Jory (1973) Poster

(1973)

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Familiar story, though decently done
Wizard-85 January 2003
The story here - orphaned boy learning to become a man in the wild west - shouldn't be unfamiliar with any viewer, and the various turns in the story will be equally anticipated. Still, it's fairly well done for what it is, with a good performance by Benson (though his character is made to recover from his father's death surprisingly quick.) One interesting thing about the movie is that while it was aimed at a young audience at the time (and was rated PG), some of its content (violent and bloody killings, skinny dipping, etc.) may surprise certain parents. However, none of this is presented in an exploitive way, and gives the movie a good degree of honesty.
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7/10
A Lot Of Growing Up To Do
bkoganbing21 July 2009
Warning: Spoilers
Though this film has an appealing juvenile star with Robby Benson in his first really substantial role, Jory is definitely not for the family trade. It's a tale about a kid who had to grow up real fast, especially when he starts losing everyone near and dear to him.

Robby and his father Claudio Brook are traveling west, Brook is a ne'er do well lawyer with a drinking problem. He gets killed in a really stupid drunken brawl by a cavalryman. Benson evens the score for him, but of course has to beat it out of town.

Trail boss John Marley takes him on a cattle drive and young cowboy B.J. Thomas who sports a two gun rig and is quite adept at all kinds of fancy twirling, takes Benson under his wing. The rest of the film is about Benson facing all kinds of adverse conditions before he realizes maybe he does have the right stuff to make it in the west.

Country singer B.J. Thomas, known best for singing Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head from Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid has the most interesting role in the film. He's a punk, but a likable one and when he gets killed after ignoring some very good advice, you do think about him the rest of the movie.

Coming of age movies are always interesting and appealing to a certain audience. But this is a very violent film, good but still quite violent. Parents of small kids beware.
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7/10
Boy becomes a man the hard way
helpless_dancer20 May 2000
Good tale of the old west in which a young boy becomes a man after his family is wiped out. Old story line, yes, but it still made for a fine film. B.J. Thomas was effective as the expert gun handler who was unable to fire at another human, even in his own defense. One of Robby Benson's best performances.
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4/10
JORY (Jorge Fons, 1973) **
Bunuel197625 April 2008
Warning: Spoilers
Dreary Western tale, cheaply made and given uninspired handling – making it virtually indistinguishable from any of the typical fare being shown on TV in the same vein, a status which would hasten the end of this most popular and long-standing of genres!

The titular character is a 15-year old boy (Robby Benson) who witnesses the death of his drunkard, piano-playing lawyer father (surprisingly played by Luis Bunuel regular Claudio Brook!), kills the man responsible and then joins a cattle drive. Here, he befriends a young fast-draw – getting to learn the tricks of the trade into the bargain – and is paternally looked after by the elderly foreman (John Marley, also an unexpected presence in this type of film but not ineffective); along the way, the young man is brutally shot dead when challenged by a bully in a saloon (Brad Dexter) – with Jory gunning down the latter there and then. Eventually, the company reaches its destination – a ranch which is constantly under threat from a rival cattle baron – and Jory is assigned to protect the boss' teenage daughter; at one point, the two kids are kidnapped and Marley dies attempting to save them…after which Jory leaves to search for his very own "Promised Land".

Pointless in the long run – to say nothing of contrived (with every person whom Jory looks up to getting killed before his very eyes!), the film is essentially a time-waster for genre addicts.
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5/10
Robby Benson Leans to Shoot
wes-connors3 September 2012
Fifteen-year-old Robby Benson (as Jory Walden) rides into a western town with his father, looking for a place to settle down. Dropping by the local saloon, young Benson witnesses a murder. Consequently, Benson needs to leave town. He joins cattle driver John Marley (as Roy Starr) and his quick-drawing sidekick B.J. Thomas (as Jocko). After being taught to handle a gun by Mr. Thomas, Benson and the company attract trigger-happy outlaws. Quickly becoming one of the fastest guns in the west, Benson is hired to look after nubile blonde teenager Linda Purl (as Amy Barron)...

The person who hires Benson to guard Ms. Purl's body is her own father. Given the kids' mutual attraction, the man has to be the most permissive Dad in the west. He sends them off riding together; then Purl, who has been eying Benson from the start, decides to go skinny-dipping. Benson sees it all. We don't. This strange film features some warmly lighted and photographed (by George Stahl) location scenes. Popular singer B.J. Thomas has a good screen presence and is most appealing in his rare acting role. Surprisingly, Curtis Young sings the moody ending song "Jory" instead of Thomas.

***** Jory (2/17/73) Jorge Fons ~ Robby Benson, John Marley, B.J. Thomas, Linda Purl
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A fair good western
searchanddestroy-116 January 2012
Warning: Spoilers
A really good surprise for me to discover this little gem. I am not particularly fond of westerns, but this one reminds me another feature from the nearly same year, and starring Gary Grimes: CULPEPPER'S CATTLE COMPANY, directed by Dick Richards, one of the best real life western ever made. Both describe the "odyssey" of a young man among mature men who will teach him the real life. Poignant stories for these two movies. I don't know the director, even most of the actors too. It's actually a seventies film, and avoids many clichés. I guess Andrew Mac Laglen would have not made such a film. For sure.

Worth watching.
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7/10
Teen actor debut adds unique twist to this Western
wrxsti541 August 2019
Warning: Spoilers
"Jory" follows the fortunes of the 15 year old son (named Jory) of a down-on-his-luck drunkard lawyer trying to restart life in the tough western frontier. It begins dramatically with Jory orphaned on the first night after a bar fight because his father played Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata on the bar piano with Jory later fighting and killing the drunken killer of his father. Jory is then forced to grow up fast as a cowboy joining a horse drive to Texas and then protecting the rancher's teenage daughter.

What is interesting about this western is that the 15 year old lead happens to be the major screen acting debut of '70's teen idol Robby Benson whose claim to fame was as a blue eyed pretty boy with model quality features, a kind of lankier, more tanned 1970's version of Justin Bieber! Benson later became famous for doe eyed, whispy voiced sensitive roles and you certainly see the beginning of this in Jory and at first glance, Benson seems to be altogether the wrong type of actor for this rugged boy-to-man story but he actually carries it off very well. This is partly because he's the same age as his character and that is rare in modern films where the norm is young looking 20+ year olds acting in mid teen roles, in much the same way Logan Lehman brought similar realism to his role in "3:10 to Yuma", another boy forced to grow up fast Western.

Benson as Jory actually gives this movie a unique flavor for what would ordinarily be just a pretty run of the mill Western of the type so common in the 70's.
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