventually working for the telephone company. However, she had big dreams, and was soon a chorus girl in several shows, including the Ziegfeld Follies. In 1926, she had a part in the moderately successful play “The Noose,” and decided to change her name – “Barbara” was the name of her character,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Christopher Knopf Dies: Former President Of The Writers Guild Of America West Was 91

  • Deadline
Christopher Knopf Dies: Former President Of The Writers Guild Of America West Was 91
Christopher Knopf, the former president of the Writers Guild of America West, died on Wednesday at age 91 of congestive heart failure.

The Emmy nominated writer also served as president of the International Writers Guild and national chairman of the WGA. He received 10 Writers Guild nominations, winning three.

Knopf’s credits included “Scott Joplin: King of Ragtime,” “Mrs. Sundance,” “Baby Girl Scott,” “Peter and Paul,” and the pilot for “The Big Valley.” His Emmy nominations came for “The Girl Who Spelled Freedom” and “Loudmouth.”

He also won an Asian Pacific Media Award and a Christopher Award for “The Girl Who Spelled Freedom.”

Born in New York City, Knopf attended UCLA, leaving during his senior year to join the Air Force during World War II. He later finished his degree at Uc Berkeley before embarking on a long writing career.

Knopf received the Morgan Cox Award in 1991 and the Edmund H. North Award in 2002 from WGA West.
See full article at Deadline »

TV Writer Christopher Knopf, Former WGA West President, Dies at 91

  • Variety
TV Writer Christopher Knopf, Former WGA West President, Dies at 91
Prolific Emmy-nominated television writer Christopher Edwin Knopf, former president of the Writers Guild of America West, died in his sleep of congestive heart failure on Feb. 13. He was 91.

Knopf was born in New York and attended UCLA, leaving during his senior year to join the Air Force during World War II. He finished his studies at U.C. Berkeley, graduating in 1950, and began a 50-year career as a writer for motion picture and television.

He served as president of the International Writers Guild, national chairman of the WGA and president of the WGA West during 1965-67. He received 10 Writers Guild nominations and won three of them.

Knopf received the Morgan Cox Award in 1991 and the Edmund H. North Award in 2002 from WGA West.

Knopf’s credits include “Scott Joplin: King of Ragtime,” “Mrs. Sundance,” “The Girl Who Spelled Freedom,” “Baby Girl Scott,” “Peter and Paul,” and the pilot for “The Big Valley.
See full article at Variety »

Christopher Knopf, 'Emperor of the North' Screenwriter, Dies at 91

Christopher Knopf, 'Emperor of the North' Screenwriter, Dies at 91
Christopher Knopf, the prolific screenwriter behind Emperor of the North, 20 Million Miles to Earth and a host of TV Westerns in the 1950s and '60s, has died. He was 91.

Knopf died Wednesday of congestive heart failure at his home in Santa Monica, a family member told The Hollywood Reporter.

Knopf wrote for the CBS Western Zane Grey Theater, starring Dick Powell, and its spinoff, Trackdown, starring Robert Culp; penned the pilot episode for ABC's The Big Valley; and created CBS' Cimarron Strip, starring Stuart Whitman.

His much-admired television work also included 1977's Scott Joplin: King of Ragtime (for which he won a Writers ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Chamber Of Horrors (1966)

1953’s House of Wax with Vincent Price cast a long shadow fairly early in the horror world; creepy Grand Guignol (in 3D no less) with a strong thread of vengeance gave us further goodies such as Tourist Trap (1979) and a recently reappraised remake in 2005. It’s not surprising then that TV would take a crack at molding its own vicious visage; what they came up with is a pilot film that executives deemed too shocking for the small screen – Chamber of Horrors (1966), a decidedly ghoulish take on necrophilia and murder mixed with breezy banter and chopped up body parts. I think the brass may have been right to send this one to the big screen.

Before you get too excited, we’re not talking Blood Feast here; it’s incredibly tame by today’s standards. No, it’s the subject matter itself which would send mom and dad into epileptic fits,
See full article at DailyDead »

Where Are They Now?: Veteran Stuntman Gene LeBell, a.k.a. the Toughest Man Alive

  • Variety
Artisans introduces a new series — Where Are They Now? — focusing on living legends of the below-the-line world. Written by James C. Udel, a member of Iatse’s Local 80 Grips since 1993 and author of “The Film Crew of Hollywood,” these stories will profile retired or semiretired artisans whose work has left an enduring impact on the history of the movies.

Stuntman Gene LeBell might not have been around since Hollywood’s first fist fight, but his skill has transformed the genre.

Born in Los Angeles in 1932, LeBell was shipped off to a military school at age 6 by his full-time working mom after his father died in a surfing accident. The diminutive kid was bullied, finally responding by choking the offending cadet — a move he applied to Steven Seagal 52 years later while filming “Hard to Kill.”

After his mom remarried, LeBell was raised near L.A.’s old Olympic Auditorium. The athletic
See full article at Variety »

The Big Country

Ya know, “It’s a Big Country!” Westerns and pacifism are like oil and water, but William Wyler, Jessamyn West and three other top writers found a way for Gregory Peck to surmount eight showdowns and never fire a pistol in anger. Jean Simmons and Charlton Heston win top acting honors, while Burl Ives earns his Oscar, Carroll Baker gets the thankless role and composer Jerome Moross makes western music history. MGM’s remastering job fixes the problems of an earlier Blu-ray, and even brings the title sequence up to tip top condition. Plus several hours of special extras.

The Big Country

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1958 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 166 min. / Street Date June 5, 2018 / 60th Anniversary Edition / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Gregory Peck, Jean Simmons, Carroll Baker, Charlton Heston, Burl Ives, Charles Bickford, Alfonso Bedoya, Chuck Connors, Chuck Hayward, Dorothy Adams, Chuck Roberson.

Cinematography: Franz F. Planer

Film Editor: Robert Swink
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Joseph Campanella Dies: TV & Film Actor With 200 Credits Over Six Decades Was 92

Joseph Campanella Dies: TV & Film Actor With 200 Credits Over Six Decades Was 92
Joseph Campanella, a prolific character actor whose career on the big and small screens spanned more than a half-century, died today at his home in Sherman Oaks, CA. He was 92.

Among his nearly 200 credits were a regular in the role in first season of the 1967-75 CBS cop drama Mannix, for which he earned an Emmy nom, and a Daytime Emmy-nominated late-’80s/early-’90s role as Harper Deveraux in the long-running NBC soap Days of Our Lives (right). He also appeared as Jonathan Young in nearly 100 episodes of CBS’ soap The Bold and the Beautiful from 1996-2005.

With a face known to most fans of TV from the latter half of the 20th century, Campanella started his career in 1950s television, guesting on such classic series of that decade and the next as Suspense, Route 66, The Big Valley, The Wild Wild West, The Fugitive and Mission: Impossible. After
See full article at Deadline »

Yvonne Craig Embraces Her Batgirl Legacy in a Recovered Interview (Exclusive)

Less than a year before her passing in 2015, actress Yvonne Craig was chatting with me about the enduring nature of the 1960s Batman series that starred Adam West in the title role, Burt Ward as his sidekick, Robin; and Yvonne herself in the dual role of Barbara Gordon and Batgirl. The complete series had been issued on Blu-ray at the time, which explained the excitement of the moment, but not the fact that people still loved that show nearly 50 years after its debut. “Part of it is that it is that it's a sign of our times,” she said. “Everyone would like to go back to the time of ‘Flower Power.’ You know, rather than blowing people up in all these different places like they are in the world, people are looking for an escape. And this is not only an escape, but it’s stilly and fun and filled with pretty colors.
See full article at Closer Weekly »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Night Walker (1964)

William Castle is a name synonymous with hucksterism and showmanship, more so than the quality of the films he directed. Which isn’t really fair, it’s just that his gimmicky pieces like The House on Haunted Hill and The Tingler (both 1959), with skeletons flying through the audience and buzzers placed under theatre seats respectively, overshadowed an unsubtle but solid directorial style when unburdened by showbiz trappings. Such is the case with The Night Walker (1964), a Robert Bloch (Psycho) scripted thriller that delves into the dream world in effective ways.

Released in late December by Universal, The Night Walker received some good notices but left audiences sleepy. Perhaps the perceived combination of shock master Bloch and schlock meister Castle didn’t match what made it to the screen; indeed it’s a different tale told in a different manner than either was used to telling, yet has a sometimes eerie
See full article at DailyDead »

Lee Majors Remembers His Bionic Days as 'The Six Million Dollar Man' (Exclusive)

Col. Steve Austin, astronaut, survived the catastrophic crash of a test vehicle, and even went up against Bigfoot without breaking a sweat. But now — at this moment in time — he actually looks nervous. And it’s not a nervousness born out of another mission that, given his bionically-enhanced arm, legs and eye, only he can pull off to save the world from destruction. These are the nerves of the actor who played him, Lee Majors, The Six Million Dollar Man himself, who is getting ready for his first appearance at a comic/media convention. “I’ve never done one before,” he admits to me not long before appearing at the the Wizard World Big Apple Comic Con in New York back in October of 2010. “I just hope they all like me… I don’t want the crazies.” He lets out a short laugh at that, but isn’t entirely convincing.
See full article at Closer Weekly »

Comedian Marty Allen Dead at 95

Comedian Marty Allen Dead at 95
Comedian Marty Allen, who rose to fame as part of the comedy duo Allen & Rossi in the 1950s and ’60s, died Monday in Las Vegas. He was 95.

Allen’s spokeswoman confirmed to the Associated Press that he died of complications from pneumonia, with his wife, singer-songwriter Karon Kate Blackwell, by his side.

After beginning his career as an opening act for such stars as Nat King Cole and jazz singer Sarah Vaughan, Allen teamed up with fellow comic Steve Rossi to become the duo Allen & Rossi. They performed together from 1957 to 1968 and made more than 700 TV appearances, including 44 stints on The Ed Sullivan Show.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Batman: Los Angeles & MeTV Plan Adam West Tributes

Tonight, the city of Los Angeles will pay tribute to the late Adam West, the man behind the first live-action Batman and Bruce Wayne, in ABC's 1966-68 Batman TV series. L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti and Police Chief Charlie Beck and guests will hold a ceremonial lighting of the Bat-Signal at City Hall on the Spring St. steps, tonight at 9:00pm Pt. Surprise Bat-guests will reportedly take part in the event. On Saturday, June 17th, MeTV will pay tribute to West, with its “The Best of Adam West” programming block. The special will include memorable episodes of Batman, Maverick, The Big Valley, Gunsmoke, Bonanza, The Rifleman, and The Outer Limits, featuring West. Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Top 21 Non-Traditional Christmas Movies To Watch

As we head into the holiday season, Wamg brings you our list of the Best Non-Traditional Christmas Movies to watch after the Holiday ham, pretty presents, and multiple viewings of White Christmas, Home Alone and Miracle On 34th Street are a thing of Christmas Past.

Our choices are filled snarky mistletoe carnage and crafty comedy – Geek style. Santa Claus is coming to town in these “More Naughty Than Nice”. films.

We’ve made a list and checked it twice with our lineup of not just the 20 Best holiday films but the Top 21 Non-Traditional Christmas Movies. After the success of Krampus, we just had to add it!

We kick off our list with our Honorable Mention –

Jingle All The Way

Christmas; It’s the most magical time of the year. High powered businessman Howard Langston (Arnold Schwarzenegger), is hard at work taking last-minute orders from customers to whom he just can
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Michael Gleason Dies; ‘Remington Steele’ Co-Creator Was 78

Michael Gleason, the co-creator of Remington Steele and producer of such popular series as Diagnosis Murder and Rich Man Poor Man Book 2, died Friday at the age of 78. His death was confirmed on his Facebook page; no cause was listed. Gleason, a novelist as well as veteran producer, started as a writer for such 1960s series as Rawhide, Laramie, My Favorite Martian, The Big Valley and Peyton Place, continuing through the ’70s with Marcus Welby, M.D., Cannon, McCloud and Ric…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Fantastic Fest 2016 Interview: Lee Majors on Becoming Brock Williams for Ash Vs Evil Dead

  • DailyDead
Last week at the 2016 Fantastic Fest, Daily Dead had the opportunity to sit down for a quick chat with legendary actor Lee Majors, who has been a fixture on American television since the 1960s, and has now joined Starz’s hit series Ash vs Evil Dead to play Brock Williams, Ash’s estranged father who still lives in Michigan and must contend with the infamous legacy his son has left behind.

Check out what Majors had to say about joining the AvED family, his career, what’s next for him, and more. And be sure to check out the first episode of Ash vs Evil Dead when it premieres later tonight on Starz at 8:00pm Et.

[Spoiler Warning - Events from the first few episodes are discussed.]

Great to speak with you today, Lee. One thing that’s always been apparent to me when chatting with anyone from this show, is that this whole team is a real family. Has
See full article at DailyDead »

Lee Majors Is Ash's Dad in 'Ash Vs Evil Dead' Season 2

Lee Majors Is Ash's Dad in 'Ash Vs Evil Dead' Season 2
Starz has announced today that Lee Majors (Do You Believe?) will play the role of Brock Williams, Ash's father, and Ted Raimi (Xena: Warrior Princess, Spider-Man) will play the role of Ash's childhood best friend, Chet Kaminski, in the Starz Original series Ash Vs. Evil Dead. The series was previously renewed for a second season and will return in 2016. Starz hasn't announced when the show will premiere yet, or when production may begin.

Majors started his television career in The Big Valley, going on to The Men from Shiloh, to Owen Marshall Counselor at Law to The Six Million Dollar Man to The Fall Guy to Tour of Duty to Raven and countless television appearances on many series, specials, award shows and movies. He began his film career with Will Penny alongside Charlton Heston. Majors recently completed filming two movies Almosting It and Do You Believe?. Majors will start filming
See full article at MovieWeb »
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