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Ginger Rogers movies: 20 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Ginger Rogers movies: 20 greatest films ranked from worst to best
“Sure he was great, but don’t forget that Ginger Rogers did everything he did. . . backwards and in high heels.”

This quote from a 1982 Frank and Ernest cartoon sums up one of the greatest dance duos in film history, the debonair Fred Astaire and the tenacious Ginger Rogers. For July 16, we celebrate the spunky Ms. Rogers on what would have been her 109th birthday.

She was born Virginia Katherine McMath in Independence, Missouri. Her parents divorced when she was young, and she moved to Texas with her mother. She never saw her birth father again, and when her mother remarried, she adopted her stepfather’s surname of Rogers. A young cousin had trouble saying “Virginia”, so she became “Ginger”. Her mother was a career woman, involved in show business, as a scriptwriter among other things, and was a huge influence on Rogers for all her life. She got her own
See full article at Gold Derby »

Ginger Rogers movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Kitty Foyle,’ ‘Top Hat,’ ‘Swing Time’

  • Gold Derby
Ginger Rogers movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Kitty Foyle,’ ‘Top Hat,’ ‘Swing Time’
“Sure he was great, but don’t forget that Ginger Rogers did everything he did. . . backwards and in high heels.”

This quote from a 1982 Frank and Ernest cartoon sums up one of the greatest dance duos in film history, the debonair Fred Astaire and the tenacious Ginger Rogers. For July 16, we celebrate the spunky Ms. Rogers on what would have been her 109th birthday.

SEEFred Astaire movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best

She was born Virginia Katherine McMath in Independence, Missouri. Her parents divorced when she was young, and she moved to Texas with her mother. She never saw her birth father again, and when her mother remarried, she adopted her stepfather’s surname of Rogers. A young cousin had trouble saying “Virginia”, so she became “Ginger”. Her mother was a career woman, involved in show business, as a scriptwriter among other things, and was a huge influence on Rogers for all her life.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Georgia Engel, "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" Star, Dies at 70

  • The Wrap
Georgia Engel,
Georgia Engel, who starred as Georgette Franklin on the “Mary Tyler Moore Show” between 1972 and 1977, has died at the age of 70, according to the New York Times.

She died late last week in Princeton, New Jersey. A cause of death had not been determined; the actress was a Christian Scientist and didn’t see a doctor, Engel’s friend John Quilty told the Times.

After beginning her career in theater in the late 1960s and early ’70s, Engel made her name on television co-starring on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” in 1972. As the flighty girlfriend of Ted Knight’s news anchor character, Ted Baxter, Engel earned two Emmy nominations for supporting actress in a comedy.

She would later go on to star on the short-lived comedies “The Betty White Show” and NBC’s “Jennifer Slept Here,” in addition to later recurring roles on “Coach,
See full article at The Wrap »

Bette Midler Sings and Gets Emotional About the Environment at Power of Women Event

  • Variety
Bette Midler Sings and Gets Emotional About the Environment at Power of Women Event
“I figured it out early: if you didn’t get cast, or didn’t care to play the game, you’d better figure out how to put on your own show.” Words to live by from Bette Midler.

Beginning by singing a bit of “There’s No Business Like Show Business,” the Broadway star and actress revealed the inspiration behind her famous personality — the Divine Miss M — at Variety‘s Power of Women NY event presented by Lifetime.

“Nowadays everybody calls our work ‘the industry.’ I call it ‘the biz,’ or ‘the business,’ because I’m old school and I’ve always, always been riveted by the feuds, the fights, the hits, the misses, the disses, the slights. Despite what the song says, as we all have come to realize, everything about it is not appealing.” She continued, revealing that if no one was going to cast her in a production,
See full article at Variety »

Bette Midler Gets Candid About Hollywood, Feminism and Trump

  • Variety
Bette Midler Gets Candid About Hollywood, Feminism and Trump
Long before Reese Witherspoon or Nicole Kidman produced their own material, Bette Midler was calling all the shots on her productions. In 1985, she signed a blockbuster multi-movie deal at Disney’s Touchstone Pictures, making her the highest-paid actress of her time. But in addition to a massive paycheck, she also wanted to be empowered to make decisions. Midler launched her company All Girl Prods. to steer her own soon-to-be hits, such as “Beaches,” “For the Boys” and “Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood.”

“I had always felt from the time I started in the business that there was a kind of bias against women in positions of power,” Midler tells Variety on a recent afternoon in Los Angeles. “If you went to a pitch meeting, you’d often be the only female in the room.”

Midler, now 73, loved the feminist name of her new enterprise. Her producing partner, Bonnie Bruckheimer,
See full article at Variety »

‘Pose’: Ryan Murphy Reveals Season 2 Details, Including a Time Jump and New Cast

‘Pose’: Ryan Murphy Reveals Season 2 Details, Including a Time Jump and New Cast
Ryan Murphy is an industry veteran, and his experience shone as he moderated the “Pose” PaleyFest panel Saturday night. Alternating between personal insights and newsy revelations, the co-creator and executive producer of FX’s groundbreaking drama got the most out of his time in Dolby Theater.

On the news front, Murphy revealed the setting of Season 2 as well as some new cast members. “Season 2 is very exciting,” Murphy said. “It starts in 1990 — the day Madonna releases ‘Vogue,’ and along with our wonderful [returning] cast, we have wonderful additions. Sandra Bernhard is a series regular.”

Pose” Season 1 took place in 1987 and 1988. Dominique Jackson summed up the cast’s position — who were surprised by every announcement of the night — when she said, “I have no idea what’s going on, but for Season 2 I honestly trust in the writing and realize that sometimes we have to let go.”

Murphy surprised actress Mj Rodriguez
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscars long love affair with foreign language films

Oscars long love affair with foreign language films
There are a lot of Oscar firsts surrounding Alfonso Cuaron’s acclaimed Mexican drama, “Roma.” History will be made if it wins Best Picture and Best Foreign Language Film, as well as being the first movie in Spanish and Mixtec languages to take home the top Academy Award.

With history “Roma” on the cusp of rewriting the Oscar history book, let’s look back at some foreign language Oscar firsts.

The first foreign film to earn an Oscar nomination was Rene Clair’s delightful French satire “A Nous La Liberte” for Best Art Drection in the ceremony’s fifth year.

It was 80 years ago that the academy nominated a foreign-language film for the Best Picture Oscar when Jean Renoir’s anti-war masterpiece “Grand Illusion,” was one of 10 nominees for the top prize. Though the film lost to Frank Capra’s “You Can’t Take It With you,” the French drama
See full article at Gold Derby »

How Ariana Grande’s ‘7 Rings’ Took a ‘Sound of Music’ Classic to the Top

  • Variety
How Ariana Grande’s ‘7 Rings’ Took a ‘Sound of Music’ Classic to the Top
A few months before the film version of “The Sound of Music” hit the silver screen, a song plugger working the catalog of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein approached label owner Dave Kapp with a plan to turn one of the songs from the score into a hit single, thinking it would boost the box office potential of the movie. That resulted in Jack Jones recording “My Favorite Things” for his first Christmas album, but the song did not become a hit. That song plugger’s dream finally comes true this week, some 54 years after the film’s release, as “My Favorite Things” debuts at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100, thanks to a reinterpretation by Ariana Grande on her new single, “7 Rings.”

Grande updated the lyrics of the Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein classic after a shopping spree at Tiffany’s, transforming “Raindrops on roses/And whiskers on kittens/Bright
See full article at Variety »

‘The Wizard of Oz’ to Return to Theaters for 80th Anniversary

  • Variety
‘The Wizard of Oz’ to Return to Theaters for 80th Anniversary
The Wizard of Oz” is returning to theaters this weekend for a special limited engagement marking the 80th anniversary of the film’s Hollywood premiere. Fathom Events, TCM, and Warner Bros. are re-releasing the beloved family film in select theaters across the country beginning on Sunday, Jan. 27, with additional dates on Tuesday, Jan. 29, and Wednesday Jan. 30. You can see showtimes and reserve tickets here.

Based on the L. Frank Baum children’s book “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” (read the book here), “The Wizard of Oz” premiered in August of 1939, and dazzled audiences and critics alike. In his original review for Variety, movie critic John C. Flinn Sr. wrote, “Nothing comparable has come out of Hollywood in the past few years to approximate the lavish scale of this filmusical extravaganza, in the making of which the ingenuity and inventiveness of technical forces were employed without stint of effort or cost…
See full article at Variety »

Carol Channning Dead At 97

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Broadway legend Carol Channing has passed away from natural causes at age 97. To call her inimitable would be a misstatement as Ms. Channing was one of the most impersonated stars of all time. With her shocking white hairdo, expansive smile and gravelly voice, she endeared audiences and inspired careers for countless entertainers on the drag queen circuit. Channing became a Broadway star in 1949 with "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" and later became inextricably linked to the title role in the 1964 Broadway smash "Hello, Dolly!", for which she received the Tony Award. She was frustrated however, when she was not cast in the film versions of either musical, losing the roles to Marilyn Monroe and Barbra Streisand respectively. Ms. Channing also starred in her own television variety series in the 1960s. Surprisingly, she appeared in only a handful of feature films. She earned a Golden Globe and a Best Supporting
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Goodbye, Dolly! One-of-a-kind Broadway legend Carol Channing dies at 97

Goodbye, Dolly! One-of-a-kind Broadway legend Carol Channing dies at 97
“Laughter is much more important than applause. Applause is almost a duty. Laughter is a reward.” — Carol Channing

If anyone has heard her share of both gaffaws and clapping, it would be Channing, who died on Tuesday 16 days shy of her 98th birthday. The Seattle native broke out on Broadway in 1949 in as Lorelei Lee, an irrepressible man-crazy gold-digger from Little Rock, Arkansas, in “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.” She performed the showstopper, “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend,” which would be memorably warbled in the 1953 film version by Marilyn Monroe and influenced Madonna‘s 1985 music video for “Material Girl.”

Her unique voice, willowy stature and bigger-than-life personality proved to be a plus but also a minus, since she always fused her traits into her characters. In a cover story for Life magazine, she was described as “an over-grown kewpie” who sang like “a moon-mad hillbilly.” Still, Channing had out-sized talent
See full article at Gold Derby »

Carol Channing, Original Star of Broadway’s ‘Hello, Dolly,’ Dies at 97

Carol Channing, Original Star of Broadway’s ‘Hello, Dolly,’ Dies at 97
Carol Channing, who originated the role of Dolly Levi in “Hello Dolly!” and Lorelei Lee in “Gentlemen Prefer Blonds” on Broadway, has died at age 97.

The Oscar-nominated actress died early Tuesday morning at her home in Rancho Mirage, Calif., just weeks before what would have been her 98th birthday, her publicist B. Harlan Boll told TheWrap.

Channing came to national prominence as the star of the Broadway musical “Hello, Dolly!” in 1964. Her performance as matchmaker Dolly Levi won her the first of three Tony Awards (including one for lifetime achievement) for Best Actress in a Musical.

She appeared in two revivals of “Hello, Dolly!,” performing the role more than 5,000 times, missing only one show due to food poisoning.

Also Read: Carl Reiner Is the Oldest Emmy Nominee Ever at 96, but He's Still Got Work to Do (Video)

Channing is also known for her role of Lorelei Lee in “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.
See full article at The Wrap »

Event Cinema Shows Its Value With ‘Bts,’ ‘They Shall Not Grow Old’

  • Variety
Event cinema is coming of age as movie theaters increasingly look to live events and one-night screenings during the Sunday-Thursday corridor.

Bts concert documentary, “Burn the Stage: The Movie,” pulled in a record-setting $18 million in 79 territories at 2,650 movie theaters in three nights for Trafalgar Releasing — including $3.6 million in the U.S.

Peter Jackson’s World War I documentary “They Shall Not Grow Old” earned $2.3 million at 1,142 theaters in North America on Dec. 17 — marking the largest single night for a Fathom Events documentary. It will screen again at more than 900 locations on Dec. 27.

Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst with comScore, said the numbers show that 2018 is a turning point for event cinema.

“Though event cinema has been there all along, quietly and consistently drawing huge audiences while offering up great content to draw folks to the multiplex, 2018 is the year that this unsung (and oft under appreciated) hero of box office
See full article at Variety »

Film News Roundup: ‘Wizard of Oz’ to Launch TCM Big Screen Classics in 2019

  • Variety
Film News Roundup: ‘Wizard of Oz’ to Launch TCM Big Screen Classics in 2019
In today’s film news roundup, “The Wizard of Oz” leads off the 2019 TCM Big Screen Classics, “Jobe’z World” gets distribution, and Nrg and SAG-AFTRA make executive hires.

Classic Films

Fathom Events and Turner Classic Movies have unveiled 14 classic films that will be shown in theaters in 2019 in the TCM Big Screen Classics series, starting with “The Wizard of Oz” on Jan. 27, 29 and 30.

The other titles are “My Fair Lady,” “To Kill a Mockingbird,” “Ben-Hur,” “True Grit,” “Steel Magnolias,” “Field of Dreams,” “Glory,” “Hello, Dolly!,” “Lawrence of Arabia,” “The Shawshank Redemption,” “Alien,” “The Godfather Part II” and “When Harry Met Sally.”

Fathom specializes in event movies shown for one or two nights. It’s jointly owned by the AMC, Regal and Cinemark chains. The TCM Big Series titles will usually screen on Sundays and Wednesdays.

“Every year, more and more film fans have flocked to the TCM Big Screen Classics series,
See full article at Variety »

‘Star Trek’: Michael Chabon’s Won a Pulitzer, But Writing For Capt. Picard Turned Him Into a Fanboy

  • Indiewire
‘Star Trek’: Michael Chabon’s Won a Pulitzer, But Writing For Capt. Picard Turned Him Into a Fanboy
Michael Chabon, the Pulitzer-prize winning author of “The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay” as well as “The Mysteries of Pittsburgh” and “Wonder Boys,” sounded almost giddy on the phone. “It’s so much fun to be able to talk about ‘Star Trek,'” he said.

Chabon makes his television-writing debut with the newest installment of “Short Treks,” a series of”Star Trek: Discovery” short films on CBS All Access. But that’s really a prelude to the most exciting gig: being a part of the writers’ room for the upcoming series that marks the return of Patrick Stewart as Jean-Luc Picard.

Without revealing anything about Picard’s new adventures, Chabon said the experience working on the show left him flustered. “To be sitting in the room with Patrick Stewart, just sitting there next to me — I tried to be cool about it,” he said. “I think we all tried to be cool about it.
See full article at Indiewire »

Greenlit: ‘Mrs. Doubtfire’ Heads to Broadway, ‘Star Wars: Episode IX’ Adds Talent + More Projects

Greenlit means a project is officially a go, so all you have to do is follow these leads to stay up to date. You never know where you’ll find an opportunity to land an audition! “Mrs. Doubtfire” Help is on the way, dear: Mrs. Doubtfire is packing up and heading to Broadway! Four-time Tony Award winner Jerry Zaks, who’s most recent revival of “Hello, Dolly!” collected the award for Best Revival, will helm the production, with “Something Rotten!” scribes John O’Farrell and Karey Kirkpatrick writing the book and Karey and Wayne Kirkpatrick writing the music and lyrics. This is just the latest in a long list of classic films to get the greenlight for a screen to stage adaptation. Telsey + Company did the casting for both Zaks’s “Hello, Dolly!” and the Kirkpatricks’ “Something Rotten!”, so it would be no surprise if the company returned for this production.
See full article at Backstage »

Gene Kelly movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘An American in Paris,’ ‘Singin’ in the Rain,’ ‘Anchors Aweigh’

  • Gold Derby
Gene Kelly movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘An American in Paris,’ ‘Singin’ in the Rain,’ ‘Anchors Aweigh’
All hail legendary song-and-dance man Gene Kelly on the 106th anniversary of his birth on August 23. In the history of American film, there were unarguably two great male dancers — Fred Astaire and Kelly. Astaire’s style was romantic and sophisticated, with long lines and elegant movement. Kelly’s style was more athletic — a guy’s guy, if you will — with a scrappy style that set him apart from other dancers of his era.

Kelly appeared to be able to do it all. He could dance, sing, and act in his films, ultimately choreographing and directing them as well. In the course of his nearly four decades on film, he starred in such classics as “An American in Paris” and “Anchors Aweigh,” as well as starring and co-directing the great musicals “On the Town” and “Singin’ in the Rain.”

For his work, Kelly earned two Golden Globe nominations — one for Best
See full article at Gold Derby »

Gene Kelly movies: 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Gene Kelly movies: 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best
All hail legendary song-and-dance man Gene Kelly on the 106th anniversary of his birth on August 23. In the history of American film, there were unarguably two great male dancers — Fred Astaire and Kelly. Astaire’s style was romantic and sophisticated, with long lines and elegant movement. Kelly’s style was more athletic — a guy’s guy, if you will — with a scrappy style that set him apart from other dancers of his era.

Kelly appeared to be able to do it all. He could dance, sing, and act in his films, ultimately choreographing and directing them as well. In the course of his nearly four decades on film, he starred in such classics as “An American in Paris” and “Anchors Aweigh,” as well as starring and co-directing the great musicals “On the Town” and “Singin’ in the Rain.”

For his work, Kelly earned two Golden Globe nominations — one for Best
See full article at Gold Derby »

Hollywood Mourns Producer Craig Zadan: ‘He Had Music and Dance in His Soul’

  • Variety
Hollywood Mourns Producer Craig Zadan: ‘He Had Music and Dance in His Soul’
Friends and colleagues of Craig Zadan remembered the prolific producer of musicals, TV shows and movies for his talent in shepherding ambitious productions, for his loyalty and support and for his love of the industry.

Zadan’s death at 69 following complications from shoulder replacement surgery shocked the industry when the news broke Tuesday evening. Zadan and his longtime producing partner Neil Meron were among the industry’s busiest teams, steering numerous projects at any given time including NBC’s next live musical event, “Hair,” slated for 2019. The pair also produced the Oscar telecast for ABC from 2013 to 2015.

NBC Entertainment Chairman Robert Greenblatt announced Zadan’s death on Tuesday. “Craig’s distinguished career as a passionate and consummate producer is eclipsed only by his genuine love for the thousands of actors, directors, writers, musicians, designers, and technicians he worked with over the years. His absence will be felt in our hearts and throughout our business,
See full article at Variety »

Glenda Jackson Bringing ‘King Lear’ to Broadway

  • Variety
Glenda Jackson Bringing ‘King Lear’ to Broadway
At 82 years old, Glenda Jackson shows no signs of slowing down. Fresh off her Tony Award winning triumph in “Three Tall Women,” the acting legend has already lined up her Broadway return. And it’s a doozy.

Next spring, Jackson will play the title role in William Shakespeare’s “King Lear.” It’s a part that’s widely considered to be one of the most demanding and challenging ever written, requiring a formidable stamina and the ability to move from scenes of tenderness to ones of full-throttle rage.

The show is being backed by superstar producer Scott Rudin, the man behind Oscar-winning hits such as “No Country for Old Men” and stage blockbusters such as the current revival of “Hello, Dolly!

Jackson already has a full trophy case, having picked up two Oscars and two Emmys, but the role of Lear could bring her another Tony. She was nominated for
See full article at Variety »
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