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(1973–1978)

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Richmond Shepard, Celebrated as ‘The World’s Oldest Mime,’ Dies at 90

  • Variety
Richmond Shepard, Celebrated as ‘The World’s Oldest Mime,’ Dies at 90
Richmond Shepard, one of America’s foremost practitioners and proponents of the art of mime, died in Manhattan July 2 at age 90.

Shepard’s family announced his passing with an unusual request: “In lieu of flowers, Richmond has requested a moment of noise.”

Although he was most famous as a mime — and received fresh notoriety three years ago when he was featured in an online New Yorker video, “The World’s Oldest Mime” — Shepard was also a well-known personality in the bicoastal theater communities as a director, critic and theater operator, with small stages that bore his name in both L.A. and New York.

Shepard was the author of “Mime: The Technique of Silence,” a 1970 book considered an essential text for anyone looking to take up the craft. His early television work included appearances on “The Today Show” and talk shows with Merv Griffin, Steve Allen and Dinah Shore. His
See full article at Variety »

Ken Kercheval Dies: ‘Dallas’ Actor Was 83

  • Deadline
Ken Kercheval Dies: ‘Dallas’ Actor Was 83
Actor Ken Kercheval, best known as Texas businessman Cliff Barnes on the CBS series Dallas, has died. A cause of death is not known, but a spokesperson at the Frist Funeral Home in the actor’s hometown of Clinton, Indiana, told Deadline that Kercheval died Sunday. He was 83.

Kercheval’s character was a signature presence on Dallas — along with his bitter rival J.R. Ewing (Larry Hagman), Barnes was the only character to appear in all 14 seasons (1978-1991) of the soapy saga about Texas crude and crude Texans. The character was originally modeled on Robert F. Kennedy but that template didn’t hold for long. Instead Barnes was defined by his family’s rivalry with the Ewings and his character was spun in varied directions as needed — his job title, for instance, changed a dozen times over the course of the series.

Kercheval was also in the 1986 prequel Dallas: The Early Years, a TV movie that fleshed out the franchise’s central conflict, the rivalry between the two oil industry families. Kercheval also returned to the character for the 1996 television movie Dallas: J.R. Returns and then again for three seasons (2012-2014) of a Dallas revival, which presented the career-bouncing Barnes as a casino industry player.

Dallas also gave Kercheval a chance to experiment with job directions himself: He went behind the camera to direct an episode of the series in each of its final two seasons.

Kercheval was born July 15, 1935, in Wolcottville, Ind., and raised in nearby Clinton. A music and drama major at Indiana University he later studied at the Neighborhood Playhouse in New York. Kercheval began his professional acting career on the stage, making his Broadway debut in the 1962 play Something About A Soldier. He went on to appear Off-Broadway in 1972’s Berlin to Broadway with Kurt Weill revue. His other theatre credits include The Apple Tree, Cabaret (replacing Bert Convy as Cliff), and Here’s Where I Belong. He also appeared as the title character in the original Broadway production of Fiddler on the Roof, co-starring with Herschel Bernardi, Maria Karnilova, Julia Migenes, Leonard Frey, and Pia Zadora.

It was television, however, where Kercheval became a face familiar to millions. His credits included appearances on E.R., L.A. Law,, Murder She Wrote, CHiPs, Highway to Heaven, Kojak, The Love Boat, Matlock, and Starsky & Hutch. His film credits include Network, The Seven-Ups and F.I.S.T. in the 1970s.
See full article at Deadline »

Sidney Sheinberg, MCA/Universal Exec Who Nurtured Steven Spielberg, Dies at 84

  • Variety
Sidney Sheinberg, MCA/Universal Exec Who Nurtured Steven Spielberg, Dies at 84
Sidney Sheinberg, who served for more than 20 years as president and COO of MCA, Inc and Universal Studios and helped build the former agency into a potent entertainment corporation, died Thursday at his home in Beverly Hills. He was 84.

Sheinberg’s son, Jonathan, confirmed the news in an email.

“He was an amazing man,” he wrote. Jonathan also remembered his father’s impact on the industry and the people whose lives Sheinberg touched through philanthropy.

“My heart is broken at this news,” said Steven Spielberg in a statement. “For now let me just say that Sid had a big personality and a tender heart. He was the tallest most stand up guy I ever knew. He gave birth to my career and made Universal my home. He gave me ‘Jaws,’ I gave him ‘ET’ and he gave me ‘Schindler’s List.’ We were a team for 25 years and he was
See full article at Variety »

Richard Gere conquered theatre and cinema … can he now score a TV hit?

Writer Tom Rob Smith tells of ‘wooing’ actor for state-of-the-nation BBC series MotherFatherSon

The first time Richard Gere appeared in a television series it was 1976 and the then little-known actor was in a single episode of the New York crime drama Kojak, playing a crook holding up a liquor store. Gere has since gone on to rather more illustrious parts, but now the Hollywood star is taking on his first major small-screen role in an eagerly awaited BBC Two drama.

Tom Rob Smith, the writer of MotherFatherSon, which starts next month, embarked on “a long wooing process” with Gere, eventually convincing him to take the part by assuring him it would be like performing on stage. “The question I asked was: when has Richard Gere recently had the chance to do a big two-page monologue?” Smith told the Observer.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Richard Gere conquered theatre and cinema … can he now score a TV hit?

Writer Tom Rob Smith tells of ‘wooing’ actor for state-of-the-nation BBC series MotherFatherSon

The first time Richard Gere appeared in a television series it was 1976 and the then little-known actor was in a single episode of the New York crime drama Kojak, playing a crook holding up a liquor store. Gere has since gone on to rather more illustrious parts, but now the Hollywood star is taking on his first major small-screen role in an eagerly awaited BBC Two drama.

Tom Rob Smith, the writer of MotherFatherSon, which starts next month, embarked on “a long wooing process” with Gere, eventually convincing him to take the part by assuring him it would be like performing on stage. “The question I asked was: when has Richard Gere recently had the chance to do a big two-page monologue?” Smith told the Observer.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Carmen Argenziano Dies: ‘Stargate Sg-1’, ‘Godfather 2’ Actor Was 75

  • Deadline
Carmen Argenziano Dies: ‘Stargate Sg-1’, ‘Godfather 2’ Actor Was 75
Carmen Argenziano, an actor familiar from hundreds of episodic TV guest spots, a recurring Stargate Sg-1 role, an appearance in The Godfather Part 2 and, most recently, a TV commercial for Aarp that cast him as the epitome of an helpful husband who takes the trash out before being asked, died Sunday. He was 75.

His death was announced by his personal appearance agency Event Horizon Talent. A cause of death was not disclosed.

With more than 200 credits lists on his IMdB page, Argenziano’s acting career stretches back 50 years to 1969’s Judd for the Defense, and proceeded on to appearances in such popular drama and cop series as Kojak, The F.B.I., Police Woman, Police Story and The Bionic Woman. He played one of Michael Corleone’s soldiers in The Godfather Part II, and later recurred on L.A. Law., CSI: NY and daytime’s The Young and the Restless.

Though mostly cast in police and crime dramas,
See full article at Deadline »

Verna Bloom, ‘Animal House’ and ‘Last Temptation of Christ’ Actress, Dies at 80

  • The Wrap
Verna Bloom, ‘Animal House’ and ‘Last Temptation of Christ’ Actress, Dies at 80
Verna Bloom, a character actress best known for playing the cheating wife of Dean Wormer in “Animal House” and Mary, mother of Jesus in Martin Scorsese’s “The Last Temptation of Christ,” has died at age 80.

A family spokesperson told USA Today that Bloom died from complications from dementia.

Bloom made her film debut co-starring in Haskell Wexler’s acclaimed 1969 drama “Medium Cool,” for which she received a best actress and best supporting actress nomination from the National Society of Film Critics.

She appeared as Sarah Belding in Clint Eastwood’s 1973 Western “High Plains Drifter,” and later worked again with Eastwood in his 1982 film “Honkytonk Man.”

During this time, Bloom also struck a working relationship with Scorsese, appearing in three of his films: 1970’s “Street Scenes,” 1985’s “After Hours,” and in 1988, “The Last Temptation of Christ.”

Also Read: Daryl Dragon, the Captain of Pop Duo Captain and Tennille, Dies at
See full article at The Wrap »

Best Drama Series lineup includes only first-time Golden Globe nominees for the first time in 42 years

Best Drama Series lineup includes only first-time Golden Globe nominees for the first time in 42 years
For the first time since 1976, the Golden Globe Awards did not nominate any past nominees for Best Drama Series. The nominees are four new dramas and one returning drama that the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. had not previously acknowledged in the top category (“The Americans”).

Incumbent nominees “The Crown,” “Game of Thrones” and “Stranger Things” were ineligible because they did not air in 2018; fellow incumbent “The Handmaid’s Tale” was relegated to nominations for its actresses and the other incumbent “This is Us” was shut out for the first time.

Eligible past winners “The Affair,” “Grey’s Anatomy” and “Mr. Robot” were also snubbed as were eligible past nominees “Empire” and “House of Cards.” “Outlander” and “Westworld” were the only past Best Drama Series nominees other than “The Handmaid’s Tale” to factor into the nominations; they also received recognition only for their actresses.

SEEour editors react to the Golden Globe television nominations.
See full article at Gold Derby »

It Came From The Tube: She Cried Murder (1973)

Economy was the key to a solid TV movie back in the day; sure, now you can stretch out a story over ten episodes and watch ‘em all at once. *Pulls up pants even higher* But back in my time you had 75 to 90 minutes tops to get your point across, and we liked it! Even better, a small screen flick like She Cried Murder (1973) does it in a speedy 66, omitting unnecessary tropes such as love stories, secondary characters, and plot.

Okay, I’m just being cheeky; She Cried Murder is so lean that all it really has time for is a cat and mouse chase between a woman who witnessed a murder and the fella who did it; motive is covered quite tidily so it isn’t all chase, and what it does accomplish is effective enough. Not enough to deter folk from watching the ABC Tuesday Movie of the
See full article at DailyDead »

Will Sterling K. Brown (‘This Is Us’) win back-to-back Golden Globes, or is this finally Milo Ventimiglia’s year?

  • Gold Derby
Will Sterling K. Brown (‘This Is Us’) win back-to-back Golden Globes, or is this finally Milo Ventimiglia’s year?
Last year Sterling K. Brown went on an awards sweep for NBC’s “This Is Us,” taking home the Emmy, SAG Award and Golden Globe for his role as family man Randall Pearson. With the Golden Globe nominations just around the corner, Brown is predicted to hear his name called again for Best TV Drama Actor, but he’ll likely be joined this year by co-star Milo Ventimiglia. Amazing, Ventimiglia has yet to be recognized by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association despite starring in everything from “Gilmore Girls” to “Heroes.” Might this finally be his year?

See A ‘This Is Us’ Golden Globes snub might yield another broadcast-less Best Drama Series lineup

Ventimiglia portrays Randall’s adoptive father Jack Pearson on NBC’s family drama, with much of the first half of Season 3 focusing on his early courtship with Rebecca (Mandy Moore) and exploring his service during Vietnam. Since the
See full article at Gold Derby »

Roger Robinson, Tony-Winning Actor and a Detective on 'Kojak,' Dies at 78

Roger Robinson, Tony-Winning Actor and a Detective on 'Kojak,' Dies at 78
Roger Robinson, the veteran character actor who won a Tony Award, starred in such films as Brother to Brother and had recurring roles on Kojak and How to Get Away With Murder, has died. He was 78.

Robinson died Wednesday in Escondido, California, of complications from a heart condition, Ebony Repertory Theatre producing artistic director Wren T. Brown announced.

In last year's HBO telefilm The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, Robinson portrayed Day Lacks, the first cousin and father of Henrietta's (Renee Elise Goldsberry) children. And on ABC's How to Get Away With Murder, he played Mac Harkness, the father of Viola ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Susan Brown Dead at 86

Susan Brown, who is best known for her role as Dr. Gail Adamson Baldwin on General Hospital, died on August 31 after battling Alzheimer’s disease. She was 86.

General Hospital showrunner Frank Valentini took to Twitter to confirm her death saying, "It's a very sad day in Port Charles as the wonderful Susan Brown (“Gail Baldwin”) passed away today. My sincerest condolences to her family and to all who knew this amazing woman."

Brown was born in San Francisco and graduated from the University of Southern California. Her acting career launched in 1959 with the soap opera From The Roots, where she played Liz Fraser Allen. She went on to appear in numerous soaps including The Young Marrieds (as Ann Reynolds), Bright Promise (as Martha Ferguson), and Return to Peyton Place (as Constance MacKenzie).

She took on the role of Dr. Gail Adamson Baldwin in 1977. The character was Monica Webber's foster
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Susan Brown Dies: Emmy Nominated ‘General Hospital’ Actress Was 86

  • Deadline
Susan Brown Dies: Emmy Nominated ‘General Hospital’ Actress Was 86
Susan Brown, who is best known for her role as Dr. Gail Adamson Baldwin on General Hospital, died Friday after battling Alzheimer’s disease. She was 86.

General Hospital showrunner Frank Valentini took to Twitter to confirm her death saying, “It’s a very sad day in Port Charles as the wonderful Susan Brown (“Gail Baldwin”) passed away today. My sincerest condolences to her family and to all who knew this amazing woman.”

Brown was born in San Francisco and graduated from the University of Southern California. Her acting career launched in 1959 with the soap opera From The Roots. She went on to appear in numerous soaps including The Young Marrieds, Bright Promise, and Return to Peyton Place where she played the character of Constance MacKenzie.

She stepped into the role of Dr. Gail Adamson Baldwin in 1977. The character was Monica Webber’s foster mother who married Peter Hansen’s Lee Baldwin.
See full article at Deadline »

General Hospital Star Susan Brown Dead at 86

Veteran actress Susan Brown, best known for playing Dr. Gail Adamson Baldwin on General Hospital, has died at the age of 86. “Sad to say one of my best friends and co-stars, Susan Brown, passed away today,” Kin Shriner (Scotty) reported on Twitter. “She played Gail Baldwin, my mother. Rip, Susan. I will miss all our laughs.” Brown first joined the soap in 1977, and was nominated for a Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress just two years later in 1979. While she left Gh in 1985, Brown continued to make occasional appearances before returning in 1992 on a recurring basis. Gail and Lee Baldwin were also part of the core family on the Gh spin-off Port Charles, and Brown and Peter Hansen could be seen making appearances on both shows. Their final episode of Gh was in 2004 for a special hour honoring the late Anna Lee, who played Lila Quartermaine. Susan Brown and
See full article at ABC Soaps in Depth »

19 TV Reboots That Should Have Been Booted (Photos)

19 TV Reboots That Should Have Been Booted (Photos)
With reboots of “Charmed” and “Magnum Pi” on the way, TheWrap looks at TV revivals that never should’ve happened

“Charlie’s Angels”

“Charlie’s Angels” perfectly captured the goofiness of the ’70s, but it felt painfully out of date in 2011. Critics and audiences agreed: It was canceled after three episodes.

Ironside

Blair Underwood has done some memorable TV work, starting with his career-making role on “L.A. Law.” But his 2013 take on the Raymond Burr crime drama was yanked from NBC’s air even faster than you can say “Lax” or “The Event.”

The Bionic Woman

A 2007 take on the “Six Million Dollar Man” spinoff, this NBC show’s original sin was casting “Battlestar Galactica” ass-kicker Katee Sackhoff as the recurring villain rather than the lead.

Knight Rider

Like so much ’80s television, the original “Knight Rider” is over-celebrated. But NBC’s 2008 version lacked even the original’s dumb charms — and David Hasselhoff.
See full article at The Wrap »

Interview: ‘Die Zombiejager’ director Jonas Wolcher

  • Nerdly
What inspired you to get into filmmaking?

It was my grandfather. He loved movies and books and introduced me to all kinds of movies when I was five years old. We only had Danish and Swedish television, so we had 3 channels, but the Danish television was so much better than the Swedish television because they showed more movies. He was almost like a father to me and introduced me to Alfred Hitchcock, the Wolfman, Dracula and Frankenstein. I watched all of the Frankenstein films when I was around six years old. Dirty Harry (1971), Kojak (1973-9178) and a lot of Italian crime. I remember he told me “Jonas, its only ketchup. The actors never die, its only fake”. I think that experience began my fascination into films.

I didn’t start to do films until 1999. Before that I studied to be a journalist for radio. That is something which I really
See full article at Nerdly »

Chuck McCann Dies: Comedian And Legendary Children’s TV Show Host Was 83

  • Deadline
Chuck McCann Dies: Comedian And Legendary Children’s TV Show Host Was 83
Beloved children’s TV show host, comedian, puppeteer, actor, and voiceover artist Chuck McCann died on April 8 from congenital heart failure at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, Deadline has confirmed. He was 83.

McCann was born on September 2, 1934 in Brooklyn, New York. It was in his hometown where he made a name for himself as a versatile entertainer in the ’60s. He, along with Soupy Sales, Sandy Becker, and Claude Kirschner were comedic influencers of the time. He worked on various children’s shows including Captain Kangaroo and Rootie Kazootie.

In 1963, he headed The Chuck McCann Show which ran on New York’s Wpix-tv, seven days a week. He went on to host Chuck McCann’s Laurel & Hardy TV Show in 1966 which featured Laurel & Hardy animated cartoons created by Hanna-Barbera. The show gave McCann the opportunity to do his Oliver Hardy imitation.

His television career also included recurring roles on Santa Barbara,
See full article at Deadline »

Quantum Leap Movie Script Has Been Written

Quantum Leap Movie Script Has Been Written
The 1980s and 1990s are more popular than ever, so it isn't terribly surprising to learn that an iconic series from that era, Quantum Leap, may get a movie reboot. Series creator Donald Bellisario revealed during a Quantum Leap reunion panel at L.A. Comic-Con with series star Scott Bakula, that he has written a script for a Quantum Leap movie that would bring back original series stars Bakula as Dr. Samuel Beckett and Dean Stockwell as Admiral Al Calavicci. Here's what Donald Bellisario had to say in a statement.

"I just finished writing a Quantum Leap feature. I don't know what's going to happen with it, but I did write it. I write things exactly the same way. I just start writing and I let them take me wherever it's going to take me. I'm entertained the same way the audience is. So I just put Scott and Dean [Stockwell] in my head,
See full article at MovieWeb »

William Tepper Dies: Star Of Jack Nicholson’s ‘Drive, He Said’ Was 69

William Tepper Dies: Star Of Jack Nicholson’s ‘Drive, He Said’ Was 69
William Tepper, who starred in Jack Nicholson’s directorial debut Drive, He Said and accompanied Nicholson to the 1971 Cannes Film Festival, died Wednesday of an apparent heart attack. He was 69. Tepper’s death was confirmed by his manager Jon Klane. Tepper, known as Bill, also appeared in Bachelor Party (1984), the Richard Gere starrer Breathless (1983), and ’70s TV series including Kojak and Ironside. Tepper also wrote and produced the 2006 film Grilled, starring Ray…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Watch Jeffrey Tambor Praise Humanity of 'Transparent' on 'Seth Meyers'

Watch Jeffrey Tambor Praise Humanity of 'Transparent' on 'Seth Meyers'
Jeffrey Tambor praised Transparent creator Jill Soloway on Late Night With Seth Meyers. "She's exploring, and telling people what it's like, and the humanity and the travails of the transgender community," Tambor said. "And I think there is not a more opportune time to be talking about this."

The actor, who won an Emmy Award last year for portraying Maura Pfefferman on Transparent, also spoke about owning his own bookstore, an old commercial audition where he and 200 other actors pretended they knew how to ice skate and a scene from
See full article at Rolling Stone »
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