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Lots of Blood on the Set of Joe Begos’ ‘V.F.W.’

Lots of Blood on the Set of Joe Begos’ ‘V.F.W.’
Director Joe Begos (Almost Human, The Mind’s Eye) took to Instagram to share a behind-the-scenes photo from the set of his now-filming action-horror film V.F.W. Described as The Wild Bunch meets Night Of The Living Dead, the photo shows Begos with actors Stephen Lang (Don’t Breathe), William Sadler (Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey) and Martin Kove (Karate Kid, Cobra Kai) on the set. All are completely covered in […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

How to do The Expendables 4

Tom Jolliffe looks ahead to The Expendables 4, and where the film can succeed (or fail)…

There comes a point in any franchise run, where time just sneaks up on it, yoinks the back strap of its undies up and wrenches it up over the head of the franchise in a kind of Atomic wedgie from Hell. If you look at the brief elder statesman action man renaissance with the Expendables franchise, it would seem with the last instalment that, in the West at least, the whole thing had run its course. The only reason we’re even entertaining the seemingly inevitable dive into a fourth instalment, is because the gross in Asia (China in particular) was superb, hoisting the worldwide gross up into impressive figures, in a franchise that won’t be far from hitting the Billion dollar mark.

However, looking at the films, you see a collection of
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Win ‘The Old Man And The Gun’ On DVD

To coincide with the release of The Old Man and the Gun, the new film from filmmaker David Lowery that stars the iconic Robert Redford, we are giving away three copies of the film on DVD.

Academy Award® Winners Robert Redford and Sissy Spacek will steal your heart in this charming comedy about the mostly true story of Forrest Tucker (Redford) – from his daring prison escape at age 70 to an unprecedented string of bank heists that confounded authorities and enchanted the public. Wrapped up in the pursuit are detective John Hunt (Casey Affleck), who is captivated by Forrest’s commitment to his craft, and Jewel (Spacek), the woman loves him despite his criminal ways.

To be in with a chance of winning all you have to do is answer the question below.

Which famous western did Robert Redford star opposite Paul Newman?

a) The Wild Bunch

b) The Good, The
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Fred Williamson, William Sadler, Martin Kove and More Join Stephen Lang in Horror Film ‘V.F.W.’

Fred Williamson, William Sadler, Martin Kove and More Join Stephen Lang in Horror Film ‘V.F.W.’
Joe Begos (Almost Human, The Mind’s Eye) has put together one hell of a leading cast for his next horror film V.F.W., which is being described as The Wild Bunch meets Night Of The Living Dead. We learned earlier this month that Stephen Lang (Don’t Breathe) will star, and Deadline reports today that he’ll be joined by the following […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

Stephen Lang to Star in Fangoria’s Horror Movie V.F.W., Directed by Joe Begos

With production underway on Chelsea Stardust's Satanic Panic and a movie adaptation of Preston Fassel’s Our Lady of the Inferno in development, Fangoria has exciting film projects on their upcoming slate, and they've now added another one to the macabre mix: the acton horror movie V.F.W., starring Stephen Lang and directed by Joe Begos.

Deadline reports that Begos will direct V.F.W. from a screenplay by Max Brallier and Matthew McArdle, with Lang in the starring role.

Described as "The Wild Bunch meets Night of the Living Dead," according to Deadline, V.F.W. "follows Fred and his military buddies as they must defend their local Vfw post – and an innocent teen – against a deranged drug dealer and his relentless army of punk mutants. These Vietnam vets have been to hell and back, but this will be the longest night of their lives."

V.F.W.
See full article at DailyDead »

Stephen Lang Joins Fangoria's V.F.W: It's The Wild Bunch Meets The Living Dead

Stephen Lang Joins Fangoria's V.F.W: It's The Wild Bunch Meets The Living Dead
Joe Begos is one of the top up-and-coming horror directors I keep an eye on. From his debut film Almost Human to his telekinetic follow-up The Mind's Eye it's just a matter of time before Begos hits the mainstream in a big, bad way. And today we have word on his next film which just might be the project that pushes him into a theater near you. This new project comes to us from the twisted minds over at the newly rebooted Fangoria and is called V.F.W.

And, get this, the movie just snagged Avatar and Don't Breathe baddie Stephen Lang as the star. Described as The Wild Bunch meets Night of the Living Dead, it follows, "Fred and his military buddies as they must defend their local Vfw post - and an innocent teen - against a deranged drug dealer and his relentless army of punk mutants.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Stephen Lang Starring in Director Joe Begos’ Next Horror Film ‘V.F.W.’ for Fangoria

Stephen Lang Starring in Director Joe Begos’ Next Horror Film ‘V.F.W.’ for Fangoria
The next film from director Joe Begos is being described as The Wild Bunch meets Night Of The Living Dead, and Deadline reports tonight that Stephen Lang (Don’t Breathe) will star. It’s titled V.F.W., an action-horror film. In Fangoria‘s V.F.W., penned by Max Brallier and Matthew McArdle… “Fred and his military buddies must defend their local […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

‘Avatar’ Star Stephen Lang To Topline Fangoria Horror Film ‘V.F.W.’

  • Deadline
‘Avatar’ Star Stephen Lang To Topline Fangoria Horror Film ‘V.F.W.’
Exclusive: Stephen Lang, who played Colonel Miles Quaritch in James Cameron’s epic sci-fi Avatar, is set to star in V.F.W., an action-horror film with Brawl in Cell Block 99 producer Dallas Sonnier and Amanda Presmyk producing for Fangoria. Joe Begos is at the helm, directing from a screenplay by Max Brallier and Matthew McArdle. Begos’ Channel 83 Films partner Josh Ethier is also producing.

Slated to go before cameras this month in Dallas, the film is described as The Wild Bunch meets Night of the Living Dead. It follows Fred and his military buddies as they must defend their local Vfw post – and an innocent teen – against a deranged drug dealer and his relentless army of punk mutants. These Vietnam vets have been to hell and back, but this will be the longest night of their lives.

Executive producers are David Gilbery and Charles Dorfman of Media Finance Capital,
See full article at Deadline »

Cinema Retro Exclusive: Interview With L.Q. Jones

  • CinemaRetro
By Andrew J. Rausch

Lq Jones is a legend. He’s been in some of the greatest American films ever made, and his extensive filmography (consisting of well over 100 films) features a virtual Who’s Who of American American cinema. He made his film debut in the 1955 Raoul Walsh war picture Battle Cry, credited with his birth name Justus E. McQueen. The character he played was a young private named...Lq Jones. Soon, at the behest of the studio, the young actor changed his name to that of the character, and the rest is history.

Lq Jones isn’t a household name, and that’s a shame, because it deserves to be. Among knowledgeable cineastes he’s seen as a god among men, a gifted and accomplished performer. He’s one of those character actors people instantly recognize, as he’s been in films with the likes of Elvis Presley,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Reflecting on ‘The Wild Bunch’s’ Innovations 50 Years Later

  • Variety
Reflecting on ‘The Wild Bunch’s’ Innovations 50 Years Later
W.K. Stratton’s new book, “‘The Wild Bunch’: Sam Peckinpah, a Revolution in Hollywood, and the Making of a Legendary Film” (Bloomsbury) makes the case for the 1969 Western about American outlaws who died bloody deaths in Mexico. Peckinpah’s masterpiece became a favorite of the Weather Underground and assorted cineastes and a solid hit for Warner Bros. Stratton spoke to Variety about the film’s many innovations and will be screening the film at 7 p.m. Feb. 26 at Laemmle’s 7 in Pasadena. A talk with critic Stephen Farber, presented by Vroman’s Bookstore, will follow the film.

The Wild Bunch’ pushed the violence envelope. What were its other important innovations?

The Wild Bunch’s’ greatest innovation lies in the production work itself. Specifically, photography. The most familiar images in the film come from the sequence that has come to be known as “the walk”: William Holden, Ernest Borgnine,
See full article at Variety »

"The Wild Bunch" Screenings In L.A. & Pasadena

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Film historian Douglas Dunning has informed Cinema Retro that Laemmle’s Playhouse 7 and Ahrya Fine Arts will be presenting the 50th anniversary screening of Sam Peckinpah’s influential 1969 film The Wild Bunch and special guests are scheduled to appear at both locations. The film stars William Holden, Ernest Borgnine, Robert Ryan, Edmund O’Brien, Warren Oates, L.Q. Jones, Jaime Sanchez, Bo Hopkins, Strother Martin, Albert Decker, Emilio Fernandez, and Alfonso Arau and runs 145 minutes.

Please Note:

Screening #1 is on February 26th at the Playhouse 7 at 7:00 pm, and at press time W.K. Stratton, the author of a new book, The Wild Bunch: Sam Peckinpah, a Revolution in Hollywood, and the Making of a Legendary Film, will participate in a discussion after the screening. He will also sign copies of his book at the theater.

Screening #2 is at the Ahrya Fine Arts on March 2nd at 7:30 pm.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Ernest Borgnine movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Marty,’ ‘The Wild Bunch,’ ‘The Dirty Dozen’

  • Gold Derby
Ernest Borgnine movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Marty,’ ‘The Wild Bunch,’ ‘The Dirty Dozen’
Ernest Borgnine would’ve celebrated his 102nd birthday on January 24, 2019. The Oscar-winning actor kept working up until his death in 2012 at the age of 95, racking up over 200 credits across film and television. But how many of those titles are classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of Borgnine’s greatest films, ranked worst to best.

SEEOscar Best Actor Gallery: Every Winner in Academy Award History

Born in 1917, Borgnine turned to acting after a stint in the Navy. Though he was often cast as a supporting player, he is perhaps best remembered for his leading role in “Marty” (1955), a small-scale drama about a middle-aged butcher who finds romance with a spinster school teacher (Betsy Blair). Shot on a modest budget in just 16 days, the film was a box office smash, winning four Oscars including Best Actor for Borgnine, Best Picture, Best Director for Delbert Mann,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Ernest Borgnine movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Ernest Borgnine movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best
Ernest Borgnine would’ve celebrated his 102nd birthday on January 24, 2019. The Oscar-winning actor kept working up until his death in 2012 at the age of 95, racking up over 200 credits across film and television. But how many of those titles are classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of Borgnine’s greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1917, Borgnine turned to acting after a stint in the Navy. Though he was often cast as a supporting player, he is perhaps best remembered for his leading role in “Marty” (1955), a small-scale drama about a middle-aged butcher who finds romance with a spinster school teacher (Betsy Blair). Shot on a modest budget in just 16 days, the film was a box office smash, winning four Oscars including Best Actor for Borgnine, Best Picture, Best Director for Delbert Mann, and Best Screenplay for Paddy Chayefsky (who adapted the script
See full article at Gold Derby »

Nick Redman, Documentary Filmmaker and Soundtrack Producer, Dies at 63

  • Variety
Nick Redman, Documentary Filmmaker and Soundtrack Producer, Dies at 63
Nick Redman, Oscar-nominated documentary filmmaker, award-winning soundtrack producer and co-founder of the Twilight Time video label, died Thursday afternoon, Jan. 17, at a Santa Monica Hospital, after a two-year battle with cancer. He was 63.

He was nominated for an Academy Award as producer of the 1996 documentary “The Wild Bunch: An Album in Montage,” a look back at Sam Peckinpah’s controversial film. He also produced and directed the 1998 “A Turning of the Earth: John Ford, John Wayne and The Searchers,” about the making of the Western classic, a prizewinner at multiple film festivals.

In 2007 he produced and directed the feature documentary “Becoming John Ford,” which debuted at the Venice International Film Festival and detailed the long and complex relationship between the famous director and 20th Century-Fox studio chief Darryl F. Zanuck.

He made numerous other short films including profiles of actress Stella Stevens and film composers Basil Poledouris and Jerry Fielding.
See full article at Variety »

Cinematographers Share Their List of the 100 Best Shot Films of the 20th Century

In celebration of its 100th anniversary, the American Society of Cinematographers has released a list of the 100 best shot films of the 20th century.

This list was released to "showcase the best of cinematography as selected by professional cinematographers.” Here's how the list was put together:

The process of cultivating the 100 films began with Asc members each submitting 10 to 25 titles that were personally inspirational or perhaps changed the way they approached their craft. “I asked them — as cinematographers, members of the Asc, artists, filmmakers and people who love film and whose lives were shaped by films — to list the films that were most influential,” Fierberg explains. A master list was then complied, and members voted on what they considered to be the most essential 100 titles.

Here's a little sizzle reel that was cut together showcasing some of the films on the list:

It's hard to argue with the Top 10 films,
See full article at GeekTyrant »

The 100 Greatest Achievements in Cinematography in the 20th Century, According to Asc

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the American Society of Cinematographers (Asc) this year, they’ve polled their members to determine 100 milestone films in the art and craft of cinematography of the 20th century. Topping the list is David Lean’s epic Lawrence of Arabia, shot by Freddie Young. Also in the top ten is Blade Runner (Jordan Cronenweth), The Conformist (Vittorio Storaro), Days of Heaven (Néstor Almendros), and more.

Organized by Steven Fierberg, he said “Asc members wanted to call attention to the most significant achievements of the cinematographer’s art but not refer to one achievement as ‘better’ than another. The selected films represent a range of styles, eras and visual artistry, but most importantly, it commemorates films that are inspirational or influential to Asc members and have exhibited enduring influence on generations of filmmakers.”

See the top 10 below, along with the full list.

1. Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Freddie Young,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Lawrence of Arabia’ Tops Asc’s List of 100 20th Century Cinematography Milestones

  • Variety
The American Society of Cinematographers, in celebration of the organization’s 100th anniversary, has revealed its list of 100 milestone films in the art and craft of cinematography from the 20th century. The list culminates with a top 10, topped by Freddie Young’s lensing of David Lean’s Oscar-winning 1962 epic “Lawrence of Arabia.”

Jordan Cronenweth’s work on Ridley Scott’s 1982 sci-fi standard “Blade Runner” came in at number two. Celebrated cinematographer Roger Deakins finally won an Oscar last year for the film’s sequel, “Blade Runner 2049.”

Vittorio Storaro rounded out the top three for Francis Ford Coppola’s 1979 Vietnam odyssey “Apocalypse Now.” He, Conrad Hall and Gordon Willis each appeared on the overall list five times, leading the pack. John Alcott, Caleb Deschanel and Haskell Wexler each lensed four.

Organized by Steven Fierberg, Asc (“The Affair”) and voted on by Asc members, the milestones list is the first of
See full article at Variety »

Was 1939 really the best year in movie history?

A clutch of film buffs and staff writers at my favorite newspaper, the Washington Post, devoted considerable time, thought and space to a weekend article challenging 1939’s claim to the title of “Best Movie Year Ever.” Prompted by the number of critics appending “great” to 2018, the Post decided to look back and single out the greatest years in film, and after a brainstorming session, its writers settled on 1939 and six subsequent years — 1946, 1955, 1974, 1982, 1999, and 2007 — and assigned a sponsor to each one.

It was a cute idea and a fool’s errand if anyone’s ever been sent on one. It also produced fun reading, even if 1939 need not worry about its place in film history. There were unique reasons for 1939 (and ‘40 and ‘41) turning out so many enduring movies.

Hollywood had been recently and grudgingly unionized, giving directors in particular more power over their studio assignments. The country was in a dark mood,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Escape From New York (4K restoration) Re-release Review

  • HeyUGuys
Re-released alongside three other John Carpenter 4K restorations, the horror master’s dystopian action sci-fi from 1981 seethes on the big screen while seeming paradoxically low-fi next to the great swathe of action trash that followed in its wake. Escape From New York melts urban/punk Noir aesthetics into 80s action with a dash of inadvertent political/ social commentary that’s less at the subtext’s foreground than the consumerism/ conformity nods in They Live, but “evident” in retrospect.

The concept is high: it’s 1997 (the future/ “Now”), Liberty island has been transformed into a maximum security prison. Air Force One crashes there, leaving Us president (Donald Pleasence) stranded. The government dispatches scowling one-eyed convict Snake Plissken (Kurt Russell) to rescue him, armed with a gun, tracker, the chance of freedom and a deadly serum pumping through his veins that will only be neutralized upon the president’s safe return.

The set-up imparts,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Movie Poster of the Week: Antonio Stella’s Top 10 Favorite Movie Posters

  • MUBI
Above: Tony Stella’s illustration for an alternative poster for Suspiria for Alphaville.One of my favorite working movie poster illustrators is the Italian-born, Berlin-based artist Tony Stella, a true connoisseur of cinema as well as a prodigious and prolific artist. I profiled Tony in this column a few years ago. Tony recently joined forces with the designer known as Midnight Marauder to start the boutique movie poster design agency Alphaville, and since I recently asked Mm for his ten favorite movie posters it was only fair that I ask Tony too, a task he took up with alacrity.So, without further ado, here are Tony Stella’s ten favorite movie posters of all-time, in ascending order, with his own comments. His choices take us on a tour through some of the best movie poster illustration of the past 50 years.10. Get Carter (1971)“The number ten spot was a toss-up between
See full article at MUBI »
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